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"Meteoroids Change Atmospheres of Earth, Mars, Venus"

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posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


What you are missing in constructing you argument of semantics is that there are many factors involved in affecting global warming which has been increasing in a rapid rate of increase over the past 11,500 years.

O-tay my buddy?




posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 04:58 PM
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Originally posted by AndyMayhew


Originally posted by LilDudeissocool
Well, well, well more evidence that evil man made global warming might have another source,

I guess you didn't read or understand the article you quoted. But don't worry, the mutant star goat will be here soon .....


I refer you to the same text I've stated above in the last post to the hang glide dude.


Originally posted by AndyMayhew
Seriously, did you have to spoil an interesting science story with religio-political nonsense entirely unrelated to it?


Tell that to the scientist who make it such.



That cuts both ways btw.
edit on 12-9-2012 by LilDudeissocool because: I had to fix the quote boxes.



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by LilDudeissocool

Funny how there is really nothing published about meteor shower activity over the past 50-60 years as far as studying the activity rates are concerned.

Are you sure about that?


I don't think he (or she) is Phage...

If you look, there is actually plenty of evidence that meteor showers have been heavily scrutinized for the last century, and even before this.

The turning point was the great Leonid storm of 1833, which is when modern meteor observing was born, but as I mentioned above, meteor observing has been around for much longer. Indeed, there are historical records of meteor showers being observed by Chinese (amongst others) observers going back well over 2000 years.



Abstract
We have compiled and analyzed historical Korean meteor and meteor shower records in three Korean official history books, Samguksagi which covers the three Kingdoms period (57 B.C -- A.D. 935), Goryeosa of Goryeo dynasty (A.D. 918 -- 1392), and Joseonwangjosillok of Joseon dynasty (A.D. 1392 -- 1910). We have found 3861 meteor and 31 meteor shower records. We have confirmed the peaks of Perseids and an excess due to the mixture of Orionids, north-Taurids, or Leonids through the Monte-Carlo test. The peaks persist from the period of Goryeo dynasty to that of Joseon dynasty, for almost one thousand years. Korean records show a decrease of Perseids activity and an increase of Orionids/north-Taurids/Leonids activity. We have also analyzed seasonal variation of sporadic meteors from Korean records. We confirm the seasonal variation of sporadic meteors from the records of Joseon dynasty with the maximum number of events being roughly 1.7 times the minimum. The Korean records are compared with Chinese and Japanese records for the same periods. Major features in Chinese meteor shower records are quite consistent with those of Korean records, particularly for the last millennium. Japanese records also show Perseids feature and Orionids/north-Taurids/Leonids feature, although they are less prominent compared to those of Korean or Chinese records.

Source: Analysis of historical meteor and meteor shower records: Korea, China, and Japan


For reference:

The Early Years of Meteor Observations in the USA
Leonid meteors found in Chinese historical records
The Leonid Meteor Shower Revealed: Shooting Star Show's Brilliant History
Meteor Showers Online (This calendar includes the history of may of the showers listed)



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by FireballStorm
 


You don't think he or she is? If ATS is considered an internet bacteria we all could be phage.


I appreciate the information. You wouldn't have a blog pertaining to this subject matter historical meteor events and so-forth by any chance? Something that puts meteor activity data into a historical graph?

You know I checked the JPL web site and they have NOTHING! I'm not sure what they are getting paid for. Maybe JPL has counterparts in other parts of the world, they might have comprehensive data available pertaining to the subject of historic meteor activity. Not sure where to find it on sites like this one> www.federalspace.ru... I don't read Russian.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 07:29 PM
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Originally posted by LilDudeissocool
reply to post by FireballStorm
 

You don't think he or she is?


...sure about there being nothing published regarding meteor activity rates over the past 50-60 years.



Originally posted by LilDudeissocool
You wouldn't have a blog pertaining to this subject matter historical meteor events and so-forth by any chance? Something that puts meteor activity data into a historical graph?


Sorry, I don't.

I'm not sure such a thing exists anyway...

One thing you could try is a domain search for "adsabs.harvard.edu".

