More troubles for the C-27

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posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 03:16 PM
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Alenia North America has run into more trouble with the US and the C-27. Finmeccanica has been trying to boost US sales of the C-27 and the new Marine One, but in the latest disappointment, the USAF has decided not to renew a contract for to support and induct C-27As into the Afghan Air Force.

After the halt of C-27Js for the US, and now this, there is very little left for Alenia North America with regards to US work after March.

In 2008, the USAF paid $314M for 20 G.222s (C-27A in the USAF). Since then, 16 have been delivered with 4 still in Italy. The 16 delivered have struggled with serviceability issues, and have been grounded twice since delivery. Company officials have said that 10-12 aircraft are available, which is more than the 6 required by the Air Force, and that they never received feedback to responses sent in after receiving notices of contract deficiencies. They said that they have spent $20M of their own money, and another $60M would ensure the types continuation.

This is another contract issue that makes the Air Force look more like the Air Farce when it comes to contracts, and bidding. Finmeccanica will have almost no recourse into getting any money back, as there is no major US partner in this contract. It would be so nice to see a contract bid by the USAF actually either go right, or not turn into a major farce for a change.


U.S. Air Force officials have decided not to renew a contract with Alenia North America to support and induct the small, Italian-made C-27A transport aircraft into the Afghan Air Force.

The decision, provided by the Air Force via letter Dec. 18, is the latest in a string of disappointments for Italian Aerospace conglomerate Finmeccanica as it has sought to boost its U.S. business.

Last February, the Air Force abruptly halted purchases of Alenia’s C-27J Spartan for use by U.S. forces, In addition, Finmeccanica’s AgustaWestland rotorcraft in 2009 lost the joint program with Lockheed Martin to build the next-generation Marine One presidential helicopter.

The Afghan transport decision leaves Alenia little stateside work beyond March.

Source




posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 03:37 PM
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It has been in the works for a little over a year now for the Air Force to give the contract to the Coast Guard. We were expected to get word of the deal last year, but they put it on the back-burner for another year. (Possibly because of elections?).

Anyway, that was the rumor mill as of last summer. I'm hoping we get them.


Acquisition of C-27 (Mar/Apr 2012)
edit on 6-1-2013 by iamhobo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by iamhobo
 


That would be a huge windfall for the CG. This is just another example of the BS coming from the AF leadership lately. They flat out lied about the Block 30 Global Hawk, they probably lied about this too, because they didn't like it, and it would probably mean fewer F-35s and shiny toys.



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 07:02 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I don't understand why we only bought 20 C-27's in the first place, especially if they were supposed to replace the C-23. It seems like they should have bought at least 100-150, not 20.



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 08:12 PM
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Not to mention the type has a long and successful history of commercial operation - trust the AF to screw up something fairly simple!



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 08:27 PM
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reply to post by Antonio1
 


Because the original buy was only going to be for SOF use. So they only needed 20 of them to begin with. If they had worked as well as hoped, or better, then there was the possibility of a bigger buy. But they weren't F-22s or F-35s, so they had to kill them.



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 09:08 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I'm an analyst for the C-27j in the Maryland Air National Guard. On friday, we had a commander's call where he told us that we should all start looking for another job, because by October our unit will be shut down.



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 09:36 PM
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reply to post by iwan2ski
 


They're stupid to get rid of them. It's a nice little plane, and very versatile, but since it's not shiny and fast, and sexy, they don't want them anymore.



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Well as you may already know, the Air Force never wanted them. The Army wanted to them, but the Air Force didn't want the Army to take away fixed wing heavy flying missions from them. So in the end, the Air Force got what they wanted and now they want to get rid of them. Eventhough, they are quite capable cargo aircraft, I still rather have the C-130J's back! Dealing with the Italian Alenia and L3 contractors has been nothing but headaches! Well, either way, I'll be putting out my resumes for hopes of another job.
edit on 7-1-2013 by iwan2ski because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 02:12 PM
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reply to post by iwan2ski
 


I know the Air Force is desperate to keep the Army from flying fixed wing aircraft. That's why they won't give up the A-10 to them. I've also heard that about Alenia, and I know L-3 is a pain to deal with. We had to deal with them at the airport, and it was a joke.

The C-130J is a good airframe, but for a light transport the C-27 is an amazing platform.



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I know the Air Force is desperate to keep the Army from flying fixed wing aircraft.
\
Doesn't the Army have the Harrier and Osprey? I don't know that much about it.

Unless its old rivalry between branches.

Still?



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


That's the Marines. The Army flew the C-7 Caribou for awhile, but that was their last fixed wing aircraft.





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