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Behind the Swoosh: Your clothes come from this type of sweatshop hell

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posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 04:14 PM
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U.S. corporate-state imperialism with hundreds of military bases in foreign countries is set up to ensure and protect extreme poverty so that mega-profits can be raked in for the elite. The U.S. masses remain ignorant of the real conditions of global destruction from U.S. corporations, with any mention of exploitation shot down as "unverified." This brief expose documentary lays out the truth for all to see -- the conspiracy behind Nike clothing serves as the tip of the iceberg for other mega-transnational U.S. based corp$es.

Do people really want to wear these clothes to look nice now that you know what conditions they are made in?

Goons - paramilitary thugs funded by U.S. military aid -- a global police force for the corporate slave masters.


edit on 28-1-2012 by fulllotusqigong because: to ensure that this indeed is part of the NWO

edit on 28-1-2012 by fulllotusqigong because: (no reason given)

edit on 28-1-2012 by fulllotusqigong because: vid

edit on 28-1-2012 by fulllotusqigong because: vid




posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 04:43 PM
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My god this isn't slavery. These people choose to work those jobs for that pay, I don't feel sorry for them.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by Fitch303
 


Working there because there are no other options is not a choice.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 04:58 PM
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Originally posted by InvisibleAlbatross
reply to post by Fitch303
 


Working there because there are no other options is not a choice.


Agreed, at least they have a job and are not starving to death..

You would do this with a smile too if your families
survival depended on it.
Yes horrible but what can we do?

Us buying the clothes they are making are
allowing them to SURVIVE and thrive.

WITHOUT US buying the stuff they are making
they would die, starve to death, or work on a crappy farm.

I hope they get better rights and conditions get better.
Insightful video but do not let it *make you feel bad*
YOU ARE FEEDING THESE PEOPLE..



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 05:09 PM
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reply to post by Fitch303
 


slaveryfootprint.org...

See how many slaves work for you.

I didn't say that the Nike expose vid is slavery but it's definitely slave-like conditions. If the workers try to organize a union then they get killed.

What I did say is that Nike is part of a U.S. imperial corporate-state system that does rely on massive slavery.

For example there are about 150,000 children in slavery to produce most of the U.S. consumed chocolate. So when your kids are eating chocolate candy they are supporting child slavery.



Also the non-violent crime offenders in U.S. prisons making tons of products are another type of slave-like condition. Maybe not literally slavery but slave-like conditions -- and this does include sweatshops:




Saipan Workers Describe Slavery of Sweatshops They say American Dream turned into nightmare


sweatshop slavery

edit on 28-1-2012 by fulllotusqigong because: link



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 05:15 PM
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reply to post by popsmayhem
 


On the contrary boycotts have been the effective strategy by U.S. activists to stop sweatshops as this expose on Nike reveals -- an action by the Workers Rights Consortium

Nike Agrees to Help Laid-Off Workers



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by InvisibleAlbatross
 


Right but we in the U.S. have the choice and the responsibilty to confront U.S. corporations creating these horrible working conditions.

U.S. Justice Dept holds up the Workers Rights Consortium

For years the University of Minnesota has held back on signing on to the Code of Conduct for the Workers Rights Consortium until they heard about the above decision by the Justice Dept. I had to personally meet with the lawyer running the University for nine meetings -- after we students organized a campaign to support the Workers Rights Consortium membership. The University did join but refused to sign the Code of Conduct. Now they have no excuse.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 05:24 PM
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I highly recommend the documentary The New rulers of The World. It gives some additional information about the working conditions inside those Indonesian sweatshops. But it doesn't stop there. It also provides the historical and geopolitical background and looks at the roots of globalisation.

John Pilger - The New rulers of The World




edit on 28-1-2012 by Drunkenshrew because: italic font for name



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 05:52 PM
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Originally posted by Fitch303
My god this isn't slavery. These people choose to work those jobs for that pay, I don't feel sorry for them.


Nice.

Slaves get free food and housing. When you work eighteen hours, and all you get paid is not even enough for housing and food, well, it's actually WORSE than slavery.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 05:54 PM
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Originally posted by popsmayhem

Originally posted by InvisibleAlbatross
reply to post by Fitch303
 


Working there because there are no other options is not a choice.


Agreed, at least they have a job and are not starving to death..

You would do this with a smile too if your families
survival depended on it.
Yes horrible but what can we do?

Us buying the clothes they are making are
allowing them to SURVIVE and thrive.

WITHOUT US buying the stuff they are making
they would die, starve to death, or work on a crappy farm.

I hope they get better rights and conditions get better.
Insightful video but do not let it *make you feel bad*
YOU ARE FEEDING THESE PEOPLE..


You obviously don't understand anything.

So before Nike came there, everyone in Indonesia was starving? They should thank Nike for supporting them, right?



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 06:07 PM
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Us buying the clothes they are making are allowing them to SURVIVE and thrive.


Because I'm sure the people working in these sweat shops get a nice bonus from a sale of these, right?

Link

No.

