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BitCoin Virus spreading around ATS?. Be careful with political talking points.

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posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:22 PM
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Originally posted by Majic
reply to post by jjf3rd77
 

That's not very conclusive, and absent substantial evidence, appears to rely on the idea that correlation proves causation.

As an example of why that's problematic, if the phone rings while I post to ATS, I could assume posting to ATS causes the phone to ring.

Is there any evidence you can offer, other than assumptions, that would show a connection between ATS and CoinMiner?



Originally posted by jjf3rd77
Yes you can send a virus that way through a hidden links and various other ways... I have seen it and done it!

Hold on, here. Are you saying you've deliberately planted viruses on others' computers?


I can't that's why I am asking the question. And no not to other's computers. I have done it in a network security lab a course I took at school!




posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by jjf3rd77
 


Well, I am sorry you have been treated badly here, I hope your mistaken and its not someone targeting you for political beliefs. I would hope if this did happen to other people they would speak out about it so that it can be handled.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by DrMattMaddix
 


LOL the only thing in your post I understoood was IP



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by jenlovesturtles
 


of course but it's far better to claim that someone or some group is lurking around ATS sending bitcoin mining viruses ( I just love saying it) to conservatives than to admit that, perhaps, you picked up the virus while surfing for porn or downloading some movie or other on a bittorrent site.


reply to post by jiggerj
 


no, you spend far too much time with excavating nasal nuggets whilst surfing our fine site.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:29 PM
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You're treading on thin ice making such an inflammatory accusation based on pure coincidence. If you love coming to this site so much you should learn to not accuse the people who can very easily take away your access. I'm guessing the staff here are incredibly tolerant considering you aren't banned yet for making such false accusations.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by jjf3rd77
I can't that's why I am asking the question. And no not to other's computers. I have done it in a network security lab a course I took at school!

Okay. So you've taken a security course, so I have to hope that one of the things they taught you about investigating compromised systems is gathering evidence or "tracks", if you will, that can be used to identify the means of infection.

I'm still not seeing anything like that here. Are there any posts with links to malicious sites in any of the threads you've been involved with?

Having just looked into how CoinMiner behaves, I'm also wondering how this is all we're hearing about it considering how dramatic its impact is. It's not something that could be missed, given its tendency to bring systems to a crawl.

Has any other member been attacked by CoinMiner?



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:30 PM
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I think you may want to look at what software you are using.


Spotify is a quick and easy-to-use way to listen to your favorite tracks or albums without downloading, purchasing or waiting for buffering. While this new system for listening to music satisfies the need for tunes instantly, it doesn't come without drawbacks.

The Spotify Virus
anti-virus-software-review.toptenreviews.com...
In early 2011, a hacker used Spotify's third-party advertisements to spread a virus to users' computer systems. The malware infected computers without users clicking the ad, with a technique called an anti-virus hoax that used what is referred to as a Blackhole Exploit Kit, which is a tool kit for exploiting weak spots in software.

While using Spotify, the malware installed a virus called Windows Recovery AntiVirus. This fake security software scam is intent on convincing computer users that their systems are infected with viruses and that they need to buy an upgraded version of Windows Recovery to fix the problem. Of course, the only thing the users' computers are infected with is the Windows Recovery virus. Often, hoax software like this not only tries to scam you out of money, but it can also slow your computer down and spread to other computers in your network.

Interestingly, only a few people were affected by this virus because most users' computer security software blocked the malware and destroyed it before it could become a problem. This shows how important it is to install security software and to keep it updated while using software like Spotify.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by Sauron
I think you may want to look at what software you are using.


Spotify is a quick and easy-to-use way to listen to your favorite tracks or albums without downloading, purchasing or waiting for buffering. While this new system for listening to music satisfies the need for tunes instantly, it doesn't come without drawbacks.

The Spotify Virus
anti-virus-software-review.toptenreviews.com...
In early 2011, a hacker used Spotify's third-party advertisements to spread a virus to users' computer systems. The malware infected computers without users clicking the ad, with a technique called an anti-virus hoax that used what is referred to as a Blackhole Exploit Kit, which is a tool kit for exploiting weak spots in software.

