Just Add Water: How Scientists Are Using Silicon to Produce Hydrogen On Demand

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posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 01:01 AM
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Well well. Interesting develpments indeed.

Hydrogen Production



The reaction didn't require any light, heat or electricity, and also created hydrogen about 150 times faster than similar reactions using silicon particles 100 nanometers wide, and 1,000 times faster than bulk silicon, according to the study.


I´d say this would be a HOAX since we cant have
developments that goes against "other" ppl´s
beliefs.




"It was previously unknown that we could generate hydrogen this rapidly from silicon, one of Earth's most abundant elements," Erogbogbo said. "Safe storage of hydrogen has been a difficult problem even though hydrogen is an excellent candidate for alternative energy, and one of the practical applications of our work would be supplying hydrogen for fuel cell power. It could be military vehicles or other portable applications that are near water."


Ofcorse it was UNKNOWN. Damn does everyone think they
have the manuscript to read. "Safe storage is a problem"
YES, we know its a problem. Cause WE know that we DONT
know everyting.

FFS. These are the kinds of news the world needs, and yet
ppl tend to say "Naa cant be done, or, Naa works against
the laws of physics, or, yada yada yada...."
edit on 2013/1/23 by Miccey because: LOL Forgot the link




posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 01:07 AM
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O.o

Not sure whether to take seriously.

But maybe for portable power situations that don't need it to be cheap.

Maybe. Erp. I don't know.

So is this a war between hydyrogen fuel-cell cars and battery electrics? Well, if hydrogen is cost effective and the cars go further than EV's, it might work out. If it's green enough. According to the past few links I read, they're trying to find a non-polluting way of making it.
edit on 23-1-2013 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 01:38 AM
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Aaaand, here we do have the problem:


Though it takes significant energy and resources to produce the super-small silicon balls


Therefore, and because the silicon (I had to look at the source to verify that they weren't doing that error many newspapers are doing, to confuse silicon and silicone) doesn't just work as a catalytic converter but dissipates with the reaction, the use is confined to special options.

Nice finding, anyway!



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 02:14 AM
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reply to post by ManFromEurope
 


My POINT was:

We do NOT have all the answers, there is NO MANUSCRIPT
and development is progressing. And if not now then maybe
tomorrow or in a year, there WILL be a technology that IS
a gamechanger, globaly..



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 03:12 AM
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Originally posted by Miccey
reply to post by ManFromEurope
 


My POINT was:

We do NOT have all the answers, there is NO MANUSCRIPT
and development is progressing. And if not now then maybe
tomorrow or in a year, there WILL be a technology that IS
a gamechanger, globaly..


Anything is POSSIBLE, but not everything possible is FEASIBLE. And the idea with these silicon balls is confined to a small area of usage. Right now, the method to produce those balls is way too energy-consuming to produce any commercial interest.
We could really, really use something that produces hydrogen in an efficient way.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 04:32 AM
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Originally posted by Miccey
I´d say this would be a HOAX since we cant have
developments that goes against "other" ppl´s
beliefs...


FFS. These are the kinds of news the world needs, and yet
ppl tend to say "Naa cant be done, or, Naa works against
the laws of physics, or, yada yada yada...."


Of course, before going on a tirade against those nasty engineers and physicists, you *might* try actually reading the article for content.

The article's telling you that when you add the silicon nanoparticles to water, they are destroyed, converted to silicic acid and hydrogen. The nanoparticles will create a certain volume of hydrogen from the water, and that's it.

In order to regenerate the silicon to nanoparticles again, you have to put more energy into it than you got from the hydrogen. And that's why the article is calling it an energy storage method instead of "miraculous free energy". It's more like a metal hydrate.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:38 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 

There're some articles on there that say we could make hydrogen in our nuclear power plants. But I think the catch is that we will need a market for it. Like hydrogen fuel-cell cars. This would reduce our CO2 emissions. And if the cars have a larger range than EV's, it might be comepetitive.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 01:39 PM
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reply to post by jonnywhite
 


Sure, direct dissociation by radiation is a method. I'm not sure how efficient it is, but it definitely works. Of course, the media's invested a lot of effort into making nuclear power plants super-scary, so Joe Sixpack would likely be afraid of reactor-produced hydrogen.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 02:05 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


yea joe six pack SHOULD BE WORRIED about spent fuel rods that are stock piled and the super smart scientists cant figure out what to do with them. Never mind, the earthquakes will fix that like in japan.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 02:52 PM
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FINAL TIME:

I did NOT say that this is the SOLOUTION.

