Take your prostate exams ....... (Ration Time!!!)

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posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 01:25 PM
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reply to post by kingkra
 
And it's a government "task force" that is making these decisions.




posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by kingkra
 


The numbers of people getting cancer has increased a lot but the numbers of people dying from it hasn't gone up that much. I am having a hard time getting the numbers of those being treated and the old numbers through the last fifty years. In order for medicine to have this much of a success rate I surmised they generally knew what was causing the increase. Cancer needs treatment once it gets bad, I do not contest that at all and their treatments work. I am looking for different things that cause our body not to identify it or destroy it when it's small. There are some people that know the answer to this better than I do but they either are being ignored or don't desire to tell others because they are afraid of being targeted by those in the medical/pharmaceutical industry. This problem in our foods does not appear to be a conspiracy, it is caused by precautions by the industry. Fix one problem and start another.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


Get back in my cage????




posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 03:48 PM
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Originally posted by beezzer

Originally posted by hp1229

Originally posted by beezzer

Originally posted by drbatstein
reply to post by beezzer
 
The scanning is causing cancer most likely, like with the breast scans

I "used" to get PSA tests every year.
edit on 31-7-2012 by beezzer because: (no reason given)

Well..now many will substitute the PSA with TSA for the same test
One way or the other few will get the test free of cost

Not unless they buy me dinner first!
And if they did buy dinner before the test, with the way the economy is going and forced medical coverage expense, I wouldn't be surprised if people line up for a TSA test even if they didnt have any symptoms



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 04:28 PM
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The creator of the PSA test said that he never intended for it to be used as a diagnostic. The problem then comes that there are an excess amount of false positives. You don't want to go down that cure trail unless you are sure.

www.theage.com.au...


THE creator of the blood test used to detect prostate cancer has admitted it has become a ''hugely expensive public health disaster'' and should be abandoned. Richard Ablin, who developed the prostate-specific antigen test 40 years ago, used by about 1 million Australians a year, yesterday agreed it had been proven inaccurate and was ''hardly more effective than a coin toss''. ''PSA testing can't detect prostate cancer, and more important, it can't distinguish between the two types of prostate cancer - the one that will kill you and the one that won't,'' Dr Ablin wrote in a column in the The New York Times. Read more: www.theage.com.au...
edit on 31-7-2012 by spyder550 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 04:35 PM
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reply to post by spyder550
 


It saved my fathers life.

So I can't really debate the merits without placing emotions into the mix.

Sorry about people getting false positives. Yay for the lives that it has saved.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by beezzer
 


I have no *proof*, but only personal experience information to share, conveyed to me by my sister.

She works for a hospital system corporation that covers many states from Florida to Texas, and everywhere in between. Also, northwards to Pennsylvania.

My sister is in a Director/Management position and here is what pressures she is facing within the past 3 months or so:

1. MDs are resigning or threatening to do so
2. MDs are NOT making referrals within the last 3 months (where they did before) for all kinds of laboratory work, tests, and the like to the hospitals
3. The root cause (determined by corporate) is determined to be to new/pending government laws

I am not trying to get off-topic here but simply provide a realistic "big picture" that relates to the testing you are talking about.

This stinks! I'm drawing the conclusion that you are talking about the U.S., of course.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 04:39 PM
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Originally posted by watchesfromwall
reply to post by beezzer
 


I have no *proof*, but only personal experience information to share, conveyed to me by my sister.

She works for a hospital system corporation that covers many states from Florida to Texas, and everywhere in between. Also, northwards to Pennsylvania.

My sister is in a Director/Management position and here is what pressures she is facing within the past 3 months or so:

1. MDs are resigning or threatening to do so
2. MDs are NOT making referrals within the last 3 months (where they did before) for all kinds of laboratory work, tests, and the like to the hospitals
3. The root cause (determined by corporate) is determined to be to new/pending government laws

I am not trying to get off-topic here but simply provide a realistic "big picture" that relates to the testing you are talking about.