While using Spotify, the malware installed a virus called Windows Recovery AntiVirus. This fake security software scam is intent on convincing computer users that their systems are infected with viruses and that they need to buy an upgraded version of Windows Recovery to fix the problem. Of course, the only thing the users' computers are infected with is the Windows Recovery virus. Often, hoax software like this not only tries to scam you out of money, but it can also slow your computer down and spread to other computers in your network.

Interestingly, only a few people were affected by this virus because most users' computer security software blocked the malware and destroyed it before it could become a problem. This shows how important it is to install security software and to keep it updated while using software like Spotify.


thats not the same virus but very interesting however thanx



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by DrMattMaddix
 


Thank you, that's all you had to say.

If he was computer savvy, then he would have had the proper safeguards in place. This wouldn't have happened in the end..

The 'net is dirty, you have to have protection.. vast resources in the digital world.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:43 PM
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I'm just glad ATS is no longer redirecting us to HEAVY.COM

Thanks to whoever corrected that!




posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:52 PM
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Originally posted by cenpuppie
reply to post by DrMattMaddix
 



If he was computer savvy, then he would have had the proper safeguards in place. This wouldn't have happened in the end..


It's a new computer or did you miss that part? I am still getting all of my programs and things installed. While debating with people here. It makes the process go faster



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:53 PM
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I guess it is time for a little education here.

First off, you can make some really nice cash mining bit coins, I know I am a bit coin miner myself.

Miners are actually in the minority in terms of the bit coin currency exchange, most of the business is now done in accepting bit coins for goods and service. Exchanging the coins for other currency and speculative investing is also very large.

"Mining" is how transactions get done. Blocks are released which are really just (SHA256) encryption blocks with a sort of really difficult mathematical "puzzle" embedded. When a miner or pool solves the block, they get a 50 BTC reward along with the premium transaction fees associated with the transactions in the block. People offer up extra fractions of BTC to move their transactions faster, but the vast majority of transactions are done the free route (few minutes to a few days to become valid). Once a block is solved, it has to be verified 120 times separate from the now block owners account to become valid. Confirming a block is much easier than solving a block, so no puzzles or rewards for that.

Bit mining programs are not "virus" or Malware. In fact there is a small group of programers dedicated to making more efficient kernels for mining.A large chuck of them are open source, so you can see the coding for yourself.
Some of the most clever encryption hashing, NOT HACKING..LOL..solving encryption hashes legitimately, is coming out this community.

There is an art to running mining rigs and making a nice profit off it. It involves a delicate balance of power consumption vs hash rates and to a person into computers can be very fun and rewarding.

I am running short on time (I have class tonight myself, a systems design class) so I also want to leave you this.
I also have taken security classes and in fact this semester I am taking an ethical hacking course. I can almost guarantee the computers you used in your labs were not fully patched and as such vulnerable to attack. This is done purposely of course as a fully patched system is kind of a hard hack, putting aside social engineering of course. Even legit publicly available penetration testing software is normally a bit behind to give companies some time to patch systems before the exploit becomes completely publicly visible.

If anybody has any questions or is even up for discussion on BTC or even system security, i will check in after class. If there is enough interest maybe even start a thread on those subjects.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:57 PM
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Originally posted by Dreamwatcher
I guess it is time for a little education here.

First off, you can make some really nice cash mining bit coins, I know I am a bit coin miner myself.

Miners are actually in the minority in terms of the bit coin currency exchange, most of the business is now done in accepting bit coins for goods and service. Exchanging the coins for other currency and speculative investing is also very large.

"Mining" is how transactions get done. Blocks are released which are really just (SHA256) encryption blocks with a sort of really difficult mathematical "puzzle" embedded. When a miner or pool solves the block, they get a 50 BTC reward along with the premium transaction fees associated with the transactions in the block. People offer up extra fractions of BTC to move their transactions faster, but the vast majority of transactions are done the free route (few minutes to a few days to become valid). Once a block is solved, it has to be verified 120 times separate from the now block owners account to become valid. Confirming a block is much easier than solving a block, so no puzzles or rewards for that.

Bit mining programs are not "virus" or Malware. In fact there is a small group of programers dedicated to making more efficient kernels for mining.A large chuck of them are open source, so you can see the coding for yourself.
Some of the most clever encryption hashing, NOT HACKING..LOL..solving encryption hashes legitimately, is coming out this community.

