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Blessed Beltane, ATS!

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posted on May, 5 2013 @ 07:18 PM
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Hey there, ATS folks. I would like to extend the spirit of Beltane to the community here. Normally, it's celebrated on May 1st but I've had some crazy career changes (good things) that made me postpone my revelries. Fortunately, the sentiments can extend throughout the whole week. Also, as with the other Sabbats I have in my signature, I will give some ideas on how to celebrate it even if you aren't a witch and some secular ways for it to help you balance your life throughout the Wheel of the Year.




Basically, in my path, Beltane is the celebration of the goddess (maiden aspect) and the god (young aspect) joining in a loving union. In secular terms, it is a celebration of nature's consummation and promise to bring us a new cornucopia of life. The ancient Celts also used this as a time to placate a god called Belenus to get his blessings for protection of their families and crops.




What you should contemplate on during the first few days of May is the concept of a promise. Earth makes a promise to you every year when she announces Spring that there will be new crops and new generations. The very air she breaths carry the seeds where they need to go and even carry pheromones to our noses so we are more inclined to reproduce ourselves. This promise is something that has never been broken. Sometimes it may be postponed like during an ice age or a global catastrophe but the fact there is still life on our planet is proof they she has never broken it. So, think of promises you can make to Earth! Say you will do something special for her.




During our festivals, there are parades and rituals that honor both the goddess and the god. Much of the celebration is focused on being an analog. Depending on your coven or group, this can mean a great number of things. Personally, I simply celebrate this as a figurative Sabbat and leave the literal part to me and the wife.
Here are some great shots of the Beltane festival in Edinburgh during some of the white queen processions (name varies) -









Activities for Beltane -

Flowers and Beads - String them! If you never know how you should decorate your house this time of year, try to make some garlands or other decorations out of beads and flowers. Just pick some nice greenery (with permission and gratitude, of course) and place it in your home.

May Day Baskets - You can make little baskets filled with flowers and hang them on the neighbor's door. If it catches on, maybe it will become a neighborhood tradition.

Bonfire and Jumping - What many traditions do is make a bonfire and then leap over it. If you do, make a wish as you go. The leaping itself is a blessing that protects your crops (or whatever secures your livelihood like tools or a car, etc) but if you leap over with your spouse or partner, it will grant you protection for your family and increase the happiness in the bedroom.

May Pole - Dancing around the Maypole has been a pastime. Typically, it was done the morning after the Beltane activities. Let's be blunt. It's a giant phallus, representing male virility that impregnates the Earth. But basically, so is a business tower in Manhattan. This is still kid-friendly, however, because it's a fun dance and it's a celebration of the "circle of life".




So there you have it. That's Beltane in a nutshell and hopefully enough to get you on your way if you ever want to begin celebrating equinoxes, solstices, and cross quarters (in other words, Sabbats). Just remember, you don't need to give up your beliefs in order to celebrate the cycles we enjoy year to year. I'm sure your god, goddess, or whatever you want to call it will appreciate you celebrating in their honor.

Happy Beltane!




posted on May, 5 2013 @ 08:12 PM
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Beautiful post! I love it.

"May the circle be open, but unbroken"
"May the peace of the Goddess be forever in your heart!"
"Merry Meet and Merry Part and Merry Meet again!"

Blessed Beltaine Cuervo.

Cirque



posted on May, 5 2013 @ 09:14 PM
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Blessed Beltane to you. That was quite interesting.




posted on May, 5 2013 @ 09:36 PM
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reply to post by Cuervo
 


Just a few questions:

What is the role of "being an analog"?

Can you give us a rundown of the costumes in the colored photos? They seem interesting. (especially the purple painted faces with the blue arrow, the antlered person, the moss covered person, and the people in black with red faces) What are their roles and costumes meant to represent? Is there a hierarchy in these covens that dictates each persons role in the participation of the ceremonies?
edit on 5/5/2013 by Bleeeeep because: typos, always typos



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 02:13 AM
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Originally posted by Bleeeeep
reply to post by Cuervo
 


Just a few questions:

What is the role of "being an analog"?

Can you give us a rundown of the costumes in the colored photos? They seem interesting. (especially the purple painted faces with the blue arrow, the antlered person, the moss covered person, and the people in black with red faces) What are their roles and costumes meant to represent? Is there a hierarchy in these covens that dictates each persons role in the participation of the ceremonies?
edit on 5/5/2013 by Bleeeeep because: typos, always typos


That's a ton of questions. "being an analog" means they are performing things that are analogous to the Sabbat. So, in this case, they are fertility themes. Don't jump to conclusions and assume we all just get naked and have orgies. Virtually all communities and covens keep sex between established partners and couples. The act can be symbolized in many ways. Much like the eating the wafers at communion. A Christian isn't literally eating Jesus nor are they really gulping down his blood.

The costumes are often coven-specific but I can tell you about a couple that are pretty universal. The moss covered guy is probably "Green Man" (not Charlie from Always Sunny, mind you) who is sort of like nature personified. You probably have seen a face statue of him in many gardens and just about any garden section of a department store. The antlered dude is dressed as The Horned God and most likely, given the region (England), Cernunnos. The different colors are customary to the season and Sabbat.

Keep in mind that May 1st pagan celebrations come from a variety of cultures and customs. A Beltane festival in your home town may look similar to the one in the pictures but you would also have some of your own flare and tradition. Sort of like how Germans and Americans celebrate Christmas differently.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 08:30 PM
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a reply to: Cuervo

And here we go again. Blessed Beltane 2014!



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