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Syrian Electronic Army claims credit for CBS Twitter accounts hack

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posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 07:39 PM
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Syrian Electronic Army claims credit for CBS Twitter accounts hack


www.slashgear.com

Yesterday, several of CBS’s Twitter accounts were hacked, including its main account, and its accounts for 60 Minutes, 48 Hours, and CBS Denver. The hackers got into the account and tweeted a series of things relating to President Obama and the United States being in cahoots with Al-Qaeda. The tweets also had links that led users to malware-infested sites.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 07:39 PM
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I was reading this earlier, and I just caught the update while going through my 'rounds'. Lol. So, apparently the "Syrian Electronic Army" has claimed responsibility for hacking several CBS related accounts.



The groups stated that they used the hacked accounts and “published through it the truth”.

Ok, so I don't think anybody is going to take this too seriously, and neither do I. But I think it's interesting that especially with all the 'underground' speculation regarding the Boston Bombing suspect(s), Syria would attempt to inform the public of our "Shadow Govt." by tweeting things in relation to the event. According to their website, which can be found here, the goal of the SEA is to fight "against the campaigns led by the Arab media and Western on our Republic by broadcasting fabricated news about what is happening in Syria."

Now, I just see this as an opportunity for them to use an event such as the 'BostonBombing', to gain credibility and turn the American public against our masters. LOL.

Compelling stuff none the less.



www.slashgear.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 08:02 PM
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Many people don't take the truth "too seriously".

That is why America is the way it is today. These guys deserve a round of applause, moreso than what was given in Boston this past week.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 08:22 PM
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Spreading The Word

Hacked? More likely they acquired the password used for all those accounts because it was bandied around in CBS emails sent to multiple recipients or similar carelessness.

Or maybe they guessed it, and it was something like "thisiscbs".

That's usually the real, untold story behind "hacking": bad password security.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 08:35 PM
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reply to post by TheNewRevolution
 

I completely agree with your sentiment, but what I personally meant when I said "and neither do I", was that I will be taking it with a grain of salt. Because no change will come of it; and stories like this tend to be overlooked most of the time.

Also, I did a search on the topic, and found an earlier thread with limited information and only a few replies. Maybe I should have put "Mentions Boston Marathon" in the title.


reply to post by Majic
 


Haha, I read somewhere that 60minutes shouldn't have made their password "tick tick tick."

edit on 21-4-2013 by iunlimited491 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 09:00 PM
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sounds more like Annoynomous getting into trouble and blamming it on someone else like usual,
even our good guys are bad.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 09:18 PM
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reply to post by WanderingThe3rd
 


Lol. No. I doubt it.

Anon is quick to take credit for their own actions. And plus, this was confirmed via the SEA's website.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 09:55 PM
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I'm more interested in what they had to say rather then them hacking. To me, that's where the real story is.

It' almost seems like every other day something is getting hacked.



posted on Apr, 21 2013 @ 10:35 PM
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reply to post by kimish
 


Agreed. And that's basically what I was trying to imply in the OP.

Anyone can consider themselves a hacker, obtaining someones password, etc. etc.

But what's fascinating to me, is the timing of it.

I mean, if they really wanted to correct 'disinfo' spread by the MSM; both Arabic and Western, about the situation there... They could have easily done this a while ago.

But I've also seen that a majority of their links contained Malware, which just about destroys their credibility.



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 12:02 AM
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YEAH!

Love the Syrian Electronic Army.

Hate CBS.




posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 12:42 AM
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reply to post by MrFantastic1
 


S.E.A. for life, bro!




posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 01:05 AM
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Originally posted by iunlimited491
reply to post by MrFantastic1
 


S.E.A. for life, bro!



Though, I have to admit, some of their targets seem odd or targets of opportunity. Like when they launched a DOS attack on the Dorchester, England fire department. Was like, "QUE?"



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 09:57 AM
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Originally posted by iunlimited491
reply to post by kimish
 
But what's fascinating to me, is the timing of it.

I mean, if they really wanted to correct 'disinfo' spread by the MSM; both Arabic and Western, about the situation there... They could have easily done this a while ago.

But I've also seen that a majority of their links contained Malware, which just about destroys their credibility.



It doesn't strike me as odd or fascinating, it strikes me as smart. There are more eyes glued onto various feeds because of what recently happened. If they were to do it on a regular, seemingly uneventful day, they wouldn't get as much exposure for having a tweet that'd be scrubbed relatively quickly.



