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On-line Degree. Thoughts Please??

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posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 11:39 PM
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I have a couple years until my yougest starts school. I am looking around the internet comparing on-line courses. Anybody have any suggestions? If you have already done this can you tell me a little about it, and if you had success??

I searched for similar thread and found 1 from 2007 with 0 replies
ugh




posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 11:49 PM
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Originally posted by MidnightSunshine
I have a couple years until my yougest starts school. I am looking around the internet comparing on-line courses. Anybody have any suggestions? If you have already done this can you tell me a little about it, and if you had success??

I searched for similar thread and found 1 from 2007 with 0 replies
ugh


Done 3 online classes. All basic anatomy and medical terminology. Cheaper and saves driving time. I liked it a lot. Just make sure the kid is responsible enough to get the assignments done on time. Mid terms and final exams were done at a monitored testing facility. Make sure the credits transfer to a university.



posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 11:54 PM
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reply to post by MidnightSunshine
 

Most real (red-brick or sandstone) universities and colleges offer online means of study, but there are many "shop-front" universities that will offer an online degree, be wary of those. Some degrees from shop-front uni's arnt recognized in some jurisdictions, so look for an online course that is offered by a real university in your state or territory.

Look at the top-level domain--institutions need to qualify to have an .edu in their URL, if they have a .com then its just some shop-front scam.

EDIT: Also consider open Universitys...
ocw.mit.edu...

edit on 1-10-2012 by cartenz because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 11:54 PM
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reply to post by MidnightSunshine
 


My brother did a computer science "online degree". The information is valid and given you put the required efforts and dedication to it, it's effective.

The big problem comes on the employment side where most businesses won't recognize it or give it less value compared to a real degree. It depends...



posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 11:57 PM
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reply to post by MidnightSunshine
 

I'm in a community college for my associates on graphic design tech and have tried the online courses twice. First as simple certification in computer networking and security and then after entering the formal degree track, for an English class in general ed requirements.

Neither time worked very well but that is primarily because I really need the structure that comes with the class to do well in the class. After all, if the topics were things I could self educate well on, I wouldn't need school right? lynda.com is under $40 a month compared to tuition rates... (and VERY similar in the lectures I know some courses do) Those were my thoughts by the second one.

The set up though was about the same on certification courses and the core college course. Sign in was through the school website and the majority was done that way in the general ed course. 100% in the certification ones. (you printed your own certs on those too... kinda self-education at it's most basic).

The English course was an assignment out each week by web, a forum to discuss and sometimes posting as part of the assignment and then I believe it was a requirement to show up on mid term and final. I can't say because it didn't take more than a few weeks to see it wasn't working how I needed it to and I took the state English class this past summer....but the online works very well for other students I talk to who work well at home and without instructors at all.

I will say that during the first research I did before getting the certificate courses going, I learned the source is very important for accreditation status and whether it means enough to show a future employer at all (a full online degree program) or whether it's worth about as much as a printed photoshop certificate from someone off the street.

Personally, and just the feeling I have..... I wouldn't look at online programs that aren't run by a real school with real faculty that have actual students in another physical location.

Just my thoughts.



posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 11:58 PM
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reply to post by MidnightSunshine
 


If you navigate a computer comfortably and are comfortable using MS Office, uploading and downloading documents, storing them on the computer, using a chat functions, message boards, etc. then online school is the way to go. It simply takes too much time to sit in classes at a traditional school, when most online colleges you get to pick when you will do your work. Although, the cost is sometimes higher then traditional education, for a person that intends to work and go to school its the way to go. I do not recommend online schools for younger adults, as they may lack the commitment to log on and manage their tasks and assignments. It has been my experience with younger adults that sitting in a classroom, socializing after classes and between, helps keep their minds at school. Whereas online, you really have to want to learn yourself as you have nobody really to explain things.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:01 AM
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reply to post by MidnightSunshine
 


One other thing...look for regional accreditation with any online school. Most do not have this accreditation. Regional accreditation is what most public universities have as their accreditation.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:11 AM
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reply to post by MidnightSunshine
 

Bear in mind that many credits may NOT be transferable, in case the idea is to save early on then go on to University to finish. Other than that.... cheaper, on your own time frame... sounds good.... too good?



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:12 AM
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reply to post by MidnightSunshine
 


Well here's a video you might find interesting below. Definitely watch this. And anyone thinking about college should watch this...

Okay here's what I would do if I were you. And this is just me. But I know marketing and I know how employers think. The degree teaches you basically nothing. Forget the idea that somehow this knowledge from the degree is gonna give you anything. I mean if you wanna think that, fine go ahead. It's up to you, but there's books out like MBA in a Day, and stuff like that. Showing you everything you'd learn in a Degree program in a condensed version.

