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Australian scientists says lab liquid shot to the heart could save dying soldiers

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posted on May, 11 2012 @ 08:27 PM
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Australian scientists says lab liquid shot to the heart could save dying soldiers


www.news.com.au

WOUNDED soldiers or injured civilians in remote locations could benefit in the future from an injection that stabilises the heart following massive blood loss.
The fluid is being developed and tested by Queensland scientist Professor Geoffrey Dobson, whose research has been inspired by the ability of animals like the hummingbird to slow their heart rate during hibernation.

The fluid makes a heart weakened by blood loss beat more strongly to continue delivering blood to the body's vital organs
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on May, 11 2012 @ 08:27 PM
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This is awesome! Hopefully the human trials work successfully and it can be issued to soldiers within a short period of time! Furthermore, this will also be issued to civilians in remote locations, which i feel is a good idea. What does ATS think about this newly conducted research / liquid substance?

www.news.com.au
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on May, 11 2012 @ 08:38 PM
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I like it a lot.

But, why just soldiers? Car accidents, ER emergencies, etc. Perhaps they just needed the best example.

Thanks OP!
edit on 11-5-2012 by capone1 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 11 2012 @ 08:41 PM
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Also, if there's any science people, how would this be different than a shot of addrenaline?
Is it hecause this is shot directly into the heart?



posted on May, 11 2012 @ 08:48 PM
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Originally posted by capone1
I like it a lot.

But, why just soldiers?


Government grant funding for research. They all do it. No matter how big or small. Even the banks receive government grants for research. I



posted on May, 11 2012 @ 08:57 PM
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Not enough info in this article to explain exactly how this "shot" helps survival. How does it correlate with a hummingbird's ability to slow its heartrate down? Does this cause its heart to beat more strongly, if slowly?



posted on May, 11 2012 @ 08:58 PM
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reply to post by capone1
 


From the article:


"The wider implications are for military and pre-hospital civilian use, in rural and remote areas, where nothing currently exists," Prof Dobson said.


As a paramedic..I love fowling this kind of news..thanks OP.

I do wish that more studies and research could be made in the civilian world; there is no lack of trauma in the US; you don't need a war to find it. However EMS is so compartmentalized it makes large scale studies very difficult. It has been slowly improving over the years tho.






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