Reliable 2nd Vehicle

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posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 08:04 PM
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Hello, and Happy Thanksgiving, fellow ATSers.

The missus and I have have owned an '09 Civic Sedan from new, and while it has been bullet-proof (135k miles with zero problems), it is just now starting to show some age, and, thus, we're looking for a second car/truck/small suv to backstop the Civic should it go down for one reason or other. It need not be sexy, it need not be fast, it just needs to be somewhat reliable. Any suggestions?

(Somewhat) arbitrary parameters; under $5000, newer than 1995, manual tranny, would prefer a timing chain instead of a belt, with special emphasis on Japanese and North American marques. Mileage...under 125-150k. I've had some good experiences over the years (Honda, any GM with a 350, Toyota), and some not-so-good ones (Saturn, Volvo), and do have some knowledge of what to look for, but would like to hear the opinions and experiences of others. One can always learn something from town hall, no?

Much obliged




posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 08:18 PM
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Ya cant go wrong with one of these


Pic source

But watch out for these guys
edit on 22-11-2012 by VoidHawk because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 08:22 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


True.

Might be something of a challenge on I-70 going over the Rockies, though.



posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 08:29 PM
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I am going to let everyone in on one of my little secrets.

Check out a US military Mechanized Museum if you get the chance, or you are within a reasonable distance. All those vehicles are kept in tip top condition because they are used in parades. Check out all diesel engines from the 40s and 50s, those things will run forever through anything.

That's what I am going to do.



posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 08:31 PM
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Pushrods and timing chains?

I doubt you will find any Japanese cars that use a timing chain still. Maybe Mitsubishi still utilise them, but I wouldn't wish a Mitsubishi on my worst enemy.

The 350's now come both ways, belt for power or chain for longevity, but the big crunch will be fuel consumption when comparing with a four-banger.

Personally, if you like luxury, a late 90's 450SE Mercedes will be within the budget. These are surprisingly reliable though prices for parts are higher than average. AVOID Asian imports! Asian mercs are made as cheaply as possible and are nothing like Australian/German/American models.

Reliability, I would go for diesel or a small-block in your body of choice. Your the best judge here as you obviously know what body type, bests suits you.

Cheapest alternative .......Hyundai Excel



posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 08:37 PM
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reply to post by OccamAssassin
 


Actually, our Honda utilizes a timing chain (1.8 V-TEC I-4). Strangely, though, the six-cylinder Accords utilize a belt. (Shrugs.) Not sure how that came to be.

I'd take a Hyundai over a Mitsubishi any day of the week.



posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 08:54 PM
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Originally posted by lokomotiv23
reply to post by OccamAssassin
 


Actually, our Honda utilizes a timing chain (1.8 V-TEC I-4). Strangely, though, the six-cylinder Accords utilize a belt. (Shrugs.) Not sure how that came to be.

I'd take a Hyundai over a Mitsubishi any day of the week.


Your spot on. It seems that 4-cylinder car manufacturers have made a move back to timing chains.

Personally, I like belts for power and fuel economy, but that is just me.

Apparently, the car manufacturers moved back to chains because customers were not following the service manual. When the belts broke, the customers were less likely to buy the same brand of car so the manufacturers decided to go back to the chains.



posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 09:05 PM
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Originally posted by OccamAssassin

Originally posted by lokomotiv23
reply to post by OccamAssassin
 


Actually, our Honda utilizes a timing chain (1.8 V-TEC I-4). Strangely, though, the six-cylinder Accords utilize a belt. (Shrugs.) Not sure how that came to be.

I'd take a Hyundai over a Mitsubishi any day of the week.


Your spot on. It seems that 4-cylinder car manufacturers have made a move back to timing chains.

Personally, I like belts for power and fuel economy, but that is just me.

Apparently, the car manufacturers moved back to chains because customers were not following the service manual. When the belts broke, the customers were less likely to buy the same brand of car so the manufacturers decided to go back to the chains.



