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Can Our Moon Have Auroras?

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posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 12:52 AM
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I was out looking at tonight's Thunder Moon and I swear I could see bluish-green aurora at the top & bottom of the moon. I'm aware the moon may have a weak magnetic field if any at all...

Just wondering if the moon can get auroras or were my eyes just playing tricks on me? Maybe someone can step outside right now and confirm my observation.

I did Google it but came up with nothing on moon auroras.
edit on 7/4/12 by Evildead because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 01:02 AM
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NASA has, or used to keep records of something known as Transient Lunar phenomenon . There are far more technical ways to describe the interactions of light and dust, but the easy way is to say that strange looking lights can be seen bouncing around the moon. They dont have any particular patern to them per se, but accounts Ive read through sound pretty spectacular in several instances.

There was also an M class flare recently, so that may have some effect on what you saw.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 01:10 AM
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Originally posted by W3RLIED2
NASA has, or used to keep records of something known as Transient Lunar phenomenon.

There was also an M class flare recently, so that may have some effect on what you saw.


Thanks for the info.

I knew of the recent flares and CMEs. I was thinking that might be related to it, IF I was actually seeing the bluish auroras I think I saw.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 01:10 AM
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Heres a NASA .pdf reporting PROJECT MOON BLINK .

Cool stuff, enjoy!



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 01:57 AM
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Remove your sunglasses and mask and have another look at the moon and tell me if you still see it?

W3RLIED2 is correct, I can add nothing more than a smart-A comment.

Enjoy your moon.

Mickierocksman



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 09:29 AM
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Everything with an electromagnetic field has an aura. But I read that there are magnetic fields on the moon, but as a whole the moon lacks an electromagnetic field like earth has. And planets don't release any rays, they reflect them from other stars. The rays are actually electromagnetic waves. So all planets have an aura of sorts, but not like a human or an animal would.

Oops! I misread aurora as aura. My bad.
edit on 4-7-2012 by RightInTwo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 11:53 PM
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S&F because I've never really thought about that before!

Great question!



posted on Jul, 5 2012 @ 12:03 AM
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The aurora (australis and borealis) are caused by energetic particles from the Sun being guided to the magnetic poles by the Earth's magnetic field. Since the magnetic lines of force at the poles are vertical the particles are forced downward. When those high energy particles encounter the atoms of the upper atmosphere they give up their energy in the form of light.

Two problems with aurora on the Moon. No magnetic field. No atmosphere.

It's likely that what you saw has something to do with our own atmosphere distorting the moonlight.
edit on 7/5/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 5 2012 @ 03:32 AM
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Originally posted by Phage

Two problems with aurora on the Moon. No magnetic field. No atmosphere.

It's likely that what you saw has something to do with our own atmosphere distorting the moonlight.
edit on 7/5/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)


I was thinking it could be something with our atmosphere and the brightness of the moon that night.

However, I've read that the moon DOES have a magnetic field although its a very weak one.


The external magnetic field of the Moon is very weak in comparison to that of the Earth. Other major differences are that the Moon does not currently have a dipolar magnetic field (as would be generated by a geodynamo in its core) and the varying magnetization that is present is almost entirely crustal in origin. One hypothesis holds that the crustal magnetizations were acquired early in lunar history when a geodynamo was still operating. The small size of the lunar core, however, is a potential obstacle to promoting that hypothesis to the status of theory. Alternatively, it is possible that on an airless body such as the Moon, transient magnetic fields could be generated during large impact events. Ref. Link



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