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Former TSA chief thinks they are doing it all wrong and should allow weapons on planes.

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posted on Apr, 17 2012 @ 11:48 AM
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He thinks that the current procedures lead to an "Easter egg hunt mentality" that causes them to look for common items on a list of banned stuff that could cause them to overlook something else that could be really dangerous.

He points out a training exercise in which a lighter and a bomb are placed in a bag for agents to inspect. Most all find the lighter but, overlook the bomb sitting right next to it.


Former TSA Chief: Allow Weapons on Planes


In order to streamline the security process, reduce the possibility of a future attack, and keep customers happier, Hawley offers five unconventional suggestions for improvement:

1. No more banned items: Aside from obvious weapons capable of fast, multiple killings—such as guns, toxins and explosive devices—it is time to end the TSA's use of well-trained security officers as kindergarten teachers to millions of passengers a day. The list of banned items has created an "Easter-egg hunt" mentality at the TSA. Worse, banning certain items gives terrorists a complete list of what not to use in their next attack. Lighters are banned? The next attack will use an electric trigger.

2. Allow all liquids: Simple checkpoint signage, a small software update and some traffic management are all that stand between you and bringing all your liquids on every U.S. flight. Really.

3. Give TSA officers more flexibility and rewards for initiative, and hold them accountable: No security agency on earth has the experience and pattern-recognition skills of TSA officers. We need to leverage that ability. TSA officers should have more discretion to interact with passengers and to work in looser teams throughout airports. And TSA's leaders must be prepared to support initiative even when officers make mistakes. Currently, independence on the ground is more likely to lead to discipline than reward.

4. Eliminate baggage fees: Much of the pain at TSA checkpoints these days can be attributed to passengers overstuffing their carry-on luggage to avoid baggage fees. The airlines had their reasons for implementing these fees, but the result has been a checkpoint nightmare. Airlines might increase ticket prices slightly to compensate for the lost revenue, but the main impact would be that checkpoint screening for everybody will be faster and safer.

5. Randomize security: Predictability is deadly. Banned-item lists, rigid protocols—if terrorists know what to expect at the airport, they have a greater chance of evading our system.

Townhall.com

He says that a 9-11 type of scenario is unlikely to happen again because travelers would fight back and cockpit doors are reinforced. He thinks the TSA should focus on managing risk instead of enforcing bureaucratic regulations.





edit on 4/17/12 by FortAnthem because:
_____________ extra DIV




posted on Apr, 17 2012 @ 11:58 AM
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How did you get that title from the article? Did you even read the first suggestion saying that guns, toxins, and explosives should still be banned?

p.s. I'm actually more in agreement with the title, than the article, though. An armed society is a polite society,
edit on 4/17/12 by AnonymousCitizen because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 17 2012 @ 11:59 AM
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yep. They better do something now that the world knows they can smuggle anything past the scanners. Go back to metal detectors. Use the explosives pads and machine. Instead of TSA $12 an hour fake security guards the need to put Dogs under the tables in cages and have people watch them on camera. The TSA is the best fake security you can hire for $12 buck an hr.

But the dogs will work nonstop at a much higher degree of accuracy just to please their handles.

Its time to get a grip and set up real security.



posted on Apr, 17 2012 @ 12:01 PM
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reply to post by AnonymousCitizen
 


He says that those are the only items that should be banned. If someone wanted to carry their pocket knife on the plane, that would be OK under his plan.

Only weapons capable of fast, multiple killing should be banned in his opinion.



posted on Apr, 17 2012 @ 12:02 PM
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I read this a few days ago. People should listen to this guy, but they won't. They won't because TSA is not there to ensure passenger safety. It is part of the oppressive police state that is being implemented, as we all know.

Interesting about the lighter and bomb. My uncle used the same technique years ago when he'd go to Canada with his motorhome. He had a cheap old .22 rifle he kept under the bed for protection since he stayed in state parks where there was a lot of wildlife. Anyway, he'd stock up on tons of booze while he was in Canada. He'd spend 6 or 800 dollars easy, and of course that was way more than what was allowed back into the US without paying taxes. So when the customs guy would ask him if he had anything to declare, he'd feign innocence and say "I have a gun" which would cause the agents to have a cow and board his coach to inspect the gun. Their attention was so focused on the gun, which was legal at the time, even in Canada, that they'd completely miss the huge quantity of booze hidden right in front of them. Worked every time.



posted on Apr, 17 2012 @ 12:03 PM
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Originally posted by AnonymousCitizen
How did you get that title from the article? Did you even read the first suggestion saying that guns, toxins, and explosives should still be banned?

p.s. I'm actually more in agreement with the title, than the article, though. An armed society is a polite society,
edit on 4/17/12 by AnonymousCitizen because: (no reason given)
Agreed. Issue frangible ammunition, added to ticket cost unless customer provides their own, and allow everyone to be armed. That would be the end of all hijackings.




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