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Possibly a unique photo opportunity for NASA's new Curiosity rover.

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posted on Oct, 3 2012 @ 10:54 AM
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From
news.nationalgeographic.com...


New Comet Bound for Glory?
Right now, 2012 S1 appears to be about 615 million miles (990 million kilometers) from Earth, between the orbits of Saturn and Jupiter, astronomers say.
As the sun's gravity pulls the comet closer, it should pass about 6.2 million miles (10 million kilometers) from Mars—possibly a unique photo opportunity for NASA's new Curiosity rover.


Guess NASA can try and plan for something like that Awesome
But what a unique way to prove to all debunker Curiosity rover is on Mar
As for me yes I Believe it on Mar’s
And yes the moon shots are real also.

Ongoing thread about C/2013 S1

2013 is gunna be an exciting year for cosmological phenomenon *Brightest comet in human history?*,
www.abovetopsecret.com...

New Comet: C/2012 S1 (ISON)
S1www.abovetopsecret.com...

Ho also sent e-mail to NASA to lauren.b.worley@nasa.gov
edit on 3-10-2012 by Trillium because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 3 2012 @ 11:48 AM
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reply to post by Trillium
 


A couple of questions come to mind about a possible comet photo opportunity for Curiosity (and I welcome anyone's input regarding these questions):

1. How large would the tail be and how bright could it be when the comet is near Mars, considering the tail lengthens, and the comet brightens, as it gets closer to the Sun?

2. What is the light-capturing capability of the cameras on Curiosity? Does NASA have a way of controlling the shutter speed, to keep it open longer to be able to get a good image of the comet?

I know that if I used a camera shutter speed set for daylight, I would not be able to capture enough light to see stars. Even if the comet does become visible from Curiosity's vantage point on Mars, would NASA be able to capture a picture of the comet with the shutter speeds available to them?

edit on 10/3/2012 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2012 @ 04:03 PM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People
reply to post by Trillium
 


A couple of questions come to mind about a possible comet photo opportunity for Curiosity (and I welcome anyone's input regarding these questions):

1. How large would the tail be and how bright could it be when the comet is near Mars, considering the tail lengthens, and the comet brightens, as it gets closer to the Sun?

2. What is the light-capturing capability of the cameras on Curiosity? Does NASA have a way of controlling the shutter speed, to keep it open longer to be able to get a good image of the comet?

I know that if I used a camera shutter speed set for daylight, I would not be able to capture enough light to see stars. Even if the comet does become visible from Curiosity's vantage point on Mars, would NASA be able to capture a picture of the comet with the shutter speeds available to them?

edit on 10/3/2012 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)


Very good question I google it with no luck so far
I send two different e-mail to Nasa no answer yet.
Maybe somebody here already know.



posted on Oct, 4 2012 @ 11:21 AM
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Here's Phobos in daylight so I think the comet should be doable if it lives up to its promise.
www.universetoday.com...

C/2013 S1 will be high in the Martian night sky when at its closest to Mars around the end of September.



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 05:28 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
Here's Phobos in daylight so I think the comet should be doable if it lives up to its promise.
www.universetoday.com...

C/2013 S1 will be high in the Martian night sky when at its closest to Mars around the end of September.



Thank Phage

As I still did not get any answer from my two different e-mail



posted on Oct, 6 2012 @ 04:43 AM
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I think the dusty atmosphere will be the biggest barrier. Curiosity might see a very faint streak during the day, and it isn't operational at night (at least I don't think it is).

Personally, I'm hoping for good Hubble images of the comet.



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 08:15 PM
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Well according to this site it should be able to do it


www.msss.com...


MAHLI can not only take close-up pictures with resolution as high as 15 microns (0.0006 inch) per pixel, it can also focus at infinity, allowing the camera to be used to take pictures at a variety of distances from the instrument


Now can your iphone give you better than this Don't think so





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