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Bugging out on a budget (the 3 day trek)

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posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 02:51 PM
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First of all, yes, I know there are TONS of BOB threads....this isn't one of them.
This also isn't about going into the woods to survive indefinitely.

This is strictly about getting to a location within 3 days, whether it's your home (and you have a long commute by car) or to some other kind of safe place/friend's house, etc.

Whether this is for a BOB (Bug Out Bag) or just stuff in your car, this is about things to always have handy, and how to do it even if you are on a strict budget, like even flipping burgers at Mickey D's..... This also assumes you don't have any kind of harsh weather. If that is the case, your NEEDED things get added on for that too.

First, it's important to realize the NEEDED things:

WATER - You'll die without it.
FOOD - You'll suffer without it. (for the 3 days)
INFORMATION - You'll waste time and energy without it.

Everything else is gravy, really.

WATER - Some kind of sturdy container that has a lid. Can be as simple as an old small Gatorade bottle, or as good as a metal canteen. For the latter, Army/Navy stores have actual old surplus of these, often for a good price. The bonus to a metal one, is the ability to boil water in it. Do NOT use a regular store bought bottled water bottle...these are entirely flimsy, and don't hold up well. Barring this, you can get a metal canteen cup for less than $10.

Optional:

I also like to carry a small bottle of Mio water enhancer, for flavoring the water. (WalMart has a store brand one that is about a buck cheaper too).

Water purification aids. Water tablets (about $5), Water purification straws (as cheap as $11)

Foraging Sources:

Apart from natural water sources (fresh water lakes, rivers), toilet tanks would work (provided the water supply isn't tainted from the SHTF event), not the bowls, of course. Ponds in the city would be a poor choice. If in a city, better off with the toilet tank idea. Also, check garden hoses. Often, there is a lot of water still in a hose when the faucet is turned off.

FOOD-If you don't eat, you'll feel miserable and have less energy to make your trek. Any type of cereal bar/breakfast bar that keeps for a long time, is a good idea. These can be relatively cheap (for the calories and nutrients provided), but of course, not as satisfying as a cooked meal. Still, this is about just getting someplace, not eating like a king.

Optional:

Cooking. If you want to cook, you need heat or fire (which also adds the need for a way to make fire or light Sterno). A cheap and easy solution is getting a little Sterno camping, folding stove. These are about $10 and then a couple bucks for a Sterno can. You can cook a can of food over it, right in the can, easily enough, but it will take longer than it does on a normal stove. Still, canned food is cheap enough. Also, there are lots of options that can be eaten cold, even though not as tasty. Still though, cheap. Also, Sterno isn't very visible, and not a bunch of smoke, so won't immediately give you away like a full fire will. If you do go with cans, get a military can opener. They are cheap, and small, and easy to carry, and you can get them at stores selling camping gear, or online for just a couple of bucks.

Foraging Sources:

Edible plants if you can identify them (see the info section), and most insects. Sure, I know many are squeamish about eating bugs, but eh...just avoid the brightly colored ones. Of course, you can always try abandoned stores, etc. but probably more risk than it is worth. Most people aren't hunters, but this is always an option too, though for 3 days, really?

INFORMATION- Perhaps the most important. This actually breaks down into different areas.

Your Route- A paper map, kept inside a ziploc bag. Should be of the area you'll need to traverse to get to your destination. Mark out different routes, so you have some alternates. Identify key areas on your map (such as where you may be able to forage certain resources)...along each route. I kind of have a color code myself, so it isn't so obvious to others.

Survival Info-Always charge your cell phone. If you have a smart phone, download some survival books, especially any with info and pics (color) of edible plants for your area. Sure, cell service may be down, but if a book is saved on your phone, you should have access to the info, at least for a couple of days with a full charge, without using other apps.

Phone Numbers/Addresses/Other Info-Today, we usually have all of this in our phones, but without power, we simply don't know. An old-fashioned black book can be invaluable. Land line phones may still work, and addresses can help you find a location on a map. Other info like phone numbers for insurance, account numbers (coded), etc. can be good too, and help in case it isn't a real SHTF scenario, but more like a temporary one.

GRAVY-The above is the absolute essential list. Now, here are some suggested additions.

DUCT TAPE - There are more uses for this than I can count. From bandaging wounds, to securing a prisoner, helping make a shelter, etc., lots of uses for one item.

BANDANA - Google on all the things you can do with a bandana, just so many uses...

PONCHO - even a dollar store one will keep the rain off, but I recommend spending a few more bucks on a more durable one. Rain can suck, especially if it keeps coming down, and this cheap investiment can keep you pretty dry.

BACKPACK - You can get a cheap backpack at WalMart or other stores for less than $20 (sometimes less than $10). We're only talking 3 days here, so doesn't have to be a big investment.