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 11:19 AM
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Intriguing developments.... there's also been a schism among Anonymous, which triggered a hacker war... between OpSyria and Syrian Electronic Army.




Government troops and rebels in Syria are fighting in villages and cities, but the civil war is also being played out on the internet.

The cyber war is being fought on a global scale as internet warriors and hacker activists - called hacktivists - are forming cyber armies, according to a report by the security company McAfee.

The showdown focuses on the control of websites and on propaganda.

The Syrian Electronic Army supports President Bashar al-Assad. One of its members, an 18-year-old hacker, states on a blog with the Syrian internet domain ending .sy that he is "proud to be a pro-Assad hacker."

His "best achievements" include hacking the Harvard University website, as well as the systems of Arab television stations al-Jazeera and al-Arabiya, he says. The website of the Syrian Electronic Army, however, has also come under attack. A member of the pro-Israeli group ZionOps wrote in February that the website was easy to hack due to its outdated content management system, which had a number of security holes.

The Anonymous movement, under which the pro-rebel action OpSyria has formed, has also clashed with the Syrian Electronic Army. After Anonymous activists defaced the Syrian Defence Ministry's website, pro-al-Assad activists hacked into the homepage of the Anonymous platform AnonPlus, publishing photos of dead soldiers and saying Anonymous was siding with the Muslim Brotherhood by supporting the rebels.

"Syria is a very, very serious business. Don't # around with it," warned a website of OpSyria activists. The activists listed their own successes, including posting the statement "tango down permanently" on Syrian authorities' websites - an expression from war-like computer games such as Call of Duty announcing the death of an opponent.

The website said the activists had set the Syrian mobile communications company Syriatel as their "new priority." Another group, Telecomix, is adopting different tactics to support the Syrian opposition. "I consider defacing foolish. Distributed denials of service (attacks crippling websites by flooding them with data) are also not very productive," said Telecomix hacker and Berlin resident Stephan Urbach. "The Syrians know how bad their regime is," he says. Instead, Telecomix offers technical assistance to Syrians trying to secure free internet communication without being controlled by government censors.

Anonymous has a rule of not attacking the media, but an OpSyria website says an exception can be made when information from state media "harms the Syrian people." In such cases, a decision will be made based on discussions on the net and by "old, experienced Anons." The website of the official Syrian news agency SANA was temporarily shut down recently.

The other side, meanwhile, attacked the blogs site of the Reuters news agency last week, posting a fake interview that gave the impression that rebels had pulled out of Aleppo and other cities. "The propaganda has moved onto the web," Urbach conceded, but said it was absurd to speak of a "cyber war." "That only mocks the people who are killed in Syria."




This stuff's getting serious now!

Source
edit on 22/4/13 by Echtelion because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 12:57 PM
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reply to post by iunlimited491
 


Least somebody's telling the truth.



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 01:17 PM
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Originally posted by fusse

Originally posted by iunlimited491
reply to post by kimish
 
But what's fascinating to me, is the timing of it.

I mean, if they really wanted to correct 'disinfo' spread by the MSM; both Arabic and Western, about the situation there... They could have easily done this a while ago.

But I've also seen that a majority of their links contained Malware, which just about destroys their credibility.



It doesn't strike me as odd or fascinating, it strikes me as smart. There are more eyes glued onto various feeds because of what recently happened. If they were to do it on a regular, seemingly uneventful day, they wouldn't get as much exposure for having a tweet that'd be scrubbed relatively quickly.



I totally agree and let's hope this thought the media a good lesson, not that thit can happen to just anyone but the MSM too!



posted on Apr, 22 2013 @ 02:55 PM
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The hack is one thing, compromising a MSM network, adhering to their battle cry, etc. etc.

But lets be honest, I don't think we need Syrian hackers to help get us digging in our own backyard. Haha.
I mean, I think the term 'FalseFlag' must have shown up a few dozen times, just minutes after the first bang. Lol...

But even if there was any validity to their claim, I don't think they would be the leading source in telling the people what the actual "truth" is. As if they "know" in the first place.

It's kinda like, "Tell us something we don't know." Lolol.


I think they just seized an opportunity for people to listen, and gain some publicity.

edit on 22-4-2013 by iunlimited491 because: (no reason given)



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