Flawless second day on Mars for Curiosity, high-res pic (including R/B 3D)

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posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 06:38 AM
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To the left of the panorama about half way up there looks like a shiny sphere

At the end of a rock sticking up that looks like a table.




posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 06:42 AM
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Originally posted by Awen24
I don't understand how it is that $200 billion only buys you a black and white camera these days.
I really don't.


Cuz it didn't cost 200 billion... oh and -- they have color cameras, they monotone them so they can receive them faster.

Do you know how they get pictures on earth taken from mars without it physically being carried back?

edit on 9-8-2012 by Laokin because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 06:51 AM
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Originally posted by VoidHawk
This looks like two VERY RECENTLY dried up puddles. They look like they are still a little damp.


They were made by the hydrazine MLE's (Mars Lander Engines) on the final descent phase. There should be two more like it exactly opposite those two.



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 06:56 AM
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reply to post by PW229
 


So that explains the dust displacement and the exposed bedrock?

Must have been a lot of dirt fying around



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 07:07 AM
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Why would it take a year to get to the base of the mountain? How fast (or slow) does Curosity go?
I'm assuming it's because they only drive a few feet or so, take pics, a sample or two, then move on?



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 07:08 AM
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reply to post by Awen24
 


Because you haven't read much about the project and your not really the brightest bulb out there. But what the hay you got a computer and time on your hands



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 07:09 AM
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reply to post by HomerinNC
 


Really quite slow.


Curiosity will trundle around its landing site looking for interesting rock features to study. Its top speed is about 4cm/s


www.bbc.co.uk...



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 07:11 AM
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Originally posted by bkfd54
I am getting pretty damn tired of looking at rocks.


At some point in the future I'm really hoping that NASA do a bit of investigating and come up with a really plausible hypothesis for the following highly unusual and statistically improbable geological feature.




posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 07:51 AM
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reply to post by bkfd54
 

Thank you Sir.


reply to post by dontlaughthink
 

Isn´t it a nice one!



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 07:53 AM
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reply to post by tauristercus
 


Presumably it's the same/similar process that cause volcanic island chains - crustal movement over a magma plume.

edit on 9-8-2012 by BagBing because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 07:54 AM
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I am going a little bit of topic here regarding the rover, but I just think this picture is stunning, and still Mars, so why not.

Proctor Crater.
Taken with the HiRISE camera.

The relatively bright, small ridges are ripples. From their study on Earth, and close-up examination by the MER rovers (roving elsewhere on Mars), scientists surmise that the ripples are composed of fine sand (less than 200 microns in diameter) or fine sand coated with coarser sand and granules.

The larger, darker bedforms are dunes composed of sand, most likely of fine size. Ripples tend to move slower than dunes. Because of this, over time, ripples get covered with dust, possibly explaining the bright tone visible here. The dunes are dark probably because they are composed of basaltic sand (derived from dark, volcanic rock) that is blown by the wind enough that dust does not sufficiently accumulate to change their color.


NASA info


Here you can download the picture in 2880. Since I was not able to put that resolution in the post.
uahirise.org
Clouds at the bottom left?
edit on 9-8-2012 by LiberalSceptic because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 07:56 AM
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Originally posted by Mianeye
Just a little teaser of what to come



This is the latest panorama released by NASA July 2012. It was assembled from 817 images taken between Dec. 21, 2011, and May 8, 2012, while Opportunity was stationed on an outcrop informally named 'Greeley Haven'. on a segment of the rim of ancient Endeavour Crater.


360 degree panaoramic interactive moving view of Mars taken by Opportunity Rover.

www.panoramas.dk...

edit on 9-8-2012 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)
edit on 9-8-2012 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)


Finally!!!
Now were talking!!!!

Thank you very much for that link.



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 08:00 AM
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reply to post by LiberalSceptic
 


Since rover before the latest had a better Camera(as well as one with panoramic capabilities), i'm hoping MSL would have a better one, just got to wait patiently.



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 08:02 AM
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reply to post by DjangoPhat
 


Well my friend, the fourth pic is also put together from several ones.
There is another pic as well that shows that a little clearer (more black like nr3), though I choose this one because it was a tad bigger.

This is the other one that shows it better.



Wow, every time I look at those mountains!
Just amazing.
edit on 9-8-2012 by LiberalSceptic because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 08:03 AM
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Originally posted by BagBing
reply to post by tauristercus
 


Presumably it's the same/similar process that cause volcanic island chains - crustal movement over a magma plume.


You're missing my point, unfortunately.

All 3 are PERFECTLY aligned and are separated from each other by EXACTLY 747 kms ... unusual to say the least.

If NASA intends to send future robotic explorers to Mars, I would suggest this location as being one of extreme interest.



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 08:10 AM
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reply to post by HomerinNC
 


I would assume that that period of time is estimated including the schedule of remarkable things to do on the way, yes.



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 08:13 AM
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reply to post by LiberalSceptic
 


Thanks for the explanation.



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 08:14 AM
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reply to post by luciddream
 


Ye but to wait for things like this is a hard thing to do




posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 08:15 AM
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reply to post by DjangoPhat
 


No problemas my friend.
Though I am far from an expert so do not take my word for it



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 08:18 AM
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reply to post by tauristercus
 


I got the point you were making, but the reality is they are not perfectly aligned, nor perfectly equidistant. Pretty close, yes, but that's not the same.

The actual reason for the alignement is not understood - and it's been know about since 1971.

To quote wiki



Most researchers agree that Valles Marineris is a large tectonic "crack" in the Martian crust that formed as the crust thickened in the Tharsis region to the west, and was subsequently widened by erosional forces. However, near the eastern flanks of the rift there appear to be some channels that may have been formed by water or carbon dioxide.
edit on 9-8-2012 by BagBing because: (no reason given)





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