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Thousands of skeletons found in London burial pit

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posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 06:10 AM
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Lets not sidetrack the post with an argument over the source of information
A quick google search brings up plenty of other sources
That are relevent to both parts of the post

Cran




posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 06:18 AM
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The burials were those of plague victims in London, they needed to bury them quickly so Spitalfields was the place to do it. Unless historical records have been changed - it wouldn't be the first time.



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 07:36 AM
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Well since thousands died from sulphur dioxide poisoning in 1783, those being mainly outdoor workers, I'd hedge my bets on this being an earlier Icelandic eruption that caused it.



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 08:21 AM
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Maybe carbon dating is off, so they then there are left with ??? so then a big earthquake must be the answer.


carbon dating makes one huge assumption: radioactive decay rates remain constant and always have been constant


Btw if so many died in London because of this earthquake, you should see similar mass deaths in other Europian (major) city's as well.
I think it should have been in history books if that happened, not something they would forget.
edit on 6-8-2012 by Plugin because: (no reason given)
edit on 6-8-2012 by Plugin because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 09:07 AM
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reply to post by cranspace
 


That's very interesting, this find goes to the very begging of the " little ice age".
At the end of the 12 th century, climatic rebound from the 6th century eruption of krakatoa , combined natural solar cycles started the little ice age, and it was compounded by other eruptions in the 13th, 14th,18th and finally tambora in the 1830s.
A couple of weeks ago I saw an episode of a BBC doc. about a particular town in England. The doc follows the history of this town from its founding in the 10th ? century up to the early 20th century. The episode I saw focused on the 13th - 15th centuries and covered the plagues and famines of the tome and thier socio-political ramifications. One thing they did cover was the plagues of the late 13th cent. before the black death. In the 1250's and how the population of the British isles fell from over 6 million in the mid 13th cent to under 2 million by 1350.



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 10:44 AM
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reply to post by cranspace
 


cmon...really...a volcano hhahaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa...pure BS
trying to cover the BS they got up to in the past

peace



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 06:20 PM
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reply to post by tazdeill2
 


I refer you to this video



Originally posted by studio500




Which states this happened 100 years before the plague

Cran



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 06:41 PM
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reply to post by thePharaoh
 

Umm yes a volcano,
Vulcanism has the largest effect on human populations of any
natural force, other than climate. But many major climate fluctuations can be attributed to vulcanism.
The 1815 eruption of tambora significantly affected world wide weather and ultimately caused the deaths of millions of people worldwide.
From the wiki on tambora,


The eruption caused global climate anomalies that included the phenomenon known as "volcanic winter": 1816 became known as the "Year Withouta Summer" because of the effecton North American and European weather. Agricultural crops failed and livestock died in much of the Northern Hemisphere, resulting in the worst famine of the 19th century. [6]

And

This pattern of climate anomaly has been blamed for the severity of typhus epidemic in southeast Europe and the eastern

Mediterranean between 1816 and 1819. [6] The climate changes disrupted Indian monsoons causing three failed harvests and famine contributing to worldwide spread of a new strain of

cholera originating in Bengal in 1816. [30] Much livestockdied in New England during the winter of 1816–1817. Cool temperatures and heavy rains resulted in failed harvests in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. Families in Wales travelled long distances as refugees, begging for food. Famine was prevalent in north and southwest Ireland, following the failure of wheat, oat and potato harvests. The crisis was severe in Germany, where food prices rose sharply. Due to the unknown cause of the problems, demonstrations infrontof grain markets and bakeries, followed by riots, arson and looting, took place in many European cities. It was the worst famine of the 19th century. [



en.m.wikipedia.org...



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 05:04 PM
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Originally posted by cranspace
Lets not sidetrack the post with an argument over the source of information
A quick google search brings up plenty of other sources
That are relevent to both parts of the post

Cran


I apologize and I am guilty as charged.
Regards, Iwinder



posted on Aug, 9 2012 @ 05:34 PM
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Originally posted by cranspace
reply to post by tazdeill2
 


I refer you to this video



Originally posted by studio500




Which states this happened 100 years before the plague

Cran

I
Actually the plague shows up in Europe for the first time in 541 as the plague of justinian.
It reoccured every generation or so until the 700s. And the arthurian legends chronicle that plagues effect on the British population of the the British isles. The plague decimated British populations while sparing the. Anglo/ Saxon peoples. The British had extensive contacts and trade with the Roman empire and the the plague arrived on Roman ships, while the angles and saxons did not trade with the Romans and were spared. The British population was so devastated by the disease that much of the Saxon conquest was just moving into empty British villiages.



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 09:11 AM
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reply to post by cranspace
 


Cataclysmic volcano wreaked havoc on medieval Britain
www.museumoflondonarchaeology.org.uk...


The effects of this massive eruption were felt across the globe, as a ‘dry fog’³ descended across the world, cooling the Earth’s surface.
Don Walker, MOLA Osteologist, said: “This is the first archaeological evidence for the 1258 volcano and is an excellent example of the complexity of knowledge that can be gained from archaeological evidence. It is amazing to think that such a massive global natural disaster has been identified in a small area of East London. MOLA work on such a wide range of projects but I am always surprised when incredible discoveries like this one come to light.”

Conclusive evidence for a Volcanic eruption and the Spitalfields site

Cran



posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 09:50 AM
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This looks like ONE BILLION YEARS TO EARTH to me. Better duck guvna the locust will be storming soon.






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