Hunters Remorse After the hunt

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posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 08:55 AM
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This may sound a bit crazy.... but, get a ferret. I have one, she's friendly, loves people and playing with them, never bitten anyone. Watching her "weasel war dance" is hilarious.Some you get at pet stores haven't been handled much, so watch your fingers til they get used to you. Collect the urine and spread it around the property. I had moles til I tried that. I just took her out on the property and let her roam while I kept an eye on her. I let her mark or investigate where ever she wanted, but didn't let her go down a hole. They got the message and cleared out.

en.wikipedia.org...


For millennia, the main use of ferrets was for hunting, or ferreting. With their long, lean build, and inquisitive nature, ferrets are very well equipped for getting down holes and chasing rodents, rabbits and moles out of their burrows.




posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 09:07 AM
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reply to post by camaro68ss
 



I have a 30-30 Marlin that was my dads. It was the gun i got my first kill with, a hog back when I was a kid.

It was early morning and we were out hunting. I had been in my spot for about an hour, and the sun was just starting to break. Very, very cold.

All of a sudden i see half a dozen small hogs come out of a tree line. I know that more will follow, and the longer you wait the bigger they are. So i waited, and waited. First those little piglets. Next a few 30lb oens. Then a couple more 60-70 pounders. Then when I could wait not more, a 130 pounder walked out of the tree line.

Knowing you only get 1 shot before they scatter, I made sure I sighted him in well. I breathed deeply, reminding my self to squeeze the trigger, not pull the trigger. Went through the entire mental checklist, then set my aim right behind his left ear. Even a 30-30 round can deflect off that thick coat of armor on the skull. And a body shot spoils the meat. Right behind the ear....that is the sweet spot.

Then i squeezed. BAM....a loud recoil. Since i wasn't at the range, i didn't have ear protection on, and my ears started ringing.

The bullet hit him right where i was aiming. It hit him hard, having only gone about 100 yards. He went airborn, flew in a helicopter pattern, and then landed after doing a full 360 in the air. When he landed he twitched. A lot. For a long time. "Twitch" doesn't do justice. He kicked violently for a while. With it being my first kill, i was unsure if he was dead or not, and wanted to stop the kicking. THere was no squealing. So i took out my sidearm and put another 3 or 4 rounds in his head (i was carrying a 38 that day). He didn't stop kicking, and dust was flying everywhere.

It was a life altering event. The realness of life and death became completely focused. And I understood that killing was not a sport. You don't high five over it. YOu do it somberly, with respect. With reason. With good reason.

If you had to eat, you would kill that deer without pause.



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 09:10 AM
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Originally posted by blupblup

Originally posted by TheRedneck
I am a big proponent of hunting; I love venison, and like about any kind of critter we have around here: rabbit, squirrel, turtle, snake, even possum and raccoon. But I don't think I have ever killed an animal without some part of me wishing it hadn't had to be. That doesn't stop me from killing it, if it must be killed, but even putting down a rogue dog that is attacking makes me somewhat sorrowful for the animal.




But you don't have to kill them?

You have stores/shops near you I'm guessing?

So you don't have to shoot any animal, saying that you wish it didn't have to be seems like lip service, it doesn't have to be, you're choosing to do it.
edit on 23/6/13 by blupblup because: (no reason given)


You don't think that ground beef and chicken quarters you buy at the store is picked off the "dinner tree" do you? Regardless of how it is procured anytime you eat meat you are responsible either directly or indirectly for taking a life.

I would personally rather eat grouse and pheasant or chicken that we raise than to eat chicken from the store and same goes for our beef and lamb. Besides lacking the hormones and antibiotics of farm raised meat, there is the fact in my mind that at least the animal I kill out in the wild for food has lived a free life and been free to enjoy its life in the natural setting that nature intended it to live in.

Ever been to a chicken farm, or dairy farm? The chickens are kept in small crowded cages, sometimes millions to a chicken house, with no chance ever in their lives to move or enjoy any symblance of truly living. Same holds true of many dairy, turkey, and dairy farms. And don't even get me started on veal, those animals are treated in a way that IMO is torture.



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 09:31 AM
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Originally posted by Nucleardiver
You don't think that ground beef and chicken quarters you buy at the store is picked off the "dinner tree" do you?



