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Saturn gets a shock

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posted on Nov, 6 2004 @ 11:33 PM
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Saturn gets a shock
A team of space scientists from France and the US has taken the first ever images of a geomagnetic storm on Saturn. The team believe that the storm was caused by an interplanetary shock wave that can be traced back to a coronal mass ejection at the Sun. The team has also been able to detect the effects of the shock on the Earth and Jupiter before it reached Saturn (R Prangé et al. 2004 Nature 432 78).

Geomagnetic or auroral storms happen on the Earth when the solar wind interacts with the geomagnetic field. However, coronal mass ejections -- violent eruptions on the surface of the Sun -- can trigger interplanetary shock waves that compress the Earth's magnetosphere and lead to auroral storms. These storms are routinely monitored by the "Space Weather" satellites. Other planets with magnetic fields also experience geomagnetic storms but these are difficult to observe.

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posted on Nov, 7 2004 @ 10:21 AM
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woow
That's amazing but I don't want to survive this storm on Earth!!!Ihave a qestion is it dangerous for people??



posted on Nov, 7 2004 @ 10:34 AM
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Originally posted by Hidden
woow
That's amazing but I don't want to survive this storm on Earth!!!Ihave a qestion is it dangerous for people??

Too late. f you read the third sentence, it said "The team has also been able to detect the effects of the shock on the Earth and Jupiter before it reached Saturn" .

So we've all survived hundreds of these during our lifetimes.

They might disrupt our satellites and they make for lovely aurora borealis (and aurora austrailalis) displays.



posted on Nov, 7 2004 @ 03:14 PM
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Originally posted by Hidden
woow
That's amazing but I don't want to survive this storm on Earth!!!Ihave a qestion is it dangerous for people??


As Byrd said, we've lived through hundreds of these in our lifetimes. The worst is that if a big one hits Earth it could knock out electrical systems for a spell.


E_T

posted on Nov, 8 2004 @ 03:57 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd
They might disrupt our satellites and they make for lovely aurora borealis (and aurora austrailalis) displays.
Actually they can completely break electronics in satellite (if not protected) and damage power networks... not that blackouts would be totally bad, peoples even in cities might notice something in sky.






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