Fleets Don't Fail Me Now-a Theory

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posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 04:21 PM
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My second thread:

My first thread was me all excited because I saw UFOs from my yard. I'm not good at attaching one thread to another I usually don't manage to finish making a thread, because there are too many buttons and talking with my hands involves paying attention to the dam** spell checker (rant over).


When I saw my "ufo's" I had a thought. The fleet movement reminded me of the ISS tether that broke:

The tether incident

These critters always reminded me of jellyfish. Soooooo...I started looking around. Guess what?

NASA has this really cute page which is for educational purposes. It talks about a Life Science experiment they did on STS40 mission. They took 2400 some odd jellyfish into space to test what effects microenviroments have on different life forms (I think they had insects as well as invertebrates.

The experiment involved releasing the critters and seeing how their bodies managed in space. Polyps are the little eggs, and nursery stage of this jellyfish (called a Moon jellyfish, interestingly).

An abstract from one of the scientists leading the team:



Abstract Graviceptor (rhopalium) development in Aurelia aurita ephyrae which developed on Earth and in space during the nine-day NASA SLS-1 mission was compared. The space-developed ephyrae made graviceptors which were morphologically similar to those of their ground-based controls. Rhopalia of both groups developed statocysts with statoliths, ocelli, ciliated mechanoreceptor cells, and immature touch-plates with one type of hair cell. The number of rhopalia formed per arm of ephyrae of both groups revealed no significant differences. The number of statoliths formed per rhopalium was statistically higher in ephyrae which were induced to form in space with iodine than in L(Launch)+8h controls. Statolith numbers were not significantly different between Earth-formed control ephyrae and those formed from polyps induced on Earth and then sent into space 24h and 48h later. Statolith loss from rhopalia was significantly enhanced in the space-maintained ephyrae in ASW as compared to their controls. Ephyrae formed through thyroxine treatment and those mMoon Jellyfishaintained in thyroxine in space had statolith numbers comparable to thyroxine-treated controls. Pulsing abnormalities seen in some space-developed ephyrae suggest that some space-formed ephyrae may have developed abnormal rhopalia because normal rhopalia development and function is necessary for normal pulsing.



Here is a dumbed down version:

www.youtube.com...

Okay-- here goes:

The upper atmospheric layers are basically the same components of water, with a different bouncy (sp).' Jellyfish have no limit in growth other than the size of their environment.

NASA released the jellyfish in 1991. Fleets have been seen with increasing frequency globally.

I have always thot they were jellyfish.

Why not?




posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 06:07 PM
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poor little buggers!
Not sure if I understood it correctly....did they realise them into actual space? or just tested the effects of gravity whilst in the ship?

So......no alien lifeforms then just flying mutated killer jellyfish?



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 06:22 PM
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Originally posted by phyllida
poor little buggers!
Not sure if I understood it correctly....did they realise them into actual space? or just tested the effects of gravity whilst in the ship?

So......no alien lifeforms then just flying mutated killer jellyfish?


They were observed inside a lab module contained within the ISS.
No jellyfish were released into space.





 
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