Get it?!?!?
Naa. Why get my hopes up.

All you guys wanna do is debate whats possible
and whats not.

My statement is and will be:
WE DO NOT KNOW EVERYTHING.
YEEEEZ...

Well, im out...



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 03:00 PM
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Originally posted by Miccey
FINAL TIME:

I did NOT say that this is the SOLOUTION.

Get it?!?!?
Naa. Why get my hopes up.

All you guys wanna do is debate whats possible
and whats not.

My statement is and will be:
WE DO NOT KNOW EVERYTHING.
YEEEEZ...

Well, im out...


Then rename your thread to WE DON'T KNOW EVERYTHING......List this as an example and be done with it.....

This is a thread about energy from hydrogen unfortunately and that is the kind of response you will get from it......Geesh think about what you are saying above.....You are yelling at people to NOT talk about what your thread is about....

My oh my take a zanex and sit back and discuss YOUR thread.....



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 04:53 PM
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Congratulations!



This topic and thread has been chosen to be discussed by the ATS LIVE crew this Saturday night between 6-9pm pst (9-12 est), as part of this weeks exciting "Turbo Topics" segment.



We are running 256kbps through the ATS Player but we now run a 32kbps stream for those of you with slower connections and there are also options to listen via other players on our relay site at Illustrial Website. You can also connect to the low bandwidth stream by clicking here to listen to the ATSLive Radio Show on ShoutCast
 


For more information and past shows, be sure to check out the ATSLive Show Threads Here.

Hope you'll listen in to the show!
Johnny



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by Miccey
 


Sounds very similar to 'Brown's gas' and his process to elicit HHO from water.

He used small, spherical ball like material as a catalyst too...he kept that part secret, but claimed it was abundant, cheap and easy to make.

ETA;

His small balls (ahem) were nowhere near nano sized, and they produced plenty of froth.

Sorry, but it's true.

edit on 23-1-2013 by MysterX because: added comment



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 01:10 AM
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reply to post by MysterX
 

Yea, i wouldnt be surprised.
It astounds me how 99%
can be though.



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 01:11 AM
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reply to post by JohnnyAnonymous
 


AGAIN?!?
Thats the second thread in what, barly 2 weeks..



posted on Jan, 31 2013 @ 12:56 AM
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Guess what......

MORE DEVELPMENT:

Fuel of the Future: Cheap Hydrogen from Water One Step Closer

We DEFINATLY do not know everything. And ONE day, ONE!! day...




The team, led by Prince­ton chem­istry pro­fes­sor Annabella Sel­l­oni, takes inspi­ra­tion from bac­te­ria that make hydro­gen from water using enzymes called di-iron hydro­ge­nases. Selloni's team uses com­puter mod­els to fig­ure out how to incor­po­rate the magic of these enzymes into the design of prac­ti­cal syn­thetic cat­a­lysts that humans can use to pro­duce hydro­gen from water.


Bacteria hu, well thers LOTS and LOTS of that..And is EASILY produced..




Sel­l­oni and her team con­ducted their research in sil­ico -- that is, using com­puter mod­el­ing. The goal is to learn enough about how these cat­a­lysts work to some­day cre­ate work­ing cat­a­lysts that can make vast quan­ti­ties of inex­pen­sive hydro­gen for use in vehi­cles and elec­tric­ity production.


BOTH cars and electric production..."Free Energy" someone...And NO i do NOT mean free energy
as something from nothing...
Thats just a lame definition that dont hold any grounds anymore...






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