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How do they do that? Add yours

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posted on Aug, 12 2012 @ 01:45 PM
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I have a couple of questions that probably won't take too many replies to answer, so feel free to use this thread to ask your own 'How do they do that?'

When using an atom smasher, such as the Large Hadron Collider, how do scientists grab just one teeny-tiny atom in order to smash it?

Same with the Double-Slit experiment. How do they create just one photon and then how do they aim it at the slits?




posted on Aug, 12 2012 @ 02:11 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


I don't believe they can isolate one single atom or photon. I imagine that what they do is apply probability functions to the observed results and extrapolate it down to a single element. I am in no way, shape or form a physicist or mathematician, this is just my best guess.



posted on Aug, 12 2012 @ 02:54 PM
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Originally posted by N3k9Ni
reply to post by jiggerj
 


I don't believe they can isolate one single atom or photon. I imagine that what they do is apply probability functions to the observed results and extrapolate it down to a single element.


Okay, so they smash two atoms. lol Three? How about a ball bearing? Like you, I have NO clue.



posted on Aug, 12 2012 @ 02:57 PM
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Really good thread in my opinion. I'm surprised after an hour nobody has given it any attention.

Well, yes, they do, but we now prefer to call them by their less aggression-centered name, "particle harmony disrupters." Of course some atom smashers do much more smashing than others. We use electrons in our accelerator to study the nucleus of an atom. Remember that electrons are negative, as are the electrons surrounding the target. Since like charged particles repel each other, our particles have to have enough energy to blast through that electron cloud to get to the nucleus. The electrons then speed on toward the nucleus and usually miss. Yes, most of our electrons miss the nucleus. Remember, atoms are very small and nuclei are REALLY small. Enough electrons do hit the nucleus to make the studies useful, though. Usually the electron is deflected back out of the nucleus where we note its path with the particle detectors we've built. Occasionally the electron goes in and knocks out a proton or neutron. So you see, we do smash atoms.
Source I honestly have no idea what they're talking about, but I hope it helps. Maybe someone can explain in more simple terms.ETA: Here is another source as well. HOW STUFF WORKS
edit on 12-8-2012 by GD21D because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2012 @ 05:20 PM
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Originally posted by GD21D
Really good thread in my opinion. I'm surprised after an hour nobody has given it any attention.

Well, yes, they do, but we now prefer to call them by their less aggression-centered name, "particle harmony disrupters." Of course some atom smashers do much more smashing than others. We use electrons in our accelerator to study the nucleus of an atom. Remember that electrons are negative, as are the electrons surrounding the target. Since like charged particles repel each other, our particles have to have enough energy to blast through that electron cloud to get to the nucleus. The electrons then speed on toward the nucleus and usually miss. Yes, most of our electrons miss the nucleus. Remember, atoms are very small and nuclei are REALLY small. Enough electrons do hit the nucleus to make the studies useful, though. Usually the electron is deflected back out of the nucleus where we note its path with the particle detectors we've built. Occasionally the electron goes in and knocks out a proton or neutron. So you see, we do smash atoms.
Source I honestly have no idea what they're talking about, but I hope it helps. Maybe someone can explain in more simple terms.ETA: Here is another source as well. HOW STUFF WORKS
edit on 12-8-2012 by GD21D because: (no reason given)


Thank you for this. I read it and I still don't know if my answer is in there. I thought I was a rare breed in not knowing how atoms are handled - guess not.



posted on Aug, 12 2012 @ 05:26 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


Another question:

Could SETI be doing it wrong? I just watched a clip that briefly mentioned how when searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, the antennae are aimed at stars to see if any radio waves are being emitted from there.

I thought the light we see from stars has taken millions of years to get here. So, the stars aren't even there anymore. Right? If so, shouldn't the SETI antennae be aimed at where we CAN'T see the stars?



posted on Aug, 15 2012 @ 04:55 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


I have the Cern website up and it reads,

Inside the accelerator, two beams of particles travel at close to the speed of light with very high energies before colliding with one another.


Beams of particles? What does that mean? How are these beams generated?

Anyone? Anyone? Anyone?

How the LHC Works



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