The point I'm making is that although there is no graph/set of data to represent the change over time of the influx of meteoroids from all sources as a whole that I know of, individual sources have been carefully monitored for many decades for the most part

That said, we are still learning about that part of the meteoroid population that cause the large fireballs which are relatively rare and unpredictable. In the past these were hard to study, but with modern all sky camera networks that are devoted to capturing these events and better reporting of these events, we are starting to get a better picture

The vast majority of the total meteoroid flux is in the form of dust sized particles however, which has been better studied.

We see natural variations in the influx of various sources over the course of the year, and from year to year, but I think over decades these would probably more or less average out I suspect.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 09:12 PM
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In the past these were hard to study, but with modern all sky camera networks that are devoted to capturing these events and better reporting of these events, we are starting to get a better picture
reply to post by FireballStorm
 



So labs like JPL still don't record the overall activity rates?

Any ideas as to why the lack of interest to do so?



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 11:01 PM
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reply to post by LilDudeissocool
 


As far as I know they don't/haven't. NASA's interest in the subject seems to be growing over recent years (the setup of their All Sky Fireball Network a few years back is one example of this), so we may see the type of data you are looking for in coming years.

NASA/JPL never were really at the forefront of meteor science though - most research has historically been done by smaller organizations and university researchers.

You could try contacting Dr. Bill Cooke (NASA - see the link I posted above), or better yet post a question on METEOROBS (The Meteor Observing mailing list), which would be seen by many researchers including Bill Cooke, one of which might be able to point you in the right direction for the type of study you are looking for.



posted on Sep, 16 2012 @ 06:13 PM
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reply to post by FireballStorm
 


The historic data could be compiled like polling data is to give an overall indicator of activity then placing that information on a graph. Now with the skies being totally covered the data does not have to be estimated. Seems like an elementary task. So again, don't you think such data not being compiled comprehensively is a bit peculiar, and why would it not be compiled and formatted into a historic graph?

Ever see this> channel.nationalgeographic.com... on NGC? If you did they explain just 7,000 years ago Niagara Falls was a trickle. And now it's not. Why is that?

What has been going on for the past 11,500 yeas that has changed our planet's climate so dramatically?

I'm pretty sure not THIS>



posted on Sep, 16 2012 @ 06:14 PM
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Originally posted by FireballStorm
reply to post by LilDudeissocool
 


You could try contacting Dr. Bill Cooke (NASA - see the link I posted above), or better yet post a question on METEOROBS (The Meteor Observing mailing list), which would be seen by many researchers including Bill Cooke, one of which might be able to point you in the right direction for the type of study you are looking for.


Do you think he will compile the data and format it in a comprehensible form for general consumption?



posted on Sep, 17 2012 @ 01:02 PM
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Originally posted by LilDudeissocool
The historic data could be compiled like polling data is to give an overall indicator of activity then placing that information on a graph. Now with the skies being totally covered the data does not have to be estimated.


I wouldn't say that the skies are "totally covered" by a long way, but we are getting to the stage where there is enough coverage to sample enough of the total to be able to get a good idea of actual rates.



Originally posted by LilDudeissocool
Seems like an elementary task. So again, don't you think such data not being compiled comprehensively is a bit peculiar, and why would it not be compiled and formatted into a historic graph?


I don't think it's particularly peculiar given that there does not appear to be a significant change in the flux over the years.

Anyway, I'm not 100% sure that this data does not exist.




Originally posted by LilDudeissocool

Originally posted by FireballStorm
reply to post by LilDudeissocool
 


You could try contacting Dr. Bill Cooke (NASA - see the link I posted above), or better yet post a question on METEOROBS (The Meteor Observing mailing list), which would be seen by many researchers including Bill Cooke, one of which might be able to point you in the right direction for the type of study you are looking for.


Do you think he will compile the data and format it in a comprehensible form for general consumption?


I very much doubt it, but if the data/graph you are looking for does already exist, I don't see why he, or someone else (Bill Cooke is not the "be all/end all" when it comes to the science of meteors) wouldn't point you in the right direction to find it.





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