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Moth mimics a spider--and other mimics in nature

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posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 09:44 AM
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It's no secret by now that I'm terrified of spiders. Unluckily for me, other insects are capable of mimicking them as a defense mechanism. I'd certainly think twice before swatting this harmless moth, that is, if I'm ever in Thailand.


It has wings lighter than a feather and is one of the most delicate creatures on earth.

But this tiny moth can frighten off predators far bigger then[sic] itself - with its scary spider-like markings.

www.dailymail.co.uk...




The fascinating bug was discovered in Thailand in 2005...But this spider moth species is a dramatic example of how one species can reap benefits from mimicking or looking like another species.

www.dailymail.co.uk...


I think it's fascinating that a creatures' evolution can lead to it taking on properties of a different plant or animal. Does this say something about an evolutionary hierarchy? "I shoulda been a spider!"

Can you think of any other creatures that mimic others as part of a survival mechanism? I'll get the ball rolling with the uncanny mimic octopus!



While I wait for you biology fans out there to post, I'll add another more common critter, the walking stick!

...these masters of camouflage have evolved to look just like the twigs of a tree or shrub, which is where they find their habitat. It's almost impossible to spot them because their mimicry is so excellent.

blogs.discovery.com...



Okay, I'll add one more! This one is more an example of mimicry of environment--camouflage.

The arctic fox is able to change colors with the changing seasons, from a brown hue in the summer months to a snow white during winter. Because of this simple, seasonal adaptation, the arctic fox is able to sneak up on prey and hide from predators, like the polar bear.

www.greenfudge.org...




mimicry is fast becoming a model system for studying evolution. It is ideally suited to this task because both the selection pressure (predation) and the traits under selection are clear. Indeed, mimicry demonstrates the process of evolution in its most stripped-down form.

www.scientificamerican.com...




(Did an ATS search with absolutely no results of the like. Forgive me if this has been posted.)


edit on 2-6-2013 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 10:21 AM
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Wow! That octopus is CRAZY! I'd never heard of it before. I thought it was a spoof until I looked it up!


Here's a caterpillar, whose bum looks like the head of a snake.





posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 06:25 PM
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That spider is awesome and I have never seen it.

Cool creatures for sure, and I was immediately reminded of the transforming owl from some time ago.

Love the predator look at 1:17

Another owl:

I like this fella too:

edit on 2-6-2013 by speculativeoptimist because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2013 @ 04:34 AM
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reply to post by speculativeoptimist
 


Oh, that owl is amazing! I had no idea birds could even do anything like that. What a majestic and lovely animal. Thanks for sharing it with the thread.



edit on 3-6-2013 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2013 @ 10:06 AM
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Wow...just wow.

How come we didn't get camo as an ability? Damn....



posted on Jun, 3 2013 @ 02:47 PM
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Originally posted by Gazrok
Wow...just wow.

How come we didn't get camo as an ability? Damn....


Alas, I'm afraid we're just boring old humans


However, we ARE the only species on the planet that uses 'culture' as a means of environmental adaptation. So, we are pretty special in that manner. We can't automatically camouflage to our surroundings? Well, darn it, we'll make some camo gear and develop stealth techniques instead



edit on 3-6-2013 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2013 @ 04:37 PM
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reply to post by NarcolepticBuddha
 


Hardly the same. One second, it was a reef plant...the next, an octopus. That was pretty damn freaky. The Predator would be proud!



posted on Jun, 3 2013 @ 08:14 PM
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with crap like that in the world it's amazing we were able to evolve at all. lol



posted on Jun, 5 2013 @ 03:20 AM
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Originally posted by NarcolepticBuddha
make some camo gear and develop stealth techniques instead



new technology is inspired by the same natural phenomena responsible for desert mirages. Heated via electrical stimulation, the sharp temperature gradient between the cloak and the surrounding area causes a steep temperature gradient that bends light away from the wearer. The catch: Wearers must love water and be able to fit inside a petri dish.
[link]

oh technology... now we are almost chameleon ready...
spot them...



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