Methinks you are correct; I know most Americans are not fond of automotive maintenance, hence, the chain (especially now that most motors are interference). If I were buying a new car, I'd look for a belt. A chain in a used car provides just a bit more peace of mind.

Then there are the intervals at which the belts have to be replaced, some are 60k, some are 100k. It can add up if you live in a remote location like we do.
edit on 22-11-2012 by lokomotiv23 because: Error in posting.



posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 09:49 PM
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Originally posted by OccamAssassin

Originally posted by lokomotiv23
reply to post by OccamAssassin
 


Actually, our Honda utilizes a timing chain (1.8 V-TEC I-4). Strangely, though, the six-cylinder Accords utilize a belt. (Shrugs.) Not sure how that came to be.

I'd take a Hyundai over a Mitsubishi any day of the week.


Your spot on. It seems that 4-cylinder car manufacturers have made a move back to timing chains.

Personally, I like belts for power and fuel economy, but that is just me.

Apparently, the car manufacturers moved back to chains because customers were not following the service manual. When the belts broke, the customers were less likely to buy the same brand of car so the manufacturers decided to go back to the chains.



Yeah, Timing chain was the #1 thing I was looking for when I bought my 07 Corolla S.

Even though my 94 Dakota is on its 3rd one after only 150000 miles.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 07:37 PM
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Hyundai Getzs are cheap tough and fun.
You could do a lot worse .



posted on Nov, 29 2012 @ 10:24 PM
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Early 2000's 3 series sedan with manual transmission. ~5-7k and bulletproof with amazing gas mileage and power



posted on Nov, 30 2012 @ 10:35 PM
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Originally posted by lokomotiv23
Hello, and Happy Thanksgiving, fellow ATSers.

The missus and I have have owned an '09 Civic Sedan from new, and while it has been bullet-proof (135k miles with zero problems), it is just now starting to show some age, and, thus, we're looking for a second car/truck/small suv to backstop the Civic should it go down for one reason or other. It need not be sexy, it need not be fast, it just needs to be somewhat reliable. Any suggestions?

(Somewhat) arbitrary parameters; under $5000, newer than 1995, manual tranny, would prefer a timing chain instead of a belt, with special emphasis on Japanese and North American marques. Mileage...under 125-150k. I've had some good experiences over the years (Honda, any GM with a 350, Toyota), and some not-so-good ones (Saturn, Volvo), and do have some knowledge of what to look for, but would like to hear the opinions and experiences of others. One can always learn something from town hall, no?

Much obliged



Well the first car that comes to mind that fits your criteria would be the day to day runabout I own myself ~ Toyota Avensis !!

Now it's not sold in the US as far as I'm aware but there will be similar models.I'm sure you have the Corolla over there and there must be a larger family model which is what the Avensis is over here.

The main point being though is absolutely bulletproof reliability.The 1.8 7A-FE or the 1.8 vvti 1ZZ-FE that replaced it are twin cam 16 valve engines both use timing chains.Timing chains are still quite popular with Japanese manufacturers though personally I prefer a belt !!



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 04:50 PM
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From my experience, last generation GM N-body cars seem pretty good. (1999 to 2005 Olds Alero or Pontiac Grand Am) Not sure about the 2.4L, but the 3.4L V6 (LA1), is pretty decent. (An aluminum block version of the light truck engine. Not rev-happy, but big fat torque curve means its no slouch.) Only things I've known it to have issues with is the lower intake manifold gasket and EGR valve, but if they're fixed right they tend to stay fixed. If I recall, only belt is serpentine, no chain for timing since its a pushrod engine with gear driven cam. Not sure how hard the stick-shift requirement is, but you're not going to have much luck finding the cars in a manual version. Fuel economy is good for a V6 of that age, it's almost comparable to an average 4-cyl from the early 1990's.

Only really yucky thing is interior plastic can get bad quick. (Unfortunately GM cheaped out on those materials. Shame since the ergonomic layout is really good - basic but straight-forward functional.) If you get one where the inside's not shot, definitely invest in a sun shade. Also factory stereos have a few rough spots. Yet that and the interior has little to do with the actual reliability of the car itself, just some things to be aware of.





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