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79% cure rate for OCD using Magnetic impulses/ Proof we respond to magnetic fields for ESP

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posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 05:09 PM
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I just saw Dr Phil show. He had a lot of OCD people on and a doctor (Dr. Jabour) who has great success of 79 % curing OCD using magnetic impulses targeted at the brain. These people lose the OCD and again become normal functioning humans.

drphil.com...

As if that's not important enough to post about:

This tells me yes, the human brain does respond to magnetic fields. This is important because debunkers for years have said there is no proof of these claims for dowsing working or people feeling electricity when they touch megalithic stones like Stonehenge. Science will admit they do not fully understand the relationship between magnetic fields/electromagnetism and electricity or electrical impulses (which the brain is full of). This may help explain why people can do other things that involve a sixth sense.
edit on 19-10-2012 by JohnPhoenix because: sp




posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 06:20 PM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


Interestingly, TMS has been around for quite some time, but its empirical efficacy is hindered by the similar confounds that arise in harnessing & controlling magnetism w/in the physics community...

Please note that I'm no physicist, but that's how it's relayed to me every so often when I think it's about time for TMS technology to be ready to cure presenting disorders that psychopharmacology doesn't, but are disorders which also create strong barriers to psychotherapy.

Along ATS lines, I'm still interested to see if Dr. Michael Persinger comes up with anything new because he's considered to be a relative pioneer in the field of TMS research, which not only makes him thick-skinned about peer critique, but an expert at thinking outside of the box. Oh, & it's always cool when a guy with his pedigree isn't afraid to tout fringe ideas!

Speaking of fringe ideas, keep in mind that we are secondary to the primary responsibility of TV doctors' sponsors & sponsors' friends. In this example, Phil's infomercial guest is a neuroradiologist, not a cognitive neuroscientist or even a psychiatrist. In fact, psychologist Phil probably has a greater understanding of brain function (his show still airs) than Dr. Jabour. Nonetheless, Phil will dumb-down & sell us out to get this guy clients & appease sponsors...

I didn't mean to sound condescending. I was just pointing out something that I'm sure you know, but is easy to overlook when smooth talkers like Phil are trying to 'help' people on nat'l TV. S&F--thanks for the cool thread.

edit on 19-10-2012 by OlafMiacov because: qualifier



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 06:24 PM
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What's the long term results of this?



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by Evil_Santa
 


That's the rub, everything that I've seen & read shows a return to stasis shortly after the TMS has been removed. The guy on Phil uses tried & true psychotherapy & drugs to 'supplement' repeated TMS exposure therapy. His is just a novel placebo effect with all of the institutional trimmings.

Here's a short 2009 pdf appealing the FDA approval due to lack of efficacy associated w/TMS for depression Tx.
edit on 19-10-2012 by OlafMiacov because: pdf



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 06:39 PM
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Originally posted by OlafMiacov
reply to post by Evil_Santa
 


That's the rub, everything that I've seen & read (I'll look for links) shows a return to stasis shortly after the TMS has been removed. The guy on Phil uses tried & true psychotherapy & drugs to 'supplement' repeated TMS exposure therapy. His is just a novel placebo effect with all of the institutional trimmings.


Thanks for the info, and that's disappointing. Looks like i'll keep to neurofeedback.

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...




. Thirty-six drug resistant subjects with OCD were assigned to 9-84 sessions of QEEG-guided NF treatment. Daily sessions lasted 60 minutes where 2 sessions with half-hour applications with a 30 minute rest given between sessions were conducted per day. Thirty-three out of 36 subjects who received NF training showed clinical improvement according to the Yale-Brown obsessive-compulsive scale (Y-BOCS). The Minnesota multiphasic inventory (MMPI) was administered before and after treatment to 17 of the subjects. The MMPI results showed significant improvements not only in OCD measures, but all of the MMPI scores showed a general decrease. Finally, according to the physicians' evaluation of the subjects using the clinical global impression scale (CGI), 33 of the 36 subjects were rated as improved. Thirty-six of the subjects were followed for an average of 26 months after completing the study. According to follow-up interviews conducted with them and/or their family members 19 of the subjects maintained the improvements in their OCD symptoms.



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 06:47 PM
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reply to post by Evil_Santa
 


You bet--right now, neurofeedback is the only really tried & true controlled & lasting solution for difficult disorders. It's just not a cash cow!



