'Going for a seven-year walk'...following early humans

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posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 09:37 PM
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Originally posted by votan
reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 



So what does bringing attention to himself accomplish in the world of anthropology?


Nada lol




posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 09:48 PM
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Originally posted by votan
reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 
So what does bringing attention to himself accomplish in the world of anthropology?
Many multiples of this very conversation.



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 05:53 AM
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Well I wish him good luck, I know I could never do it!



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 05:59 AM
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reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 


I think it is a great idea but, to be honest, i am not entirely sure what he will accomplish. It won't be recreating anything - the flora and fauna are different these days, sea levels are different, habitats wildly changed, etc. So, in terms of usefulness, i fail to see the point.


ETA:

Sorry JohnnyCanuck, that reads a bit negative when i look at it now! Wasn't intentional........
edit on 15-1-2013 by Flavian because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 08:19 AM
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Originally posted by Flavian
reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 
I think it is a great idea but, to be honest, i am not entirely sure what he will accomplish. It won't be recreating anything - the flora and fauna are different these days, sea levels are different, habitats wildly changed, etc. So, in terms of usefulness, i fail to see the point.
As someone who dabbles in archaeology, I can go out to survey and test a site. I can retrieve samples and have them radiocarbon dated. I can throw science at human history. On the other hand, I can pick up a 5000 year old stone tool and try to envision the individual who made and used it...how it came to rest where I found it, and consider the connection made as it rests in my hand.

A couple of years back, I was at L'Anse aux Meadows. In a historical context, it is the first known European settlement in North America. What also gave me pause, though, was that the site represented a coming together of the human race after branching out of Africa.

Sometimes you have to look at the bigger picture to capture the human adventure. To me, it speaks well for our species that not only do we explore the heavens, but that there are those who will take a seven-year stroll to add perspective to our past achievements by illuminating our present condition along those same pathways.



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 10:36 AM
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Good luck to you sir
Stand Tall



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 10:39 AM
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reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 


Thank you for putting into context like that. It makes it much easier to see the point of it! I quite fancy a day or two marching in full Roman Kit with a full backpack to get an idea of marching 25 miles a day (or more). I am fairly sure i wouldn't be in any state to fight at the end of it!

Still though, it would be great if there was someway this could be done following similar routes and experiencing similar fauna and flora (total pie in the sky thinking but still would be great).



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 03:27 PM
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I think it's obvious he's ignoring South Africa for safety reasons. Walking across the African continent is very dangerous, not just because of predators and wildlife, but also because of corrupt governments and some tribes that would probably kill him on the spot if they saw him. Pretty cool idea, the only person that comes to mind that can compare is Grandfather Stalking Wolf (originally from the Apache tribe). He traveled from northern Canda to Southern Chile all on foot on the quest to learn about other cultures and their beliefs on spirituality.
edit on 15-1-2013 by Barcs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 04:15 PM
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reply to post by Barcs
 

If he is ignoring South Africa for "safety reasons" then that is quite sad.

There are routes he could easily follow through Mozambique, Kenya and Tanzania.

Lots of people have actually done that.

There's been no real war in any of these regions since the Cold War ended around 1990, and the people are very friendly.

Apart from some areas of South Africa and city slums, the crime-rate is actually very low in southern Africa.
Attacks by lions are unlikely outside game reserves.

Malaria might be a bigger problem, but that is also so in areas of South America.

Actually Ethiopia is closest to current conflicts in Africa, such as those in Somalia, Sudan and Egypt.

This couple walked 14 000 kilometers from the Cape through 11 African countries recently.
The tribes and animals are often something they wanted to see, and its not necessarily representative of the region.



edit on 15-1-2013 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 08:29 PM
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reply to post by halfoldman
 


A few years ago an Australian kid (19-20 yrs old) walked completely around the coast of Africa with only his surfboard and a daypack. All he didn't cover was the med coast.





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