This stinks! I'm drawing the conclusion that you are talking about the U.S., of course.



Yes, and thank you for your insight. There is a bigger picture here. One that i being hidden by announcements such as the one I posted.




posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 04:53 PM
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The problem is a PSA test reading can fluctuate for several reasons; foods, drugs, vitamins, herbs and give a higher reading.
When a man goes to his Dr. for a yearly check-up, there is also the rectal exam.
The normal size of the prostate is the size of a walnut.
Any inlargement or texture change is what the Dr. is looking for.
These two tests go hand in hand and a high PSA and inlargement of the prostate will lead to a biopsy.
The new tool Dr.s have is a 3 in1 tool. It will record the ultra sound, inject a pain killer into the prostate , and take the samples..
The other option is to get a complete mapping of the prostate, samples from the entire surface of the prostate.
The biopsy is done in the Dr.s office and the amount of samples vary from 6 to 18 samples.and your awake.
The mapping is done at the hospital and your knocked out , the number of samples varies from 25 to over a hundred depending on the size of the prostate.
I've had both 2 months apart , my regular biopsy found 4 bad cores out of 16 which gave me a 3x3 and agleason score of 6.
With my mapping they found 6 bad cores out of 36 which gave me a 3x4 and a gleason score of 7.
The 2 extra bad cores were on each side of my colon.
Most men do not die from prostate cancer the cancer spreads to other places and thats what kills them.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 07:38 PM
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I just happened to be talking to my brother who is currently undergoing treatment for prostate cancer. I mentioned this article and he asked just who are these people.

I don't believe they are government affiliated.

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U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

The USPSTF is an independent panel of non-Federal experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine and is composed of primary care providers (such as internists, pediatricians, family physicians, gynecologists/obstetricians, nurses, and health behavior specialists).

The USPSTF conducts scientific evidence reviews of a broad range of clinical preventive health care services (such as screening, counseling, and preventive medications) and develops recommendations for primary care clinicians and health systems. These recommendations are published in the form of "Recommendation Statements."

AHRQ's Prevention and Care Management Portfolio provides ongoing administrative, research, technical, and dissemination support to the USPSTF.


Not that it really makes any difference about their recommendations. I still think they're crazy. Just saying.

BTW, my brother is doing fine.
edit on 31-7-2012 by N3k9Ni because: forgot the link



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 08:02 PM
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I was taking medication for an enlarged prostate and it was really enlarged. The Flomax helped a litle but was giving me more complications. When I quit my epilepsy drugs the prostate slowly returned back to normal and I quit the flomax without even telling the doctor. Many drugs and foods themselves slow the metabolism and slow liver function. The liver protects itself and stops detoxing the rest of the body because of the lowering of it's ability to work properly. This caused the kidneys and prostate to be effected by the toxins and started their destruction. It took me a while to research how to help repair them and to identify foods and chemicals that were causing the problem. It'll take another couple more years to figure out things so I can help others because there are thousands of variables in diets and symptoms of diseases. Meanwhile I test on myself like an alchemist does to try to figure out things. It sucks but I am not jeopardizing anyone elses health.

People think they haven't any allergies to foods but they are mistaken. They have just been eating the antidote or companion food. The food is being modified and soils are getting depleated and the antidote isn't there anymore. Well, I guess we can't live forever.
edit on 31-7-2012 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 10:10 PM
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yeah, setting up Obama care
the bottom of the page wiki

Screening for prostate cancer is controversial because of cost and uncertain long-term benefits to patients.[1][17] Testing may lead to overdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment. Follow-up tests can include painful biopsies which can result in excessive bleeding and infection. The discoverer of PSA, Dr. Richard J. Ablin, concludes that the test's popularity "has led to a hugely expensive public health disaster," as only 16 percent of men will ever receive a diagnosis of prostate cancer, but only a 3 percent chance of dying from it. He states that "the test is hardly more effective than a coin toss."[18] Dr. Horan echos that sentiment in his book
edit on 31-7-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)

