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Because in America if you want to know what the Government is doing, all you got to do is ask....

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posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 07:14 PM
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Some of you may remember a story that came out in 2010 about a 20 year old California citizen who found a device attached to his car and posted photos of it online. 48 hours later the FBI came for their GPS Tracking device.


And that was how we found out that the Government thinks they can track any of us at any time. But what are the possible reasons for them to do such a thing? Only they know the answer to this question.

Last year the FBI publicly announced the existence of two memos that outline the guidelines for applying these devices to track individuals location. So the ACLU filed a FOIA request for the release of the memos.

And this is what they got!

Guidance Regarding the Application of United States. v. Jones, 132 S. Ct. 945 (2012), to GPS Tracking Devices

and

Guidance Regarding the Application of United States v. Jones, 132 S. Ct.945 (2012), to Additional Investigative Techniques

And that's why we must show the rest of the world how in a free society the people have the right to petition the government.

Because in America if you want to know what the Government is doing, all you got to do is ask....



This is what it's like to live in a country where you are FREE to do what they tell you.


Justice Department Refuses to Release GPS Tracking Memos


Two key memos outlining the Justice Department’s views about when Americans can be surreptitiously tracked with GPS technology are being kept secret by the department despite a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit filed by the ACLU to force their release. The FBI’s general counsel discussed the existence of the two memos publicly last year, yet the Justice Department is refusing to release them without huge redactions.




posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 12:35 PM
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Another secret law, another day at the Obama DOJ


While we wait for courts to weigh in, how much privacy do Americans have in their movements? Exactly as much as law enforcement agents believe they must give us.



No one has anything to say about this? Really?



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 01:23 PM
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People volunteer their information via facebook, cell phones and computers. The gov't knows where everyone is at, what time they go to sleep, what time they go to work. They know more about us, then we know about ourselves.



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 01:39 PM
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reply to post by whatsecret
 


Releasing information about the motives behind investigation techniques such as those could easily be harmful for there investigation if the suspects they are tracking suddenly started looking for these devices because they fell under certain criteria. I know nothing about that man. He could just as easily be a former heavy drug trafficker or his car belonged to one at some point so the Feds may have been tracking drug movements. Of course that is merely speculation.



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 04:08 PM
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Originally posted by GrimReaper86
reply to post by whatsecret
 


Releasing information about the motives behind investigation techniques such as those could easily be harmful for there investigation if the suspects they are tracking suddenly started looking for these devices because they fell under certain criteria. I know nothing about that man. He could just as easily be a former heavy drug trafficker or his car belonged to one at some point so the Feds may have been tracking drug movements. Of course that is merely speculation.


I guess I'm just one of those old school people, you know the type that think in America people are protected by the Bill of Rights and silly stuff like that.

It would be nice to know that they need to have some kind of probable cause and a court warrant to stick one of those things under your bumper. But that's crazy talk these days. Now it's the people that need to prove that Law Enforcement DON'T have probable cause for searches and seizures of property and privacy.

This kid by the way was guilty of one thing only, he is the son of a deceased Islamic-American community leader.



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by whatsecret
 


A large amount of people have already spoken about this. 65,899,660 to be exact.


That is the amount of people who are perfectly ok with this type of actions by their Justice Department, their Attorney General, and their President.

Elections have consequences and right now there are more of them (people who don't care) than us (people who care).



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 04:23 PM
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The guy should have got a reward for finding that tracking device. Finders keepers, losers weepers is the old saying. So when is the FBI going to shut down the net?



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 04:23 PM
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Originally posted by Carreau
reply to post by whatsecret
 


A large amount of people have already spoken about this. 65,899,660 to be exact.


That is the amount of people who are perfectly ok with this type of actions by their Justice Department, their Attorney General, and their President.

Elections have consequences and right now there are more of them (people who don't care) than us (people who care).


Well if all those people say it's okay... How sad.



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 04:25 PM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
The guy should have got a reward for finding that tracking device. Finders keepers, losers weepers is the old saying. So when is the FBI going to shut down the net?


It's classified. But they are working on it.



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 04:33 PM
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the guy won and the fbi lost...and it was from 2010



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 04:36 PM
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Originally posted by jimmyx
the guy won and the fbi lost...and it was from 2010


In what way did the FBI lost?





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