One-Third of U.S. Honeybee Colonies Died Last Winter, Threatening Food Supply

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posted on May, 10 2013 @ 11:19 AM
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reply to post by loam
 


The evil people who are behind this poisoning of bees and therefore our food supply, are moving towards controlling our food supply. A few years ago I was puzzled over reports of massive seed banks being stocked with every kind of seeds. I wondered what all that was about. Not so puzzling now that years later, bee colonies are dying off and a sustainable food supply is at serious risk - because soon the only seeds available will be the hoarded seeds in those seed banks. Just think how much they could have hoarded over all these years.

When they begin to withold food from us, and when we become hungry and desperate and have nothing left, no work, no home, no rights, no freedom, and no food, we will realise material possessions are not vital to a happy life. Their hold on us with regard to financial/material things will be over, so they have to starve us into submission by poisoning bees, and rendering everyone unable to even grow their own food. But poverty, hunger, desperation and frustration will give us the strength and the courage to join together, rise up and by force TAKE BACK our God given right to food, water, freedom, and a peaceful life.

This will happen. Their days are numbered.




posted on May, 10 2013 @ 11:37 AM
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This has been going on for quite a while. Over the past few years there has been reports of bee die offs.
As an avid outdoor person, hiker, photographer, etc, I have not seen a single honey bee all year. I have seen a few bumblebees, a couple wasp, a billion friggen ticks and a couple yellow jackets. Most people don't even realize this is happening.

Its probably a variety of things, but I think all the modifications to plants are the main culprit. Non natural poisons infecting the bee colonies.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 11:50 AM
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Bee Keepers report that when they put their beehives near cell phone towers, the bees die off quickly or leave.

Pesticides, EM fields, and other unknown contributors are killing off bees at an alarming rate, and it appears to be an elephant in the room that no one wants to talk about.

By the time major crops stop getting pollenated, it will be too late.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:15 PM
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reply to post by Theflyingweldsman
 


Great idea in your pics!
That would seem a good way to pick the place
where they would hive too, rather than someplace
close to the house. Better for them, and us!



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:24 PM
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Wow, so many apiarists on ATS--who'd have thought??

In Australia our native bee populations have been shrinking, as well as losses of honeybees. I have heard about a fungal infection killing off bees in North America, but from what Im told so far that fungus is not present here in AU?

So which company(s) have a vested interest in HFCS honey "substitutes"??? There we have motive...



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 01:56 PM
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reply to post by sunnybrae
 


True, and you could plant a herb garden or a milkweed bush beside it,

so they don't have to go far for food



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 02:00 PM
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I hate seeing these threads on dying bees, they make me depressed. I suppose I could ignore them but I would like to know if new evidence is coming out and if a solution is being implemented so they will stop dying. It always seems to be disappointing news.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


There is a solution, Rickymaus


Save the Bees



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 02:30 PM
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Originally posted by loam
Forget causation arguments for now... It looks like we'll have more immediate consequences to worry about. It wont take much.

Alarmist nonsense. Most of the problem is caused by poor management by the commercial honey bee industry, and they'll either fix it or go broke. Anyway, there are still plenty of wild honeybees and other pollinating critters out there completely unaffected by this stuff, and manual pollination is a common agricultural practice. Nobody is going without food for this reason. People only starve in this world these days because of political reasons.



posted on May, 11 2013 @ 08:42 AM
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Alarmist nonsense. Most of the problem is caused by poor management by the commercial honey bee industry, and they'll either fix it or go broke. Anyway, there are still plenty of wild honeybees and other pollinating critters out there completely unaffected by this stuff, and manual pollination is a common agricultural practice. Nobody is going without food for this reason. People only starve in this world these days because of political reasons.


Exactly. TN Farm Bureau has 23,018 registered colony's with above 80% health as of this morning 5/11/2013. That is up from 20,098 from last year on this date.

Domesticated Bee colony's account for 1/3 of all crop pollination in TN. The rest is taken on by a host of pollinators and over 80 known wild species can fill this void in any bee die off.

The concern is for the keepers and their losses as it relates to the total amount of production of Agribusiness in the state-not the bees themselves as they are not native to the state.

Persons go into the beekeeping business and fail naturally blame anything except their own inexperience and lack of business skills. When the corn tassels here in mid July(normally that is) millions of bees and other pollinators will be present and not a single one will be domesticated.



posted on May, 11 2013 @ 08:49 AM
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Originally posted by kaylaluv
No shortage of bees where I live, in Central Texas. There are TONS of bees hanging around my flowering vines right now on my back patio. I'm talking hundreds and hundreds - you can hear the hum as soon as you open the back door. I'm waiting for the flowers to start dropping off my vines before I go out there to plant in my pots and beds. There are just too many bees and they make me nervous!


It's snowing here. I still had snowbanks before it started. Everything is white now. The bees are endangered here this year more from the long winter than anything. These Yooper Bees have it hard.



posted on May, 11 2013 @ 09:15 AM
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I believe the death of wild bees is an agenda from the GMOs producers to start their own manufacturing bees.

Blamed for Bee Collapse, Monsanto Buys Leading Bee Research Firm


Monsanto, the massive biotechnology company being blamed for contributing to the dwindling bee population, has bought up one of the leading bee collapse research organizations. Recently banned from Poland with one of the primary reasons being that the company’s genetically modified corn may be devastating the dying bee population, it is evident that Monsanto is under serious fire for their role in the downfall of the vital insects. It is therefore quite apparent why Monsanto bought one of the largest bee research firms on the planet.


naturalsociety.com...

So control the company that is investigating the Bees collapse so nobody can learn the truth about who is killing bees.

Then start creating your own GMO bees anpollinating polinaton.

Now, every year, I watch bees pollinating my garden they love my holly bushes, when in bloom, but this year I noticed something different, the bees didn't look healthy, their wings were translucent and their bodies where no the pretty yellow and black but they look like they had a black mold on them, a few weeks later I found many death bees in my guarden and all of them had that translucent look and black mold on them

This is the first time I noticed that.

I live in GA and bees are a big thing around my neck of the woods and is a lot of bee growers in the state.





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