What's With the Unnecessary Apostrophes??

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posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 11:20 AM
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reply to post by EvilAxis
 


thanks for explaining all that
(I knew I was right all along!!! hehe)

I meant "or" instead of "if" in my post. In Dutch there is only one word for both 'or' and 'if'

I'm flamisch Dutch, from Belgium. Not Netherlands.
My little country has 3 languages: Dutch, French and German so we learned them all in highschool together with English (not that most people here are great at languages)
On my vacations in Europe I learned a little Spanish as well. But the one language I'd like to learn is Russian! lol it sounds great :p
edit on 6/11/2012 by GypsK because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 11:49 AM
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Originally posted by EvilAxis
I'm sure that was just a typo, but confusing "to", "too" and "two" seems increasingly common.


That is a common problem I have always had to deal with. Getting words with the same sound mixed up is always a mistake I am looking for in what I type. I know the difference! When I read it, it stands out and i can fix it, but when I am typing it those flip flops always seem to happen with some regularity. It is just a particular quirk that my brain has. As they say, everyone is different.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 12:53 PM
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Originally posted by Mr Tranny
Getting words with the same sound mixed up is always a mistake I am looking for in what I type.

Same hear... er, here. I'm sure much of this comes down to differing approaches to the relatively new media of rapid typed communication. Maybe the more we use them, the more we're inclined to slip the burdensome shackles of observing grammatical niceties.

The rules are supposed to aid clear communication. Presumably new ones are gradually evolving, better suited to these media. In the meantime, we'll have to live with a mishmash of ignored and misapplied conventions.

It may be absurd to stick to the rules, in such fast moving and ephemeral media. A motive for doing so, obviously, is to convey authority by appearing "educated". When speed reading a thread, I confess to sometimes skipping posts exhibiting certain grammatical bugbears.





 
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