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I have been told I need to have both knees replaced!

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posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 03:59 PM
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I am 65 years old in pretty good health. I am a non-smoker and very light drinker (one beer a week). No illicit drugs. In the course of participating in a weight loss program I discovered that my walking exercise became too painful to continue. I have lost 35 lbs. and need to lose another 50 lbs. The doctor has ordered 1.5 to 2 months of pre-op physical training to strengthen the knees.

Now here is what I am wondering. I have heard of great results and heard of bad results. I have heard of people having both done at the same time to get it over with but is that a reasonable idea? Has anyone who is reading this done that?

Any other info that would be useful to know would be appreciated.




posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 04:06 PM
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You dont have to use your knees to lose wight.

If i wear you I would look into how food can help your knees get stronger before dishing out a massive amount of money for surgery. Keep in mind hospitals do help people but they all so collect money. They are going to suggest you pay them a massive amount of money before they tell you how you can do it on your own.



posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 04:18 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 


I was in a car accident that did significant damage. I have seen the x-rays and seen the bone damage. If it was just cartilage damage I would pursue healing through natural and nutritional methods. I have changed my eating habits and I am eating healthy organic foods. I utilize a water filter and avoid as much processed food that contains preservative or aspartame.

I have endured knee pain since the accident in 2002. I have encountered episodes of depression and have toughed it out refusing to take pain meds which my body doesn't do well with anyway. I am tired of the pain and if surgery offers me some manner of relief I want it.



posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by grayeagle
 


I've had my left leg rebuilt several times. The last time they did a total on my knee.

I'd go one at a time because it would grant you more mobility sooner.

Any questions you have, U2U or simply ask. I'd be more than happy to "walk" you through the procedure.



posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by beezzer
 


Thanks Beezer! I received shots in both knees today before coming home and the absence of pain is wonderful! I know it will soon wear off until the cortisone kicks in but being able to get in an out of my car without pain is a incredible. As I think of questions I will u2u as you offered. I realize everybody heals differently but may I ask about how long your initial recovery was?



posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by grayeagle
 


I was back to work in 6 weeks.

But I'm an old, onery SOB.


I had a good surgeon, but an even better physical therapist.

Please, ask any questions you require.



posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 04:41 PM
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If your knees are bad, and causing you pain, get them replaced! I know the knee replacement is one pain (mainly the physical therapy after the replacement. The only reason I would lean towards doing them both at once would be maybe after getting through the first one, you might not want to repeat that process again...



posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by grayeagle
 
First of all, if you haven't already done so please seek a second professional opinion before making a major surgical decision. If you have already done so and feel that the surgery is indeed necessary whether you have both knees done at the same time or separately really would depend on your current lifestyle.

If you are currently working full time and wish to miss as little work time as possible it may be better to have both knees done at once. It may take you longer to move around freely but you will miss far less work than by having the surgeries separately, especially if you have a desk job or something else that isn't physically taxing. My brother inlaw had his done separately and regretted it because he missed far more work than if he'd have done it all at once and also ended up paying a lot more in co-pays and deductibles.



posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 04:48 PM
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reply to post by littled16
 


A good point, but if mobility early on is an issue, then I'd do one at a time.

Since I had just the one, I couldn't imagine two, however.



posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 04:49 PM
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reply to post by usernameconspiracy
 


Yes, that thought crossed my mind! I don't want one surgery to keep me from doing the second. But women can have second and more babies after going through childbirth how can I be a wimp? I think I am leaning toward separate surgeries because I have heard that it is being able to physically rehab the knee is a big part of replacement success.



posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by grayeagle
 


I really don't have much knowledge on knee replacement...but I do care. I did find an interesting article written by (Jonathan Cluett, M.D.,)

Link:orthopedics.about.com...

Meanwhile I send healing energy and prayers your way.




posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by grayeagle
 


Be aware that since you are having significant knee problems that they also affect the rest of your skeletal system.

I have had 5 knee surgeries (The Docs say I’m too young for a replacement) and over time have also developed both spinal and hip degeneration as a result. It’s all connected. I wish I could get/afford that surgery. I’m sick of the pain.