Here's what I'd do......

I'd find the best school I could possibly get into. You want brand names, like Harvard, Princeston, MIT or some other big name school. If not that big at least your big local state university. Get into there online school if they have one. Generally admission to the online school is easy.

Once you get in add that to your resume. Saying something like "University of California at Berkley 2012 - Studying Commerce"

So there you go! That's all you need! If you're using the degree to get a job, all you need is the name of the school on your resume. That's all you need! YOu don't need the degree. Again you just need to show under "Education" on your resume the name of Brand Name college or university.

You can get that job right now. You just got to show on a resume that you are enrolled in a big school. You dont have to finish a degree. Employers could care less if you finished. They need help now. And they're gonna retrain you in very specific skills anyway.

If you're just trying to get some mid level manager roll in corporate america or something like that, then you dont need the degree! All you need is something close on your resume. Like your attending. That will get you the interview and if they like you you get the job. In all honesty, if they like you you might not even need that. But again that's only if you're thinking in terms of getting a job.

But if you just want the degree then that's different. A degree from a crappy unknown school is worthless on a resume btw.

What I'm driving at is this....All I'm saying is kids get brainwashed into thinking "they need the degree" in order to get interviews. NO YOU DON'T!!! NO YOU DON'T!!! But it would help if you can say on your resume something like what I said earilier: "University of California at Berkley 2012 - Studying Commerce" So you get into there online school and then put that on your resume and then immediately go applying for jobs. so if an employer asks you, you say "yes I'm attending X school and I enjoy the program but I'd rather be working and learning hands on". Or something like that. It shows the employer you're trying because you're in college, and it saves you money because you'll likely find a job, and you'll only end up 5k in debt rather than 50k in debt. Anyway I know I'd go that way.

Again degree's are completely worthless in this economy. What is valuable is very specific skill sets, and being an expert at something. Degree's basically generally mean, "I'm now qualified to interview". But there's nothign saying you can't interview now. Both situations you're a dumb azz, employers full well know this. And they know they'll have to retrain your butt anyway. You're an expert at nothing with just degree. You have zero experience. So anyway I'm just ranting... here's that video....








edit on 2-10-2012 by r2d246 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:30 AM
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reply to post by r2d246
 


not all degrees are worthless, I just started an LLB--try practicing law without one.

Just to note, Im not doing my LLB online.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 11:50 AM
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I finished the last two years through an online university, many years after I completed the first two in a traditional setting. It worked out great for me. You have to have the discipline to know your deadlines, as I only attended "class" for one hour, twice a week per class. I have not been turned away from any job so far, due to having a non-traditional bachelors degree.

Others have said that a degree doesn't mean anything in this economy, but I disagree. That's a foolish thing to say. Many companies want to see a degree. It has more to do with demonstrating your dedication to achieve than actual ability to do the job sometimes, but it's still an essential advantage in the workforce.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:01 PM
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Good for you. I wish I had restarted a few years ago when I was at home with my son instead of waiting for him to be in school.

I'd stay away from schools that are exclusively online. Way too many scams to sift through or worrying about transfers.

Just go to the university you eventually wish to get your degree. They should offer most of your basics with online versions. I'm currently in school and do some classes online mixed in with my in person classes. I wish online classes had been around as the norm when I attended the first time. Lol

Best of luck to you. You are on the right track.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by MidnightSunshine
 


Online degree? Um... no. NO NO NO!

And here's my reasoning - while it's been said "Why Do You Care What Other People Think", employers do care about cookie-cutter degrees and the like. Although, it also depends on what you want to "learn" in that perhaps you want just enough education to perform. It's all about employment these days, isn't it. Not like it used to be, when one went to college to learn something, and not just a skill-set for a specialized trade. So, you have some decisions to make.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by MidnightSunshine
 


On line courses can be fine for older adults or for supervised kids.

Most people talk about their college years in terms of the activities they did and the people they met, not about what they learned. College today is a place to grow up, a place to network with other people, a place to party, a place to share ideas, and a place to try out new skills.

I wouldn't deprive my kid of the experience.

However, there is nothing wrong with trade school. Plumbers always have a job.

There is nothing wrong with the army or navy as a place to grow up that offers some of the same experiences and can teach some of the same skills.

Many universities offer free courses on line. Have your kid try one and see how he does. It is not for credit but the info learned is the same. Take some on line classes and then test out of the classes at whatever college your kid wants to attend. It might save you a semester or two of costs.





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