Egypt president sacks defence minister

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posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 05:07 AM
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reply to post by KeliOnyx
 





Really if you have been following what has been going on here this isn't unexpected. First the Egyptian Military held the reigns of power. They were also instrumental in removing the previous regime. The current President has to remove those people. Also the Egyptian military has been trying to set policy and keep legislative power. This cannot be allowed if they are to have a civilian government. Most of if not all the positional moves he has made make sense and look to be honestly inclusive.


I agree Keli. Morsi had to send a symbolic and real signal to the armed forces- you take orders from me now.

Inclusiveness is the crucial test of this government. If they are Islamist fine, but that cannot be used to persecute any other groups which must be protected by the rule of law.




posted on Aug, 15 2012 @ 12:03 AM
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The most important thing for the Egyptian populace is that all citizens are respected their equal rights protected in this new Egypt.
reply to post by Peruvianmonk
 


I'm sure human rights will be protected by the Muslim Brotherhood...
As long as you don't consider women, Christians and apostates human



posted on Aug, 15 2012 @ 04:34 AM
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reply to post by glasshouse
 


Well we shall see won't we. I just don't see your standard Egyptian putting up with any bull# extremism though. Just check out the women in Tunisia, out protesting against a stupid change to the constitution that will see women as "complementary to men".


Thousands of Tunisians have protested in the capital, Tunis, against moves by the Islamist-led government which they fear will reduce women's rights. The government has unveiled a draft constitution which refers to women as "complementary to men".



Ennahda member Farida al-Obeidi, who chairs the constitutional assembly's human rights and public freedoms panel, said the wording of the draft constitution was not a backward step for Tunisian women, Reuters reports. Instead, the draft stipulates the "sharing of roles and does not mean that women are worth less than men", she said.

But the chairperson of the Democratic Women's Association, Ahlam Belhadj, condemned the clause. "Major retreats usually begin with one step," she said. "If we stay silent today, we will open the door to everything else and end up surprised by even more serious decisions."


www.bbc.co.uk...

I think this is an appropriate video for the women/minorities of the Middle East from now on.




posted on Aug, 15 2012 @ 01:21 PM
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reply to post by Peruvianmonk
 


I guess it depends on how large of a role Sharia will play in the legal system.
More Sharia = Less rights for women



posted on Aug, 17 2012 @ 11:17 AM
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reply to post by glasshouse
 


Hassan al-Banna, the founder of the MB, had this to say on the treatment of women


Following are the principal goals of reform grounded on the spirit of genuine Islam ... Treatment of the problem of women in a way which combines the progressive and the protective, in accordance with Islamic teaching, so that this problem – one of the most important social problems – will not be abandoned to the biased pens and deviant notions of those who err in the directions of deficiency and excess ... a campaign against ostentation in dress and loose behaviour; the instruction of women in what is proper, with particular strictness as regards female instructors, pupils, physicians, and students, and all those in similar categories ... a review of the curricula offered to girls and the necessity of making them distinct from the boys' curricula in many stages of education ... segregation of male and female students; private meetings between men and women, unless within the permitted degrees of relationship, to be counted as a crime for which both will be censured ... the encouragement of marriage and procreation, by all possible means; promulgation of legislation to protect and give moral support to the family, and to solve the problems of marriage ... the closure of morally undesirable ballrooms and dance-halls, and the prohibition of dancing and other such pastimes ....


"Toward the Light" in Five Tracts of Hasan al-Banna, trans. by Charles Wendell (Berkeley, 1978)

How today's Brotherhood will interpret this remains to be seen.





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