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 08:11 PM
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I dunno guys.. this one guy on Dr Phil, his parents had tried everything. he has a unique form of OCD even neurofeedback didn't work. As far as the cure goes.. they did not talk like it's a temporary solution but a permanent fix. they showed brain scans of before and after, showing how the part of the brain responsible for the OCD returned to a normal healthy state.
edit on 19-10-2012 by JohnPhoenix because: sp



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 08:28 PM
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Originally posted by JohnPhoenix
I dunno guys.. this one guy on Dr Phil, his parents had tried everything. he has a unique form of OCD even neurofeedback didn't work. As far as the cure goes.. they did not talk like it's a temporary solution but a permanent fix. they showed brain scans of before and after, showing how the part of the brain responsible for the OCD returned to a normal healthy state.
edit on 19-10-2012 by JohnPhoenix because: sp

I also watched the episode. It scared me, the difference between the normal brain & the OCD brain. My 8 yr. old was diagnosed when he was around 3 with OCD. He has gotten better over the years. Right now it's only mild. The only thing that really drives me nuts is his food habits and he is a clock watcher....he has turned out to be a math genius though. Not sure how I feel about the permanent fix. I need to research that more. I have the feeling there was more wrong with the 25 yr. old then just OCD??



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


I didn't see anything about neurofeedback mentioned in any of the videos in the OPs link



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 08:47 PM
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Originally posted by Evil_Santa
reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


I didn't see anything about neurofeedback mentioned in any of the videos in the OPs link


True.. I don't know how much those clips showed. In the show the parents were at their wits end and stated they had tried everything that traditional science said was supposed to help and they even tried silly fringe things because none of the other things worked. I am sure if as you indicate neurofeedback is a traditional therapy for OCD they had to have tried it.



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 10:13 PM
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Depending on where you live the magnetic field of the earth affects your brain chemistry. I wonder if there is a common link to the middle east attitude.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 05:06 PM
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A magnet does this.
Well I suppose so as I heard of a patent that claimed mood control.
Instead of impulses a bar magnet was rotated and thus the same as pulses.
The frequency of one rotation a second, can't recall exactly, calmed people down.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 05:51 PM
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I don't know why, but something about Dr. Phill pi***** me off. Maybe I'm just anti-authority. I'm sure that's a personality disorder. But anyway, this whole idea that everybody has to be "normal" is what gets me mad. I'll agree that OCD can be a bad thing. But here's the thing.... My sister, for example, has OCD. But she wasn't always as bad as she is now. She's destroyed. She's been reduced to a zombified nobody. I think other things in her life are more damaging than her OCD and make her OCD worse. She's resigned to it. I believe she had some form of Schizophrenia in the past too or something similar, but that's a point aside. What I'm saying is there're a million things wrong with her and the fact that she has OCD has become a scapegoat (excuse) for everything wrong in her life.

IMHO, kids have very little choice in family life. When I think about some of the kids out there, it worries me and makes me question this life. They're force fed everything from religion to habits to values to everything else. When a parent has a problem with their child they go to the hospital or the psychiatrist or the god-knows-what to fix it. As if!!!! Everything is fixable, right? I'm sorry, but I don't agree. IMHO, something is being locked up deep inside a lot of these people and throw into a deep dark pool of evil water. Lets hope that whatever is locked inside that water never EVER comes out.

Our society is sick with something. And these drugs and therapies aren't fixing it. My opinion. Instead what's happening is we're doing whatever is the easiest and most convenient, but it's not SOLVING the problem. It's just sweeping it under the rug so that "normal" people can get on with their lives.

I probably have OCPD. So maybe that's part of the reason I'm having this reaction. But it's also because I have a couple family members doped up on psychotropic drugs. It's for a lot of reasons, all of which I'm sure would be blamed on my OCPD. Since I have no proof, I guess I'm just irrational, eh? Just go grab a bottle and dope up and everything will be "normal". Normal is what scares me.

I used to move a lot when I was a kid. I just loved to run around and go into the forest and build things and my mind was always doing somethign. I think that if I was born now I'd probably be doped up because I'd be diagnosed with ADHD or something. Honestly, I had a lot of problems growing up, but there wasn't this big institution that we have now. Another part of it was that I was teased a lot, so maybe any problems I had were just blamed on that and overlooked. Either way, I'm glad that I wasn't doped up. There were already a lot of choices that were not in my hands. In my view, kids are more and more becoming acclimated to this institutionalized/authoritarian form of living.

World can have everything I have. Just don't take my mind from me. There's nothing I own, not even my computer, that's more valuable than freedom of thought and mind. I'd lose everything if I had to just to keep this freedom and not to be force fed or institutionalized or medicated or whatever. I've been homeless before and I can go back. I did ok. I can die too. This is me, like it or not.
edit on 22-10-2012 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



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