FIRST AID - Most small travel kits are good, and less than $10. Or, you can piece together your own cheap enough, at a dollar store. Concentrate on different size band-aids, some anti-bacterial spray or ointment, and some butterfly bandages, and a tube of super glue gel (bonds skin instantly, so with some butterfly bandages, can be almost as good as stitches).

FIRE - Water/Wind Proof Matches, can get these cheap enough at any place that sells camping gear. Even a cheap lighter is good to have too. Put some dryer lint in a ziploc bag, and you'll have tinder too.

KNIFE - You'll find a myriad of uses for a knife. You can get a cheap knife, but expect it will eventually crap out. Still, we only need it for 3 days, so.... This is really though, the one thing I'll say you get what you pay for. I personally like to have a Swiss Army style one (cheap knockoffs are around $5-$10) and a good survival knife (like a hunting or combat knife). Try and get a "full tang" for the latter (where the blade extends into the handle).

SHELTER - I really didn't mention this as a need, because this depends on where you are...and we are only talking about 3 days. Take your season and climate into consideration here. In most cases, a cheap shiny survival blanket works fine, and is just a few bucks (under $10).

CASH - Try and have some spare cash on you, at least $20 and in assorted bills. I also like to have a roll of quarters (in addition to change for things that still may work, a roll makes a good solid fist when held). Cash may still work for something..depending on the SHTF event.

WEAPON - A firearm isn't really a "budget" item, but if you can find a used gun for a cheap price, all the better...especially if you can buy it cash from a private seller that you may trust. That's really a whole other thread, but throwing it out there.




posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 02:52 PM
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Ran out of characters, so just a note to add any cheap suggestions you've found for your own kits. By "cheap" I mean less than $20.

edit on 22-4-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 03:15 PM
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Good read, thank you. About the only thing I can think of to add that you can get for cheap and throw in a 3-day pack is some sort of rope, preferably paracord.



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 03:26 PM
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I like your thread!

As for some cheap (less than $20) ideas for various needs....I'm a backpacker so know how to use various things for more than one purpose, and not necessarily the purpose for which it was designed.
That said...here are a few ideas.....

Bandanas-- can be used to filter large particles out of questionable water, before treating. Can be used (for girls) for TP. Can be used for the normal purposes. Can also be used to give yourself a bath with a small amount of water, should you find yourself in need of cleaning up-- but it IS only 3 days, right?

Xtra pair of sox- Your feet are your foundation. Change your sox out when you notice your feet are getting sweaty to help prevent blisters, should you need to walk some distance.

Water Treatment- Aqua Mira ($12) To treat water to the level where all the stuff that can make you sick, is dead. Very lightweight too!! A small cup for dipping water out of small locations (puddles) is also a handy thing to have.
If you are creative, one of those straw devices can be rigged into a "gravity drip" water filter if the water has got alot of silt and stuff in it. Don't forget to backflush the filter with some clean water when you are done to keep it functioning longer.

Shelter...Better than a survival blanket, grab a tarp out of the garage if you have one. They are a bit more durable should you run across nasty weather in your 3 day soujourn. We have a nice tent that will take us pretty much through anything one could think of.

Food- Most folks can scrounge enough food for 3 days out of their own cabinets, even if they have to be a bit creative. To have some stashed, I'd rely on some freeze dried stuff, to make it easier, and to make sure you get enough vitamins and minerals to keep your energy levels up. If one wants things to be cheaper, perhaps dehydrating your own meals would be an option. You could get together with some friends and share the cost of a dehydrator if necessary.

Fire- Fire is always important, whether to cook food or dry out your clothes, or even warm up. If one needs to start a fire, storm proof matches are great, but even better is a fire stick. Water won't bother one of those at all, and you can even start a fire in the rain. A plastic baggie with some cotton balls soaked in vaseline work great to help you start a fire if you need to.

For a stove,there is the sterno option as well as the Esbit option, when you are talking cheap. Esbit uses fuel "tablets" on a base that holds your small pan. They also take a longer time than conventional stoves do. There are some out there now NEAR the 20$ range that are the faster ones that use canned Iso-butane. A small can of isobutane and one of those stoves would easily get you through your 3 day trip.They have the advantage of using a small flame concentrated on a small area, cooking food fast, thereby minimizing your risk of being spotted, if that is an issue for you. They are also easily hidden, say behind a fallen log, where it wouldn't be spotted by passers-by.

Backpack- I don't use a cheap backpack, so I don't know what is available out there at present. My current go to bag is a 43 liter pack that weighs in at 1.5lb and is very comfortable no matter what I stuff in it!!

