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Ancient Indian religous artifact bears striking resemblence to a representation of a black hole.

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posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 08:36 PM
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I first happened upon this number of years ago while at the Smithsonian in Washington, it was part of an exhibit of Tibetan artifacts A strange object at the end of a staff. I thought the shape was very unusual as it didn't seem to resemble anything I had ever seen. I researched it and after a while, identified it as a Vajra, which means "diamond thunderbolt" The essence of diamond, which is indestructible, and the thunderbolt, which is irresistible force. In Buddhism it is a symbol of "ultimate reality" sometimes also "emptiness" In the Rigveda, it is mentioned as the chief weapon of the God Indri, used to kill the ignorant and sinners, and was given to him by Tvastar, the Creator of the Universe. So in essence it is a symbol of an indestructible irresistible force. Here is a picture of the object



I was studying Buddhist philosophy on and off at the time. I am also a long time Amateur astronomer and very interested in cosmology. Looking at the object, it seemed familiar to me. Then one day looking through some images from the Hubble space telescope, I came upon this picture of Centaurus A also known as NGC 5128 a galaxy known to contain a massive black hole at its center.:




The basic structure is intriguing as it is a black hole at the center of this galaxy with two lobed shaped jets on either end of the polar axis. I cannot help but think there is a similarity to this with the Vajra. But what really is interesting, is when you link what the Vajra symbolizes, namely an indestructible irresistible force, that's a pretty good description of what a black hole is. To ancient people the best analogy of something indestructible would be the diamond. And the most powerful cosmic force in ancient times would have to be the thunderbolt. Not only black holes can have lobes like this, the Eta Carina nebula is another good example:



Eta Carina is thought to be in the precursor stages of a massive explosion, which will result in the 100 solar mass star becoming a black hole. So again, something that structurally resembles the Vajra if you imagine a sun with two lobes on either side.

Looking at the central portion of the Vajra really reminded me of some schematics I had seen of black holes on various physics sites, here is a good one:




I think this is a very old 3 dimensional representation of a black hole. The question is, if it is, where did the knowledge of a black hole come from in a time before science as we know it?

[
edit on 9-2-2012 by openminded2011 because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 08:38 PM
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reply to post by openminded2011
 


???? black hole indeed :/

______ one hour later

Thank god the black hole brought you back.. It'll be my pleasure to read your post




edit on 9-2-2012 by Glargod because: Update, there was a blank post and then there was a full post.. the wonders eh



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 08:38 PM
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It's a black hole alright and your post has moved beyond the speed of light out of our view.




ps. Sometimes when I go to the bathroom I see a black hole
edit on 9-2-2012 by libertytoall because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 08:40 PM
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reply to post by libertytoall
 





posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 08:43 PM
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nothing here. Can't see post. You found the blackhole?



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 08:47 PM
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The artifacts purpose is probably the same as this thread, which is to attract stars
Good one OP
I'll send a star to oblivion.



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 09:36 PM
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Very sorry, I am new to putting pictures up I have re posted.



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 09:39 PM
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No offense, but just because something has a little resemble of a black hole doesn't mean it is an proof it's for that...

History did predict the future, but now... The time does.

History predicted Huricane Katrina.
History predicted a major storm soon to kill us.



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 09:44 PM
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reply to post by matty1053
 


Maybe so, but I find it intriguing that an object meant to symbolize an indestructible irresistible force, just happens to resemble a black hole which are arguably, the ultimate indestructible irresistible force.
edit on 9-2-2012 by openminded2011 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 09:51 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 09:54 PM
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reply to post by Kenrichaed
 


Sorry, I must have posted in the comedy thread. I thought this was the ancient civilizations lost civilization thread.



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 09:58 PM
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Originally posted by openminded2011
reply to post by Kenrichaed
 


Sorry, I must have posted in the comedy thread. I thought this was the ancient civilizations lost civilization thread.


Posting in the comedy thread might have worked a bit better....lol

I would suggest you read up on the basics of Buddhism and what the Varja is and what it means when associated with the Dri bul.



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 10:05 PM
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So in 3000 years are people going to look back at us if they ever find a dumbbell of ours and think to themselves "black hole" ?





The fact is it could be anything from a blackhole to a butt plug
edit on 9-2-2012 by libertytoall because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 10:35 PM
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There are no such things as black holes. Those pics of things where black holes are "known" to exist is wrong. They "assume" that's what it is.

Your item is a representation of a cosmic thunderbolt. Well known. Artifacts just like this are found throughout the world. Check this out.



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 11:27 PM
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It also looks very similar to the thunderbolt that Zeus carried. The most destructive power known to the Greeks.

Here is one example, there are plenty more.

en.wikipedia.org...

And just for grins and giggles, do a search for the "Shake Weight".

J.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 05:52 AM
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reply to post by J-in-TX
 


It also looks very similar to the thunderbolt that Zeus carried.

And that is precisely what it is meant to represent: a thunderbolt wielded as a weapon by Indra, the king of the Hindu Vedic gods, who was the Indian equivalent of the Greek Zeus.

Vajra or vajira means both thunderbolt and diamond in Sanskrit.

In Tantric Buddhism, the vajra is the symbol of sudden, profound and shocking enlightenment – the kind that destroys to create. It is associated with the Tantric discipline of vajrayana, the so-called 'diamond path' to enlightenment. Essentially, vajrayana consists of deliberate, wildly excessive self-indulgence in pleasure and the breaking of all moral precepts and social taboos up to and including the one against taking human life. This is done in order to surfeit the self with worldly things so that it will finally sicken and reject them, at which point enlightenment is said to come like a thunderbolt – hence the name.

Obviously it doesn't look anything like a black hole.

These things are pretty common, you know. One of my friends keeps an old brass one on his coffee table. Buddhists with a taste for the occult (or the macabre) often use them as amulets.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 12:11 PM
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I don't see the black hole, sorry.
edit on 10-2-2012 by JoshF because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 04:42 PM
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it was just a ritual item that they probably used to try and summon rain... like a rain dance



posted on Feb, 19 2012 @ 12:11 AM
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It's a dumbbell!



posted on Feb, 19 2012 @ 12:25 AM
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Originally posted by openminded2011
The question is, if it is, where did the knowledge of a black hole come from in a time before science as we know it?










 
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