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Book Of Abramelin The mage, A fiction.

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posted on Sep, 5 2012 @ 08:31 PM
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The grimoire is framed as a sort of epistolary novel or autobiography in which Abraham of Worms describes his journey from Germany to Egypt and reveals Abramelin's magical and Kabbalistic secrets to his son Lamech. Internally the text dates itself to the year 1458. (One might reconsider the date of the text, considering that the book Nicolas Flamel brought to Spain was also recognised as being part of the original book of Abraham the Mage, but dates back to 1378, which is nearly 80 years earlier.)

The work may be roughly classified:
First book: = Advice and autobiography; both addressed by the author to his son Lamech.
Second book: = General and complete description of the means of obtaining the magical powers desired.
Third book: = The application of these powers to produce an immense number of magical results.


Outside of the first part really just fiction and imagination of the Author's mind, a nice bed story
for someone who enjoys creepy stories of the Golden Dawn, the Augoeides of Iamblichus, the Atman of Hinduism and the Daemon of the Gnostics.

In Ceremonial Magic or High Magic, the single most important goal is to connect with one’s own Holy Guardian Angel, a process called the “Knowledge and Conversation” in which the magician or spiritual aspirant becomes fully aware of his own True Will. This concept of a Holy Guardian Angel and the importance of gaining contact with him, has greatly influenced modern Hermeticism, Rosicrucianism and perhaps to a lesser extent Neo-Paganism.





The author of the book is believed to have been Abraham of Würzburg (Abraham of Worms), a Jewish physician, Kabbalist, Magus and political advisor to such men as Emperor Sigismond of Germany (1368-1437). The book is divided into three parts or book’s, Book I contains his autobiography in which he describes his years of wondering in a quest for the “True and Sacred Source of Wisdom”. During his travels he learned about several systems of magic, but found the most of them disappointing.


The book is a remnant of the popularisation of the occult in the Victorian age, when self-styled sorcerers convinced themselves they were tapping into some source of unfathomable power. They were not, they were self-deluded or attempting to delude others.

Later, Aleistair Crowley the occultist perhaps the most well known tries to seize on the book's success and authors a number of books based on the same platform. Crowley himself didn’t take much credit for having written any of them, as he stated they were written by automatic handwriting, being channeled from a higher being called Aiwaz. This being said he had lived in Caldea during the reign of Hammurabis (around 1750 BC), but later, in his book “Magick in Theory and Practice”, Crowley identified Aiwaz as his own genius.

Sources




posted on Sep, 5 2012 @ 09:06 PM
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i am familiar with the book you speak of.
what i don't understand is the title.
do you think it is a work of fiction?
if so, please explain!
your post just kind of ends,with no conclusion!
good info though!
i also have read the holy books of thelema,and found them interesting
'love is the law'
you forgot to shed a bit of light on macgregor mathers,who translated the work in question into english.
he was head of the golden dawn,and was the main reason crowley left.
any way,i hope you add more to this post,it got my attention!



posted on Sep, 5 2012 @ 10:33 PM
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Originally posted by reficul
i am familiar with the book you speak of.
what i don't understand is the title.
do you think it is a work of fiction?
if so, please explain!
your post just kind of ends,with no conclusion!
good info though!
i also have read the holy books of thelema,and found them interesting
'love is the law'
you forgot to shed a bit of light on macgregor mathers,who translated the work in question into english.
he was head of the golden dawn,and was the main reason crowley left.
any way,i hope you add more to this post,it got my attention!


Crowley Seized the work Mathers to his advantage in order to bring people under his own umbrella of Orders like Thelema which was a disguised Illimunatti and freemasonry secret societies, he successfully managed to fill the vaccum for when Mathers died and steered everyone under his own created Orders.



posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 07:28 AM
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Something seems to have been written over the word "BOOK" on the book cover you posted. What do you suppose that is?



posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 08:14 AM
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Originally posted by hotbread

The book is a remnant of the popularisation of the occult in the Victorian age, when self-styled sorcerers convinced themselves they were tapping into some source of unfathomable power. They were not, they were self-deluded or attempting to delude others.



I hate to be Capitan Obvious here, but 1368-1437 is NOT anywhere near the Victorian age. The Victorian era runs from 1837 until 1901... Far from the 14th century which is Renaissance... there was no obsession with the occult in most of the world at the time, they were burning "witches"...
edit on 6-9-2012 by Invariance because: (no reason given)






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