Weaponry- I think that carrying a short distance pistol would probably be my best bet if I was travelling thru urban areas. In rural areas, a rifle or shotgun would come in handy, for that happenstance that one should run across something large enough for a meal. I really think this one is a personal choice and need option that one should think about very carefully.

RainGear- There is some cheap raingear out there called "Frogg Toggs". Top and bottom, less than $20 and perfect for a 3 day trip.

I think this sums up what I would take for a 3 day trip if I had to do it on the cheap. Just some ideas of course.

SK
edit on 4/22/2013 by SweetKarma because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 03:59 PM
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Shelter...Better than a survival blanket, grab a tarp out of the garage if you have one. They are a bit more durable should you run across nasty weather in your 3 day soujourn. We have a nice tent that will take us pretty much through anything one could think of.


The downside to these is weight. Even a tarp takes up a lot of space and weight. A tent, even more so. In my area, this really wouldn't be needed, except for worrying about rain.

One more GRAVY item though....TP, toilet paper.



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 04:59 PM
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TP isn't even a necessity. One can learn to use the things in nature for that purpose, if you have a mind to.

Yes a tarp can be heavy. But I think we were going on the vison of "cheap" vs "lightweight". Alot depends on your mode of transportation out of there. A tent is usually MUCH lighter than a tarp- have you checked out the lightweight backpacker's sites? My one man (plus gear and the dog) tent, made of cuben fiber, weighs in at a whopping 1lb. even- stakes n all. My tarptents weigh in at 1.5lb for a silnylon tent for 1 (2 in a pinch) man tent. My 2 man tent that has vestibules that allow one to see as well as cook under them, weighs in at a whopping 2.5lb. Cuben fiber is expensive, silnylon, not so much so. Heck there are even patterns to make your own tarptent online should you consider rising to that challenge.



SK



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 05:38 PM
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dental floss! Use for fishing line,rope,thread for repairs,you name it.And its super strong!



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by blkcwbyhat
 


And let's not forget the all inclusive -- Duck Tape!! ;-)



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 10:19 PM
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As long as we're talking a three-ish day trek, I'd included a flashlight.
I really like a 4-d maglight, although heavy.
It's bright enough and can carry an extra bulb.

I wrap the handle with para-cord, and then wrap that with duct tape.
I fit about 40 ft. of para cord, and 50 ft. of duct tape right on the handle, which keeps the handle warm, let's you access para cord and duct tape, and provides great grip if needed as a weapon.
I also wrap about 150 ft. of "Spider Wire" brand braided fishing line at the bottom, and secure that with several elastic ponytail holders.

If the batteries go dead, or flashlight fails, you still have a waterproof tube for kindling, foraged food, bit of water, etc.



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 10:31 PM
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reply to post by blkcwbyhat
 


Look into braided fishing line, it's so much stronger.
Can be used as thread, for snares, stitches, fishing line, etc.

Stronger and thinner than floss, for sure.



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 11:02 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


Thank you Gazrok. I have built my whole BOB on a budget.
For this thread, I can contribute a free map each US state.

Free State Maps Guide

My map was two years old so I filled this out a couple of weeks ago when it was posted on the website, Hey, It's Free! My map came super fast!



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 11:36 PM
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Candles...I get mine from the dollar store. Can get a pack of 6 for a buck. When I was in Iceland, we were told to keep candles and a coffee can. Place the candle inside and the can will help radiate heat. You can even use candles to assist in fire making, especially when using wet tinder. Find 3 forked sticks. Place forked sticks in a triangle with 3 sticks upon the forks. Place small kindling across the sticks to make a platform and an open area underneath. Layer more sticks, but keep them no bigger than pinky width. Place your bigger sticks in a teepee style over the forked stick platform. Light the candle and place inside the open area. Feed your wet tinder over the candle until the small kindling dries out and catches fire. With a little practice, you won't need the candle and will be able to use any combustible material under the platform...wet or dry.

Get a device to capture water from hot water heaters. People almost always forget they exist.



posted on Apr, 23 2013 @ 12:08 AM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


The best advise I can give to any prepper if to buy as good as you can afford.


If you cheap out on certain items it could cost you your life. Clothing and shelter and the ability to get clean water come to mind. If you can avoid buying anything made in China I would do it. Why you ask? Because it will break in the long run.


And always remember the rule of........3. 3 minutes without air............3 hours without shelter.......3 days without water........3 weeks without food.