Corporate greed is never a good thing.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 06:08 PM
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reply to post by CaptChaos
 


Well under the Strict Caste System,, yes that was true.,,
For only a Unclean Person actually worked, with thier hands,,, dont ask me why,, just a big hand fetish or something,,dont know,,
Starving by the thousands,, yes.

Me.
edit on 28-1-2012 by BobAthome because: (no reason given)


maybe its a job for MintBerryCrunch !,, Shaaaslaa,,,,
edit on 28-1-2012 by BobAthome because:




posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 06:11 PM
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And we in the "west" wonder why we are being demonized. What's being done in the name of cheap products is immoral and, honestly, a crime against humanity.
It wouldn't bother most people in the USA to spend a buck and a quarter a day to feed their dog or buy a cheap cup of coffee. These people live on that much.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 06:22 PM
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reply to post by Tinman67
 


Fair Trade Stores List --

Yeah fair trade apparel is out there.



edit on 28-1-2012 by fulllotusqigong because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 07:20 PM
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reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


Exactly why I don't buy NIKE or any other name brands. It seems the more they cost in the US the more greedy the company. No one can honestly say that there are no alternatives. They are just too self centered and lazy to care. Karma its alive and well and coming home to roost. ENJOY!



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 07:25 PM
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reply to post by redrose123
 


Talk about coming home to roost -- even the TARP salary caps were avoided by the corporate-state elite



AMY GOODMAN: Juan, before we move on with our first segment, you have an interesting column in the New York Daily News today about the Treasury Department approving huge paydays for execs from firms that actually received TARP bailout money. JUAN GONZALEZ: Yeah, you know, I was shocked that this got very little attention earlier this week when the inspector general for the TARP program released his audit. The audit showed that as many as 49 executives at a handful of firms that received the biggest bailouts received from $5 million and up in compensation, approved by the special master that the Treasury Department appointed, Kenneth Feinberg, to review executive compensation. And we’re talking about the firms that got the largest payouts, including AIG, General Motors, the largest bailouts. And AIG was by far the worst. In fact, Feinberg told the auditors that that company represented 80 percent of his headaches over the past few years. The most interesting part of the audit, though, I thought, was that Feinberg reported that the Treasury Department and officials at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York were regularly pressuring him to increase the pay of these bailed-out firms. Now, understand, AIG was 90 percent owned by the federal government, after receiving $180 billion in bailouts. It is still 70 percent owned by the taxpayers. And yet the CEO of AIG, Robert Benmosche, received $10.5 million in ’09, $10.5 million in ’10, and $10.5 million in 2011, including $3 million in cash every year, even though Congress and President Obama had said they were going to limit executive pay to $500,000 a year. And the one— AMY GOODMAN: CEO of Allied Financial, you quote? JUAN GONZALEZ: Yes, at one point, the CEO of Allied Financial complained that one of his executives was being reduced from a million to $500,000 a year, and he said that that executive would be made cash poor, because he had a couple of kids in private school, and he wouldn’t be able to meet his monthly bills on a salary of only $500,000 a year. And these are the kinds of abuses that have taxpayers furious. Here are people, millions of people, losing their homes, losing their jobs, and these executives, who have received federal money, bailouts, are demanding these enormous salaries—and getting them—despite the limits that were supposed to be placed by the Treasury Department on employee compensation. AMY GOODMAN: Now, of course, Tim Geithner is Treasury Secretary, was head of the Federal Reserve in New York. JUAN GONZALEZ: Right, and it was his assistants who were pressuring Feinberg to increase the pay, because they were warning that if these executives left the companies, that the government would not be able to get paid back its money. Of course, the audit found that 85 percent of the executives, the top executives at these companies, the top 25 at each of the companies, that was there in 2009 when the bailout started, was still there. In other words, very few of them actually left, despite the caps on pay. AMY GOODMAN: Well, we’ll certainly continue to follow that story. Good column.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 08:32 PM
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Originally posted by Fitch303
My god this isn't slavery. These people choose to work those jobs for that pay, I don't feel sorry for them.


Perhaps your god hasn't awakened compassion in you just yet then. There must be some more important lessons you have to learn. But you will find compassion is the end result of all of the lessons to be learned here.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 08:11 PM
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Originally posted by Fitch303
My god this isn't slavery. These people choose to work those jobs for that pay, I don't feel sorry for them.


No, it's capitalist exploitation.

It's why there are no jobs in the US.

The cycle of capitalist exploitation. Exploit a country, make it wealthy until workers naturally demand better pay and conditions, eventually profit margins become too small for capitalists greed, so they move shop to where they can exploit workers again for larger profits. This is why the Americas were invaded by European capitalists to begin with. This is why your government likes immigration, easier for capitalists to exploit.

Should Americans accept lower wages and worse working conditions simply to have a job? No, we need to change the economic system that allows economic exploitation.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 08:44 PM
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My heart aches for those workers, and my blood boils at our greed, apathy, and materialism.

Such sweatshop workers are nearly forced into such slavery. Before modernization, these people lived balanced lives in balanced communities. Tear down their traditional lives and build roads, banks, and factories. How can they continue their traditional lives in a boom town city? The only work now is at the factory.

Entire cities and systems are created to tear down traditional living for economic slavery.

No more Nike for me.




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