What Gravity IS. A new theory.

page: 2
4
<< 1   >>

log in

join

posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 05:55 PM
link   

Originally posted by litterbaux
reply to post by smithjustinb
 


What an interesting idea. Here is how my brain pictures this scenario if true.

In a dimension that we cannot see there are "things" that affect how matter orientates itself in our 4 dimensions. The bigger the force is "behind the scenes" the bigger impact it has on our dimensions. For example, Earth, why did those first two atom's decide to hang out? Sure maybe it was swirling matter and gasses but if your theory holds true its not just randomness that brings planets together, its a background force. Like your sun example, for atoms to be pulled so hard that they create a fusion reactor in a complete void? Logic tells me these things don't just happen. Something is there doing it. Why don't all matter clouds form into suns? Why don't all matter clouds form into planets?

This theory explains all of that. Thanks for the read and getting my mind spinning


Quantum theory came along with an explanation how matter and sub atomic particles orientate themselves in 3D.

It would not be illogical that there is a principle in the 4th dimension that orientates the third dimension. If we assume that the fourth dimension is time then why is it our perception that time always moves in just one dimension?

Is that because of a rule or because of our limited perception?

I have heard of experiments in which atoms when slowed right down can be transmitted and replicated elsewhere (like as in beam me up Scotty) so perhaps a study of the effect on gravity during such a process may turn up some interesting relationships which could then be interpreted as a rule?




posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 01:19 PM
link   
reply to post by smithjustinb
 


I am eventually going to start a thread of my own on the entirety of my theory, but this aspect may be interesting to you: have you ever thought of suns (stars) as being the "other side" of black holes? There seems to be a black hole in middle of each galaxy which seems to "suck up" matter in to an abyss of mystery, and (perhaps appropriately) that is where our knowledge stops


but instead of just focusing on matter (one of the worst of human habits..) think about how a black hole would also be absorbing the transmission (or "sight") of every star in the universe from that vantage point.. almost like the "eye of the galaxy" it beholds the universe from it's particular point of view, and processes that information "internally" from its perspective, and "externally" from our perspective (all light, matter, information being absorbed, being redistributed throughout the cosmos in the form of light, matter, and information)

does that make sense?



posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 02:01 PM
link   
I thought gravity was not a force ....

but a natural by-product of space curvature created by matter.





new topics
 
4
<< 1   >>

log in

join