Solar Energy Going Mainstream

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posted on Nov, 13 2012 @ 04:04 PM
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Recently I did a thread about, Solar, y u no popular?

And the information in it still stands. However, there is a change sweeping over the solar energy as of late due to the production of extremely cheap panels out of China.

This is good and bad really, because PV cell manufacturers cannot compete because of it, and decreased revenue has put a number of them out of business. On the other hand, solar energy distributors and customers both have an increased opportunity for cheaper production and usage. Which, may send solar into a far more popular method of energy production.


Solar: Close to Going Mainstream

A slew of new solar powered electricity projects have come online in the past two years, and the sheer volume has solar power nearing price-parity with carbon-based generation in some markets.

...

A combination of government subsidies and growing production of solar photovoltaic (PV) panels has lowered prices, even as Europe’s economic woes serve as a brake on demand. Since 2008, the price of PV panels has fallen by 75 percent. PV modules now sell for about $2.30 per watt, down from $3.51 per watt only a year ago. These low prices are driving solar energy into the mainstream. A recent European Photovoltaic Industry Association report, states that solar is fast “becoming a fully competitive part of the [global] electricity system.”

...

While low-cost solar power is a net-positive for developers and consumers, it has been a tough ride for PV panel makers. Manufacturers have seen their revenues dwindle, forcing many, like the California-based manufacturer Solyndra, into bankruptcy. With inexpensive PV panels from Asia flooding the market, many manufacturers are drowning in excess inventory.


If we do see a rise in solar, it will be interesting to see the mega companies that may emerge in the market. Soon people may be lashing out at "big solar"



Solar




posted on Nov, 13 2012 @ 04:13 PM
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it only makes sense, the sun outputs daily much more than we even need globally.
the hard part is taxing the sun's energy itself. and yes it's hard to harness it effectively but that should be on our list of priorities instead of relying on fossil fuels.

this should speak for itself

Energy 362,692,553 Energy used today (MWh), of which: info 293,779,371 - from non-renewable sources (MWh) info 68,913,182 - from renewable sources (MWh) info 2,707,965,532,026 Solar energy striking Earth today (MWh) info 77,617,165 Oil pumped today (barrels) info 1,259,581,021,552 Oil left (barrels) info 14,995 Days to the end of oil info 1,148,003,934,919 Gas left (boe) info 60,421 Days to the end of gas 4,396,151,464,240 Coal left (boe) 151,591 Days to the end of coal

www.worldometers.info...
edit on 13-11-2012 by UziLiberman because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 13 2012 @ 04:13 PM
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Originally posted by boncho
Soon people may be lashing out at "big solar"


Gods, I hope so...

I would love to have the problem of "the evil solar industry".



posted on Nov, 13 2012 @ 04:55 PM
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It's like everything else,if we see a bargain,we snap it up.

I did,just bought some solar panels on the cheap,hang on let me go look,I still have the box.

...................................................................................................................................................... ...................................................................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................................................... OMG,they are made in China!

Does that mean they will not work as good under my one sun,versus chinas two suns,or is my death by solar panel imminent?
edit on 13-11-2012 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 13 2012 @ 05:09 PM
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Here in Australia we've seen the cost of electricity more than double in the past 10 yrs. This has corresponded with growth in the renewable energy sector and seen a proliferation of domestic solar panel installation companies. I installed a 3kW P.V array (grid return) on my house and sell my excess electricity back to the grid for 52c/kWhr.
The current price for peak demand electricity with my supplier is something like 36c/kWhr. However we recently elected a new state government who went on a spending cut frenzy and dropped the buy-back rate to 8c/kWhr for everyone installing solar after June 30. I was lucky I got in before the cut-off!
So I can confirm that where I live solar IS mainstream. Most houses in my suburb have a photo-voltaic array on their roofs. I can tell you, there's nothing better than getting a cheque rather than a power bill!



posted on Nov, 13 2012 @ 05:56 PM
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Great thread ..you are right Boncho solar in Australia is going through the roof literally evrywhere.
In fact thinking of switching over to the solar sales side of things there is big money on offer .



posted on Nov, 13 2012 @ 06:02 PM
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Originally posted by Dr Expired
Great thread ..you are right Boncho solar in Australia is going through the roof literally evrywhere.
In fact thinking of switching over to the solar sales side of things there is big money on offer .


The ironic thing here being that China (Terrible for pollution) may have been the instigator in bringing Solar into the mainstream realm. It makes total sense for people (especially in rural areas) to have PVs installed in some form or the other. This will bring down the wear and tear on the grid, and reduce electricity bills over time.

It's a win/win for the businesses involved and the consumer. The only issue I have is the battery needs for solar set ups (although I'm not entirely familiar with the options out there.)

Battery tech will propel solar even further in the future. Interesting thread here.

"Liquid metal battery"



posted on Nov, 13 2012 @ 08:01 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 


Thanks for link to thread makes interesting reading indeed.
Renewable energy is the way of the future.
But let us hope the parasites dont monopolise it.



posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 03:09 PM
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Originally posted by UziLiberman
it only makes sense, the sun outputs daily much more than we even need globally.
the hard part is taxing the sun's energy itself. and yes it's hard to harness it effectively but that should be on our list of priorities instead of relying on fossil fuels.

this should speak for itself

Energy 362,692,553 Energy used today (MWh), of which: info 293,779,371 - from non-renewable sources (MWh) info 68,913,182 - from renewable sources (MWh) info 2,707,965,532,026 Solar energy striking Earth today (MWh) info 77,617,165 Oil pumped today (barrels) info 1,259,581,021,552 Oil left (barrels) info 14,995 Days to the end of oil info 1,148,003,934,919 Gas left (boe) info 60,421 Days to the end of gas 4,396,151,464,240 Coal left (boe) 151,591 Days to the end of coal

www.worldometers.info...
edit on 13-11-2012 by UziLiberman because: (no reason given)


WOW... so if we dont do something within 500years were totally F'd huh??? That would definitley put us back to hunter gathering, temporarily. I think we will die of famine... and the ecosystem???

I think about futurama and how fry was 1000 yeards old..



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 02:40 AM
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Originally posted by boncho

It's a win/win for the businesses involved and the consumer. The only issue I have is the battery needs for solar set ups (although I'm not entirely familiar with the options out there.)

Battery tech will propel solar even further in the future. Interesting thread here.

"Liquid metal battery"



The solar arrangement most people here in Oz have doesn't use batteries. When power produced by the panels exceeds the requirements of the installation, inverters simply export the excess to the grid. Unfortunately, the panels have the highest output in the middle of the day, when demand on the grid is low. Too many people with solar on one section of the grid can cause big problems with the infastructure as the inverters export by producing their voltage just above mains voltage (I believe around 2V) so grid voltage can be driven to levels considered dangerous by the supply authority.
They also cause problems with the work I do. To eliminate blackouts during maintenance to the H.V. side, we connect a generator to the L.V. side of a particular section of the grid, synchronise to the grid then disconnect from the grid and run that area in "island mode" without customers even knowing. If we do this in an area where total solar output exceeds demand then our generators are forced into reverse power. Since a gen set has limited capacity to absorb true power, our set will shut down to protect it from damage. Most panel arrangements will wait 1 min after an outage before coming back on line. Our set will restart, close the breaker and shut down again shortly after. Thus the cycle continues. Of course the residents are fine with losing power every few minutes without notification. I've never had anyone abuse me......

Battery technology just isn't where it needs to be. That would solve most or all of these problems.



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 06:20 AM
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reply to post by OZtracized
 


Thanks for the information.






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