There is an art to running mining rigs and making a nice profit off it. It involves a delicate balance of power consumption vs hash rates and to a person into computers can be very fun and rewarding.

I am running short on time (I have class tonight myself, a systems design class) so I also want to leave you this.
I also have taken security classes and in fact this semester I am taking an ethical hacking course. I can almost guarantee the computers you used in your labs were not fully patched and as such vulnerable to attack. This is done purposely of course as a fully patched system is kind of a hard hack, putting aside social engineering of course. Even legit publicly available penetration testing software is normally a bit behind to give companies some time to patch systems before the exploit becomes completely publicly visible.

If anybody has any questions or is even up for discussion on BTC or even system security, i will check in after class. If there is enough interest maybe even start a thread on those subjects.



Yes I know what bit coins are and I don't want or need them. I make good money anyway. The point is the program just appeared on my computer by itself. That's considered hacking in my book



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 07:27 PM
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Originally posted by jjf3rd77

Originally posted by DrMattMaddix
Send a virus directly to your IP?



Yes you can send a virus that way through a hidden links and various other ways... I have seen it and done it!


You work in the industry? explain a subnet mask in detail and why they use it. various other ways please do tell? what your trying to say is someone found your ip address and linked it to you out of the hundreds of people and ip address on here lol. Then they man in the middle attacked you and added a virus into a packet sent to you. or maybe you don't have a spam blocker and you clicked a link you shouldn't have lol



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by jjf3rd77
 


Wait, so, you have a computer that is only a few days old and suddenly you get this whatever-ware?

Did you bother to update service packs, and security patches before jumping onto chrome and spouting off in the political forum?

Is the wireless turned ON?

Do you even have a password for your Administrator level account or do you just turn on your computer where the desktop just pops up?

Are you internetting in a public place like a coffee shop and this computer is a laptop?



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 07:49 PM
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Truth be told. You likely got but a mere 'fake.fraud.alert' type malware, claiming all sorts of infections, and should have just downloaded and ran ComboFix

... within 20 minutes or less, you'd have likely been tickled pink.


w/ your system running better than Evahhh..


It beats MalwareBytes hands down with those type craptasticals, imo.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 07:58 PM
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So, how was it that 'someone' you were conversing with in a forum was able to put a virus on your computer? That doesnt even make sense. You would have to download something or stream something.

You, sir, sound less computer savvy than my 8 yer old.
edit on 7-5-2012 by stanguilles7 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 08:32 PM
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Forget about the Bitcoin Virus that targets people based on their political beliefs - don't you realise there's a loose ManBearPig roaming around the ATS forums?



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 08:59 PM
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I actually read through this whole thread before responding. Chuckling the whole time, nodding in agreement with the Admins that piped in.

Feel free to close this nonsense thread.

The OP is the only one with this problem. Nobody else has reported a problem. Believe me, ATS members can SQUAWK LOUDLY. No other problems. Hmmm....first strike.

Posting in ANY forum on ATS is an interaction of PHP and SQL. It runs on a series of servers (uhm, I'll check what I know, *blush*), and the ONLY time there is interaction beyond an HTML process is when you execute the ATS UPLOADS tab. Again, this is a one-way transaction. I have never downloaded anything from ATS, and neither has anyone else. (Err, maybe the video content, but that is beside the point.) Nobody has EVER had a popup window of any sort that ever says "you must download this content (virus payload) to continue enjoying ATS". ATS doesn't require a download of anything to use, so to claim you got it from ATS is your second strike.

The third strike is trying to make a connection between BitCoin, ATS, and a particular Forum on ATS. I must ask, why not make your OP about Aliens and BitCoin? Maybe WWW3, where we pay for ammo in BitCoins? Sorry for the sarcasm.

There is no BitCoin virus on ATS. Period. BitCoin is an executable, not a virus. It ONLY installs if you click the "okay", "install", or "yes" buttons.

Anyway, is being careful talking about politics on ATS considered saying, "I support RON PAUL!"? Will I get a virus talking about any political candidate? Nope.

To prevent absurdity, you must deny ignorance.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 09:11 PM
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The fact that you're assuming it's because of your political beliefs only goes to show how ingrained partisan thinking is in your mind. This could happen to anyone and I seriously doubt it has anything to do with what you've posted on the site.



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