I wonder which of the 100% get to choose to be the 16% that get cancer...I mean do I get to skip the test and pass the cancer to the other guy? I see a clear lack of critical thinking on the governments behalf. But they don't see it that way now do they
how about keep screening 100% to find the 16% who may limit their chances of being the 3%
edit on 31-7-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 11:00 PM
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Originally posted by N3k9Ni
I just happened to be talking to my brother who is currently undergoing treatment for prostate cancer. I mentioned this article and he asked just who are these people.

I don't believe they are government affiliated.

link

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

The USPSTF is an independent panel of non-Federal experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine and is composed of primary care providers (such as internists, pediatricians, family physicians, gynecologists/obstetricians, nurses, and health behavior specialists).

The USPSTF conducts scientific evidence reviews of a broad range of clinical preventive health care services (such as screening, counseling, and preventive medications) and develops recommendations for primary care clinicians and health systems. These recommendations are published in the form of "Recommendation Statements."

AHRQ's Prevention and Care Management Portfolio provides ongoing administrative, research, technical, and dissemination support to the USPSTF.


Not that it really makes any difference about their recommendations. I still think they're crazy. Just saying.

BTW, my brother is doing fine.
edit on 31-7-2012 by N3k9Ni because: forgot the link


Thank you for that. If indeed, this is an independent study, then I will issue an apology.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 11:11 PM
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H.R. 5998: USPSTF Transparency and Accountability Act of 2012

www.govtrack.us...

I need to read more, but to my best ability (so far) it sure looks like the USPSTF is a government agency.

Any other input is welcome.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 

A colonoscopy has nothing to do with screening or diagnosis of prostate cancer. Its purpose is early detection of the precursors to colorectal cancer and it, in contrast with PSA testing (a blood test), has been shown to be very effective in reducing the incidence of cancer.


In the study, researchers compared colon cancer rates among 1,688 patients with colon cancer to 1,932 healthy control participants. After adjusting for factors that could influence colon cancer, such as medical history and preventive behaviors such as use of anti-inflammatory drugs, the scientists found that volunteers who have had a colonoscopy in the 10 years preceding the study lowered their risk of colon or rectal cancer by 77%.
healthland.time.com...
edit on 7/31/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 11:34 PM
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reply to post by beezzer
 


You're right. I guess I didn't look deep enough. AHRQ is, indeed, a government agency.

Wikipedia - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) (formerly known as the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research) is one of 12 agencies within the United States Department of Health and Human Services.[1] AHRQ's mission is to improve the quality, safety, efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare for Americans. Led by Director Carolyn M. Clancy, M.D., AHRQ sponsors, conducts, and disseminates research to help people make more informed decisions and improve the quality of health care services.


www.ahrq.gov



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 11:41 PM
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reply to post by N3k9Ni
 
I think (bottom line) is that the information needs to get out and we treat people without influence by outside agencies regardless of their affiliation.

Cheers to you good sir for posting that, and I hope your brother continues to do well.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 11:48 PM
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"Rationing health care"?

PUH-LEEZE.

This doctor was writing his medical opinion on the health benefit (or risk) or a prostrate exam. Did you read "How Did the USPSTF Arrive at This Recommendation?"

There's nothing about this that will "ration health care". You can take his advice/opinion and go to your doctor and do what you want with it.

Regarding the whole "rationing health care" FUD campaign: Health care is like any other product. With increased demand comes increased supply. Hospitals and the medical profession will happily expand to meet demand. The logic behind this post is all about FUD.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 11:49 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 

He's talking about the PSA test which is not a prostate exam. It is a blood test.
edit on 7/31/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 11:59 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Even so, how does this equate to "rationing health care"? This doctor was offering his opinion on the benefits/risks of said test. Not saying it should "rationed".





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