IMF suggests US add $1.40 a gallon gas tax

page: 3
20
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join

posted on Mar, 30 2013 @ 01:18 PM
link   
reply to post by LABTECH767
 


Big difference with the UK. That's a relatively small area compared to North America. Hell, most of our provinces are larger than the UK AND you have an excellent public transit system. Here distances are much greater to travel and limited by a lack of decent options. That drains the motorist. Then you have the producers. Farmers, any manufacturer really and they have to move goods around. The greater the distance the more it costs. With increased fuel costs it adds to inflation. Now the motorist that is a consumer now is getting screwed in 2 directions.




posted on Mar, 30 2013 @ 01:25 PM
link   
Sad children die every year.

If a simple rise in gas taxes can stop just one sad child from dying, isn't it worth it?

If you are against this idea, then you must want to make children sad and kill them.

Shame on all you child-making-sad-then-killing-them people!


ETA; just an example of how they will try to sell this idiotic idea.
edit on 30-3-2013 by beezzer because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 12:17 AM
link   
reply to post by OptimusSubprime
 


excuse the blank out of me but who the bloody helck said we had to listen to anything the imf has said . this carbon tax bull fodder is getting out of had hello people global warming isn't real its in your politicians headsor is a scheme they cooked up to releive you of your capital.



posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 12:19 AM
link   
I just got a new car that only takes Supreme. Crap. Worth it, but crap.



posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 12:21 AM
link   
reply to post by OptimusSubprime
 

It would still be cheaper than we pay in Australia.



posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 07:37 AM
link   
Here in South Africa we are now paying over 13 ZAR a liter for gas(we call it petrol).13 ZAR converts to 1.41 US$.I honestly can for the life of me not understand how folks here can still afford to drive 4x4's and other gas-guzzlers.It has to be that those folks live on credit-because it's certainly not especially wealthy people i'm referring to-just average people,not dirtpoor,not wealthy.We drive a Toyota Tazz-and the price of gas is a major problem for us,and one of the main reasons we can never really go anywhere,except a trip to the provincial capital once a month.And my province has the Kruger Park,as well as some interesting places,and of magnificent nature scenery,like around the Sabie+Hazyview areas.Its really sad,but we have to try+buy the healthiest food we can,we have kids.Its a case of take the kids somewhere nice every weekend-and live on bread+butter+we're lucky the occasional egg.Or have them eat a variety of healthy food,and basically sit around at home 99,99% of the time.



posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 08:09 AM
link   
reply to post by intrepid
 


We used to have many joke's about Texan's coming over to the UK and being surprised that the county's were smaller than there ranch's, well everything used to be bigger in Texas, as for the public transportation well the rail network is overpriced and for the most part uses much outdated rolling stock, the road public transport system of buses has been scaled back only to profitable area's except were they are subsidised and that has left many people isolated indeed the past government's claimed a sell off of the transport network would provide better service and that was an outright lie. Still I do believe maintaining a cheap internal transport system is essential to a 21st century economy and though you pay a very small amount for you petrol compared to the UK the effect of a increased cost would filter through to the rest of the American economy, the only exception were this does no harm is were the money is then spent to maintain or provide alternative transport system's and that just will not happen, the money will instead filter in to the account's of corporation's and this transfers wealth and money asymmetrically in an economy putting the burden of cost's on the poorest and hardest working people whom are the heart of the economy.



posted on Mar, 31 2013 @ 09:03 AM
link   
US guys,

I pay in The Netherlands in dollars around 8.28 dollar per US gallon for Gasoline EUR 95.
I converted all values already.

I have the luck to drive 2 miles and reach germany where the price is around 7.52 dollar per US gallon.
Diesel is little bit cheaper per liter then gasoline in our country but its taxed more with a different tax.



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 03:32 AM
link   

Originally posted by intrepid
reply to post by LABTECH767
 


Big difference with the UK. That's a relatively small area compared to North America. Hell, most of our provinces are larger than the UK AND you have an excellent public transit system. Here distances are much greater to travel and limited by a lack of decent options. That drains the motorist. Then you have the producers. Farmers, any manufacturer really and they have to move goods around. The greater the distance the more it costs. With increased fuel costs it adds to inflation. Now the motorist that is a consumer now is getting screwed in 2 directions.



Good point. The average motorist in the UK does 15000 miles a year. How does that compare to the USA? I do around 30,000/year in my van and 5-6000/year in my cars. Luckily my van fuel is paid for by my employer, who's fuel spend is over £1,000,000/month!



posted on Apr, 1 2013 @ 06:32 PM
link   
discourage us from driving? i live in a city that has very poor public transportation. (minneapolis)
a sudden boom of need for it would be disasterous for at least a year before they add some busses.
we dont have lightrails -.-





new topics
top topics
 
20
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join