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1969 fireball meteorite reveals new ancient mineral

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posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 07:15 PM
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A fireball that tears across the sky is not just a one-time skywatching event — it can reap scientific dividends long afterward. In fact, one that lit up Mexico's skies in 1969 scattered thousands of meteorite bits across the northern Mexico state of Chihuahua. And now, decades later, that meteorite, named Allende, has divulged a new mineral called panguite.

Panguite is believed to be among the oldest minerals in the solar system, which is about 4.5 billion years old. Panguite belongs to a class of refractory minerals that could have formed only under the extreme temperatures and conditions present in the infant solar system.


more at:
www.msnbc.msn.com...-pPc_XLmuQ




posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 07:17 PM
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Article goes on to say that it's a titanium dioxide mineral and also a material previously unknown to science.

Something new every day.



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 07:17 PM
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Thank you for the info.

I have been noticing alot of shooting stars lately when I go out and smoke at night.

I saw one last night.

4.5 billion years old is pretty old


SnF
edit on 26-6-2012 by liejunkie01 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 07:58 PM
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That is very interesting. There are plenty of gaps in the periodic table to fill. I wonder where this will fit in?



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 09:18 PM
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Originally posted by onecraftydude
That is very interesting. There are plenty of gaps in the periodic table to fill. I wonder where this will fit in?


Don’t know but here’s the paper from the
42nd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (2011)
www.lpi.usra.edu...

I thought this was something new, but the paper was done last year.



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 09:31 PM
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reply to post by Pauligirl
 


Wonderful and interesting story! it makes one think of all the possible unknown things fall to earth, and may be that some of our life forms are even from space.

I remember an article that talked about Fungus and its many oddities and the scientist suggested it may have come down in a shower from space!



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 11:30 PM
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Originally posted by onecraftydude
That is very interesting. There are plenty of gaps in the periodic table to fill. I wonder where this will fit in?


What gaps do we have in the periodic table? Also this is a mineral, not an element. It is made of known elements, and thus will fill no holes, which we dont really have any holes to fill in anyway.
edit on 26-6-2012 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 27 2012 @ 12:25 AM
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Originally posted by Pauligirl
Article goes on to say that it's a titanium dioxide mineral and also a material previously unknown to science.

Something new every day.


titanium dioxide has been around for quite some time, the mineral Panguite is a derivative of it. There were papers published concerning the photocatalistic nature of titanium dioxide back in 1972, but it was well known way before that.
It's not that Panguite is "unknown" to science, it just hadn't been investigated before, or they wouldn't have been able to determine that it is a titanium dioxide derivative. The news story doesn't clarify between the two.



posted on Jun, 27 2012 @ 12:29 AM
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Originally posted by onecraftydude
That is very interesting. There are plenty of gaps in the periodic table to fill. I wonder where this will fit in?


It's a mineral, not an element. Minerals are combinations of elements. There are no gaps in the periodic table, although the elements representative of the "end" of the table are not stable in natural form and cannot occur in nature, they are products of labs or reactions in stars (nuclear reactions)



posted on Jun, 27 2012 @ 12:30 AM
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Originally posted by OccamsRazor04

Originally posted by onecraftydude
That is very interesting. There are plenty of gaps in the periodic table to fill. I wonder where this will fit in?


What gaps do we have in the periodic table? Also this is a mineral, not an element. It is made of known elements, and thus will fill no holes, which we dont really have any holes to fill in anyway.
edit on 26-6-2012 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)


Didn't see your post... but said essentially the same thing. Thanks for also pointing it out!



posted on Jun, 27 2012 @ 12:36 AM
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reply to post by PurpleChiten
 


I always enjoy seeing your posts, even though we have some differing opinions I always respect your thought out approaches
I have no doubt it will be me next time not seeing your post and saying the same as you in the near future.



posted on Jun, 27 2012 @ 12:38 AM
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Originally posted by OccamsRazor04
reply to post by PurpleChiten
 


I always enjoy seeing your posts, even though we have some differing opinions I always respect your thought out approaches
I have no doubt it will be me next time not seeing your post and saying the same as you in the near future.


It's always good that there are several willing to correct the mistakes made in other's misunderstanding of science!



posted on Jun, 27 2012 @ 12:42 AM
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reply to post by PurpleChiten
 


Without berating them and attempting to make them feel stupid for a simple misunderstanding! Well you have a wonderful night my friend.



posted on Jun, 27 2012 @ 12:43 AM
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Originally posted by OccamsRazor04
reply to post by PurpleChiten
 


Without berating them and attempting to make them feel stupid for a simple misunderstanding! Well you have a wonderful night my friend.


Exactly! And that is the key part!
Good evening to you as well!



posted on Jun, 27 2012 @ 11:57 AM
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reply to post by Pauligirl
 


wow this is the coolest rock ever.

what if the movie wolverine is based off of it? adamantium?

i found another picture of it here:

images.wikia.com...

( my same comment from the identical thread )


peace.



posted on Jun, 27 2012 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by SoymilkAlaska
 


The crystalline structure is very interesting too. It's basically inert and could be very safe for us on a biological level leading to some great inventions and processes!



posted on Jun, 27 2012 @ 12:17 PM
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Originally posted by PurpleChiten
reply to post by SoymilkAlaska
 


The crystalline structure is very interesting too. It's basically inert and could be very safe for us on a biological level leading to some great inventions and processes!



hmm interesting!


as long as they don't force anyone to put something in their body that they don't want.



peace.




btw, i saw the synthesis ending of mass 3 (that video game)


VERY interesting.



posted on Jun, 27 2012 @ 10:34 PM
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reply to post by SoymilkAlaska
 


All the endings were near identical, it's a shame. Greater diversity would have been better.





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