America Has A Secret Weapon

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posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 04:08 PM
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Dr. Michio Kaku: "The United States has the worst eductional system known to science."


Dr. Michio Kaku speaks about how America's poor educational system has created a shortage of Americans who can perform high skilled technology jobs. As a result, America's H-1B Genius visa is used to attract immigrants who are skilled enough to perform these jobs.

America's Secret Weapon:


Apparently, in 2007, $544 Million dollars went into programs related to the H-1B Visa. Foreign students come to the U.S. for their education and then leave.


In his floor statement on H-1B Visa Reform, Senator Dick Durbin stated "The H-1B visa job lasts for 3 years and can be renewed for 3 years. What happens to those workers after that? Well, they could stay. It is possible. But these new companies have a much better idea for making money. They send the engineers to America to fill spots--and get money to do it--and then after the 3 to 6 years, they bring them back to work for the companies that are competing with American companies. They call it their outsourcing visa. They are sending their talented engineers to learn how Americans do business and then bring them back and compete with those American companies. - Wiki


So basically the United States taxpayers PAY for the education of foreigners only to have most of them return to their country of origin and then compete against American companies! Yet, if this program were to be halted, the U.S. science based industry would come to a grinding halt!

Is this one of the only things holding up the States right now and keeping the country somewhat afloat? If so, it's only a patch job, it's not a fix!

I've heard some horror stories but this... this speaks volumes about the quality of the American education system!

I wonder if something similar is happening in my country, because the level of immigration has increased dramatically over the past decade.

What are your thoughts? Does anyone have anything to add to this?

- AeonStorm -

P.S. For the full video click here.
edit on 15-10-2012 by AeonStorm because: code, correction, added
edit on 17-10-2012 by davespanners because: Corrected Billion to Million




posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 04:39 PM
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Interesting. I've always felt the US lost its sense of urgency and commitment to education hence why we're slipping in rankings. Also, if the US spent more time on pursuing messages of the transformative power of education to climb out of poverty that would help too.

Edit - Something that is interesting is the best US universities are in Massachusetts and companies recruit heavily from these schools to keep the best performers in the US. Often setting up offices in Boston and the surrounding areas so they can use this talent base on site. US businesses try to keep the talent here.
edit on 15-10-2012 by Jason88 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 04:46 PM
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reply to post by Jason88
 


I wonder what the fundamental problem is with the education system there. Is it that the kids don't want to learn and just have this basic "entittlement" attitude, or is it the structure of the system? The teachers? .... I really don't have a clue since I'm up in Canada.

ETA: No doubt they would want to keep these people in the country and help drive the economy!


Although immigration generally requires short- and long-term visitors to disavow any ambition to seek the green card (permanent residency), H-1B visa holders are an important exception, in that the H-1B is legally acknowledged as a possible step towards a green card under what is called the doctrine of dual intent.


However:


Lower wages do not necessarily mean lower costs for employers. The cost to a company to sponsor a prospective employee for an H-1B visa can be significant, and it can vary between $1,440 and $5,000 depending on the attorney's fees (if used), the number of employees in the company, and if a premium is paid for faster service, without including the cost of a possible trip to the border of the country of origin, nor the renewal costs.[58] From August 14, 2010, the H-1B fee was increased by $2,000 for petitioners who employ 50 or more employees in the US with more than 50 percent of its employees in the US in H-1B or L (including L-1A, L-1B and L-2) nonimmigrant status as President Obama signed into law Public Law 111-230.[59] In addition to that, if the employer should dismiss the employee, the company is liable for any reasonable costs associated with relocation back to the employee's last foreign residence. (This provision covers only dismissal; it is not relevant when an employee chooses to resign.)[citation needed] Besides, there is no guarantee that the prospective employee will be granted the visa due to high demand, and the expenses are sometimes non-refundable.


Source
edit on 15-10-2012 by AeonStorm because: eta



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 04:53 PM
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Honestly, I think it really has to do with both "entitlement" and even "lazyness". Kids want to go to school to party and watch football half the time then based on education goals.\

I started college 20 years ago, and while I was pretty serious about my studies compared to some, I chose liberal arts instead of a hard science primarily because that was "easier". I had more aptitude towards it as well, so I am not knockin' myself here, but even then I had a portion of that mentality. I can't imagine what it is like now.

Kids want to use the technology we have, but not develop it.



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 05:31 PM
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reply to post by AeonStorm
 


kaku is wrong it's actually the best education system in history.
if you take into account that the main curriculum has replaced the 3 R's with
obedience, obeisance, and conformity



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 11:37 AM
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reply to post by AeonStorm
 
How does the US Taxpayer pays for 'their education' ? Care to explain?



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 09:15 PM
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reply to post by hp1229
 


Sure.


In 2007, the US Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (ETA), reported on two programs, the High Growth Training Initiative and Workforce Innovation Regional Economic Development (WIRED), which have received or will receive $284 million and $260 million, respectively, from H-1B training fees to educate and train US workers. Source


E.TA.

W.I.R.E.D.

D.O.L.
edit on 17-10-2012 by AeonStorm because: links



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 11:19 PM
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Check out the 80's whistle blower, Charlotte Iserbyte. She was a high-level education official under Reagan. Research her and you'll get your answers.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 11:38 PM
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I know I would love to go back to school to further my knowledge. I wouldn't even mind what field I studied.

I say that as nobody in my family has gone to college, so college planning wasn't ever in the cards due to financial reasons, parents were never really hard on me to get really good grades as they knew public school systems couldn't care less as long as you passed and got your diploma. Which was the norm for them, you get through school and get your diploma, get a job and live your life. That was life as far back as anyone in my family had gotten. It was a "normal life".

Just hard workers in my family that haven't really ever had much. We all just work and get by week to week.

Thats just the way the world is, I am told till this day. Well screw that. I'm tired of a debt based society that will only get worse as generation pass, and in doing so pass debt down through the generations.

I would love to learn new skills that would be useful in these jobs that are apparently all over that cannot find skilled individuals.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 11:51 PM
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No offense, but I thought this was pretty funny and relating to the post... I know it's not a true portrayal of Americans, but funny


youtu.be...
edit on 22-10-2012 by halfmanhalfamazing because: Trying to embed video



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 12:07 AM
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Originally posted by AeonStorm
reply to post by hp1229
 


Sure.


In 2007, the US Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (ETA), reported on two programs, the High Growth Training Initiative and Workforce Innovation Regional Economic Development (WIRED), which have received or will receive $284 million and $260 million, respectively, from H-1B training fees to educate and train US workers. Source


E.TA.

W.I.R.E.D.

D.O.L.

I think you read that backwards. H1-B fees are usually paid by the sponsor company. They are fees associated with the processing of the Visa so the employer is paying that US government a couple of grand and this money is being used to pay for the training of US workers.





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