I'm not a retard, of course I don't.

But I don't spout off about how guilty I feel about buying meat and how awful it is, and then go and keep eating meat, which was my objection to the post I quoted.





Regardless of how it is procured anytime you eat meat you are responsible either directly or indirectly for taking a life.



Yes, the animals that I eat are bred specifically for food, they wouldn't exist were it not for farming.
I don't go into their environment or into the woods and kill stuff.

And I am not the person who said I feel awful when killing stuff.

It's like a psychopathic killer saying they feel remorse for their last victim, while then going out killing more people.





I would personally rather eat grouse and pheasant or chicken that we raise than to eat chicken from the store and same goes for our beef and lamb. Besides lacking the hormones and antibiotics of farm raised meat, there is the fact in my mind that at least the animal I kill out in the wild for food has lived a free life and been free to enjoy its life in the natural setting that nature intended it to live in.



I absolutely agree with you on that,
Rearing your own animals is absolutely the way to go.... no problem with that at all.

I'm lucky that in my country, hormones aren't used and we actually have a ban on importing US beef because of the crap that's pumped into it.
We also banned battery hens/chickens and they have to have a decent amount of room, sunlight and activities too... not just crammed in a cage and left to stew in their own filth, those days are long gone.

Buying farm animals or rearing your own, in my mind, is not the same as going out and just shooting whatever you feel like eating, as the guy I quoted said he did.

And I don't feel bad every time I eat meat.... I don't weep for my food, If I did, I'd stop eating it.

It's completely hypocritical what the guy said, which is why I pointed it out.





Ever been to a chicken farm, or dairy farm? The chickens are kept in small crowded cages, sometimes millions to a chicken house, with no chance ever in their lives to move or enjoy any symblance of truly living. Same holds true of many dairy, turkey, and dairy farms. And don't even get me started on veal, those animals are treated in a way that IMO is torture.



As I said, not in my country, thankfully.

If I lived in the US, knowing the crap that you pump your animals full of, I would be veggie by now I'm sure.



posted on Jun, 26 2013 @ 12:29 PM
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Sometimes hunting is not for food but to protect food populations.

Not long ago they reintroduced wolves into the northern part of my state.. Needless to say as that population exploded they expanded into territories to which they were not intended to be re-introduced.

Outside of the control area in my state they are considered predatory and are basically a "shoot on sight" animal.

The issue is they did not reintroduce American Timberwolf but instead the larger and much more aggressive Canadian grey wolf.

They are decimating elk populations that serve as a food source for many of us around here.

In my hunt area there is an extremely large pack of wolves that I will be doing my part to cull this year.

------------------------------------------------

Personally OP I would be gravely disheartened were you not to feel remorse after taking a life. That would make you a sociopath.

I never feel good after I take a life, but I do what I must in order to either preserve the beautiful wildlife around here or to feed my family.

It is important to make that distinction..

I personally have a huge problem with "horn hunters".. You know... people that kill for fun.



posted on Jun, 26 2013 @ 12:34 PM
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taking a life is never an easy thing to do.

remorse is a good sign.



posted on Jun, 26 2013 @ 12:54 PM
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reply to post by camaro68ss
 


Bless your heart. I know what you are feeling.

When I was a teenager, I was with my boyfriend at his ranch. Before then, I have never handled a gun. He handed me his gun to teach me. There was a rabbit in the distance and he told me to aim for it. In some freak twist of 'luck' I made the shot and hit the rabbit but did not kill it. It let out the worst sound I've ever heard like a wheezing scream and made a dash into the brush. His dogs went after it and finished it off.

WTF? Why did I do it? What harm was that little rabbit doing to me? What was going through my mind? Why such a needless use of an innocent creature as target practice? What was wrong with me that I picked up a gun and shot one of God's animals so carelessly?

I was never able to forgive myself and to this day I make it my mission to 'harm none' including insects. I would only make an exception for self defense.

I don't hunt, fish, kill bugs, and as of recently, converted to veganism. I just don't like the thought of taking another creature's life force to sustain my own. That rabbit incident haunts me to this day. If I had a time machine, I'd go back and club myself in the back of the head with a 2x4 to prevent me from shooting the rabbit.





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