Research things, but don’t be afraid to do what you need to do. I have a friend who was extremely afraid of surgery. Now he needs a hip replacement, both sides AND both knees. The Docs tell him that if he would have come in when they recommended 10 years ago, he probably wouldn’t be going through this.
edit on 18-4-2013 by TDawgRex because: typo



posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 05:11 PM
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Originally posted by beezzer
reply to post by littled16
 


A good point, but if mobility early on is an issue, then I'd do one at a time.


I agree. Such decisions really should be based on individual needs and circumstances and if being able to get "back on one's feet" as quickly as possible is a factor then doing the surgeries separately would be advisable.



posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by caladonea
 


Thanks caladonea! I can use all the good thoughts and prayers anyone has. I just got off the phone with my son letting him know what is up and I hung up on him! I was trying to communicate everything the doctor said and he kind of interrupted me trying to complete my sentences for me. I felt an immediate escalation of frustration so I hung up! I surprised myself with the amount of anger attached. My accident occurred when I was hit by a driver who was talking on her cell phone and ran a stop sign. I ended up with knee damage and had to have a titanium plate put in my neck.

I am obviously experiencing a lot of emotion around this. Maybe I am still mad at her for the continuing health problems I am suffering because of her actions. To everyone reading, please don't use your phones while driving.



posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 05:21 PM
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reply to post by TDawgRex
 


I can already feel the affects on the rest of my body in trying to compensate. Especially on my left side. My hip on that side is starting to hurt on occasion.



posted on Apr, 18 2013 @ 05:22 PM
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reply to post by littled16
 

Thanks for your responses and comments. I am retired but I live alone so I think it makes a lot of sense to do one at a time.



posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 02:35 AM
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reply to post by grayeagle
 


My Grandmother was about your age when she had the double knee replacement. Took about 6 months to really get going again and about a year to be back to full.

My biggest recommendation is loose as much weight as you can. She did not loose as much as they said and they almost refused. I believe if she would have lost about 30 more pounds she would have recovered much faster.

Please I have seen it, get the weight off and make sure you keep it off. I offer my prayers to you that all goes well.


CX

posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 04:21 AM
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reply to post by grayeagle
 


Hi there,

I can only share what i saw in an old workmate of mine.

A teacher at a school where i used to work had major problems with his knees, used to walk with great pain. Had both replaced at the same time, after a period of rest he was back at school running after the kids as good as the rest of us. I'd say he was about 60.

Good luck with it.


CX.



posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 06:38 AM
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No advice about which option to take, you know what is right for you. I am a retired RN and I have cared for someone who had one done, and someone who had both done, there are arguments for either option.. Knee surgery is vastly improved these days and they get your knee moving immediately with the continuous passive motion (CPM) machine. I'm sure you have read all about it online.

I have faith you will make the right decision. Will keep you in my thoughts and prayers. I know what it is to be in pain daily, and how wonderful it is to have relief, Blessings to you.



posted on Apr, 19 2013 @ 11:01 AM
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Thanks to all of you who have commented. Last fall I made a commitment to myself to lose weight and live healthier. My initial attempts focused on food changes and portion control. I got stuck at 23#s lost and then after adding walking to my lifestyle change I dropped down to 35#s lost but then the knee pain became too intense to walk. That was when I was referred to find out what was going on in my knees. Hence, now I am trying to decide the efficacy of having one at a time and having both done at once.

I think I am leaning toward one at a time because of living alone and because I have heard the ability to rehab quickly is a key to good outcome. Mentally, I think I would rather have them done at the same time just to have it over and done with. I have had 3 orthoscopic surgeries on my knees for torn meniscus. two went well and one not so well.

I think I can hobble around and get ice packs, etc., better on one leg then trying to do it with both legs hurting.
I quess my next question is what type of knee replacement device should I be looking at. I have a friend who had a replacement done only to have to have it removed because he discovered he is allergic to the nickle metal in the device. I know there are some new materials (tantalum) out there but I am reluctant to use them because sometimes those type of things can prove to not be so good.

Also, I know that not every surgeon or area has access to the newer procedures. I am embarking on a journey here that has serious impact on my life. In fact I am thinking perhaps I should take all of you along and make this an ongoing thread to chart my progress. Perhaps it can help others through this process.

I don't know if I need to ask the mods for this or if anyone would really be interested. I know a lot of people my age are facing this issue and I have to admit I am starting out with a big deficit in information and knowledge. What to you think?





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