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just a question on the value of aluminum

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posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 05:00 PM
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ok, i know there is more intelligent people here that can do the math and give me an answer!
i am collecting beer/soda/canned soup tabs for the guy next door, ' so little jimmy can get a wheelchair'!
any way,(don't wanna hear it!!!).....
i got about 5 LBS. 'o' tabs saved up.
(mostly beer--- shut up! i have ex's and a mother already!!!
)
i'm hoping the 'people in the know on ats!
what is what i have worth???
5 LBS of aluminum 'pop' tins!
what say you?




posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 05:16 PM
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this articles on snopes might help.
keeping tabs




A million pull tabs have a recycle value of about $366 U.S. And that's before you factor in what it costs to collect, store, and transport them to a recycling center which will pay cash for them. When you consider the time and effort it takes to collect a million of anything, it's a wonder anyone would go to all that trouble for a mere $366. Far better to ask everyone you know for a penny in place of each pull tab they would have given you — at least then when you were done collecting your million, you'd have $10,000 to donate to your charity. To put this in even clearer perspective, 100 pull tabs have a scrap metal value of about 3½¢. That old "something for nothing" dream gets people every time. Spring 1997 produced a poignant example of this madness in the form of a news story about a crippled child in a remote Canadian community and that community's good-hearted belief that if only they could save up eight million pull tabs, they could get her a much-needed wheelchair. The local community health center made a project of collecting these little bits of metal, and it was only after they'd gathered more than a million that they realized not only didn't they have a buyer for them, they also hadn't figured out how they were going to transport them from their town (roughly 2500 miles north of Montreal) to any place with a recycling plant: "We just thought we needed eight million tabs," said Linda Tucktoo, who helped organize the drive and assumed there was a program to trade tabs for wheelchairs. "I didn't know it was so much trouble." Charity groups and the aluminum industry say they have been fighting misconceptions about collecting pop can tabs for years. "Unfortunately, it's one of those urban myths," said Denise Bekkema, executive director of Storefront for Volunteer Agencies in Yellowknife. "We actually get calls, probably about two a year, from people who have collected oodles and oodles of tabs from pop cans and then wanting to donate them to make wheelchairs. But there's actually no such program."



 
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