The best cheap shelter is a army surplus poncho with woobie liner. It is only 30 bucks and will save your life in a cold rain.
edit on 23-4-2013 by SubTruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 23 2013 @ 12:16 AM
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Originally posted by ChuckNasty
Candles...I get mine from the dollar store. Can get a pack of 6 for a buck. When I was in Iceland, we were told to keep candles and a coffee can. Place the candle inside and the can will help radiate heat. You can even use candles to assist in fire making, especially when using wet tinder. Find 3 forked sticks. Place forked sticks in a triangle with 3 sticks upon the forks. Place small kindling across the sticks to make a platform and an open area underneath. Layer more sticks, but keep them no bigger than pinky width. Place your bigger sticks in a teepee style over the forked stick platform. Light the candle and place inside the open area. Feed your wet tinder over the candle until the small kindling dries out and catches fire. With a little practice, you won't need the candle and will be able to use any combustible material under the platform...wet or dry.

Get a device to capture water from hot water heaters. People almost always forget they exist.

-Awesome. I was going to say the same.

Living in the North where winters can be harsh and being a "commuter" for many years (driving 1.5 hours each way into the city) I ALWAYS kept candles and a Metal Coffee can with me. A good thick candle inside the can will heat the car to a bearable level for 3 days or more without having to run the heat- Even camping (while a bit dangerous) I have used this setup to warm a 5 man tent during a crazy and unexpected cold snap...

-I now would keep some dryer lint (like from a clothes dryer) in a ziplock baggie and a 9V battery (for a BOB)- I saw an amazing video of firestarting by rubbing the battery nodes on the lint. Tested it during a downpour outside and was able to start a roaring campfire in the pouring rain in less than 3 mins without any paper, lighter, etc... It could come in handy and worked like a charm.



posted on Apr, 23 2013 @ 09:09 AM
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reply to post by SubTruth
 



Why you ask? Because it will break in the long run.


Right, but this isn't about the "long run", it's about a 3 day trek to your safe zone. If on a budget, this may mean you are going to a prepper friend's place, someone else who has spent the money and time to prepare for something.

I have some friends who plan to come to our place if anything ever goes down. On average, they are about an hour's drive from us, so I originally made this list as a help to them...for things they should get on their own, to make the trip to us.

When it comes to things to have at your safe place, I'll agree. Get the best you can afford...but for just getting here? Cheap is fine...it doesn't have to last.

Light is a nice GRAVY item, but it's not really a necessity. I would advise my friends not to try and travel by night in most circumstances. Can you imagine night, without power, for example? Nothing but moon and star light? Way too dangerous, and way too easy to get lost. That'd be the time to rest and bed down.

Don't get me wrong, there are LOTS of other "gravy" items I carry in my own BOB, but when making the list for my friends, I just wanted to ensure they had the basics, and in what order. There is simply no reason they can't assemble the bare essential "BOB" I mentioned in the OP, no matter how poor they are, if they really want to be prepared to come here. I love my friends, and I want them to be safe should anything wacky come to pass.


And always remember the rule of........3. 3 minutes without air............3 hours without shelter.......3 days without water........3 weeks without food.


I always disagreed with the shelter rule though....that all depends on where you are. I can't think of ANY time in Florida, where 3 hours without shelter would kill you, and in a trek situation, shelter in Florida is as easy as getting under some trees. For other climates (and seasons), shelter will elevate into the NEED category, but not here.
edit on 23-4-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 23 2013 @ 11:03 AM
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Just a few tips..

You can replace your shoelaces with paracord, so it is always on hand (You can retie the laces with a single strand or so after removing the cord). Hoodies or anything with a drawstring works too.

Sugar, you need it. If you cant get food, getting cold or just need that extra go.. You can also get glucose tablets cheap.

Coffee for the same reason. Just cheap sachet's will do.

A solar phone case which charges the phone. You can easily leave it on there, they are cheap on ebay and will be there when you need it. (If there is no network or you want to save battery, remember the airplane mode) You can also get hand cranked dynamos for phones for a few dollars.

Documents. It is best to carry them, or copies at all times. You can also keep a copy on a thumbdrive or phone. Safest would probably be on a memory card which fits your phone that you can produce on demand.

Charcloth, made from some old jeans will ignite with a spark, just keep it as dry as you can. (Silica gel sachet would be an idea) Tutorial, how to make it



posted on Apr, 23 2013 @ 06:15 PM
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Leather gloves would also be a good addition to the 3day pack. You can get a good pair for 10bucks...or a crappy pair for 3.

I'd also add a cheap machete- 5bucks at Harbor Freight.

If you have little ones with you, might want to get a few chem lights at the dollar store. Help keep track of them at night - if you travel at night.

Suggest getting a few packets of an electrolyte drink mix to treat heat symptoms.

Sling shot - the wrist rocket style. You can get them cheap on BudK. With the steel shot balls, it is deadly.



posted on May, 1 2013 @ 01:50 PM
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Loving the paracord shoelace idea...that's sheer genius!





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