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1,100 year old tomb of a female singer related to Amon-Ra, unearthed in Egypt.

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posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:23 AM
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Originally posted by thePharaoh

Originally posted by Byrd

Horus didn't need any protection, Hathor is the daughter (in some stories) of Ra (but not Amon Ra), and she's not the singer of the gods. Although her name means "House of Horus" it appears in relation to being goddess of the sky and not a protector of Horus (who didn't really need any protecting. She's not the one who protects the infant Horus)


hathor, was known as the goddess of many faces....she took on the role of the fiery eye of Re as sekhmet.
she was also known as the sistirum player....who played music for the gods......also the coffin mentions Bast....as sekhmet is the aggressive hathor...bast would be the passive hathor.

It's Bast who has the sistrum as her emblem, and Bast is at least as old (earliest mention) as Hathor.


IF the texts claim that its the daughter of "AMUN ra"....then its from the 22nd/rammesside period when the gods amun and ra were stronlgy merged....

Yes. The article cited after the Huffpo one said it was from that era.


and how can you say horus didnt need protection?....when he was young he needed protection from his uncle seth... hathor raised him hidden in the marshes......untill he was strong and old enough to battle seth

If you'll doublecheck that, I think you'll find it was Isis who protected him, not Hathor.


she was buried as hathor...to fulfill her role in the afterlife....

What are you basing your statement on? The coffin doesn't have any of the emblems of Hathor on it. Can you show archaeological evidence about that grave (the inscriptions, perhaps) so that we can look at it and determine this? Standard titles for singers don't include Hathor (at least, not in the examples that I see).
.

she would of been a mother of someone important........
Most women's names were not mentioned in lineages (the exception being wives and queens.) If she was the mother of someone important, her titles would have included "beloved mother of (yaddayadda)" -- it's part of the standard funerary inscriptions. So I don't see why you'd say this, either, unless you had copies of the inscriptions on the coffin and with the mummy (if any) and on the tomb. If so, I'd love to see pictures of them (I adore this kind of stuff!)


that was my first impression....
If I am understanding this correctly, you're basing your idea that she was a mother simply on looking at the picture and not on any inscriptions or artifacts found with her? Because, frankly, looking at the coffin and the fact that it was reused indicates that whoever was responsible for burying her did not have a lot of money and power (otherwise it would have been a coffin for her and not a hand-me-down) and would have been engraved and decorated better -- and the names of her children would have been clearly stated.




posted on Jan, 27 2012 @ 04:21 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd

It's Bast who has the sistrum as her emblem, and Bast is at least as old (earliest mention) as Hathor.
If you'll doublecheck that, I think you'll find it was Isis who protected him, not Hathor.


no..isis gave birth to him....hathor protected him from seth....hathor is the oldest female goddess...so in pre egypt and the first few dynasties, she was celestial mother goddess of the horus kings....

but hathor is more important/older.......the other goddesses who came later assimulated her roles.... isis, sekhmet, bastet, nut, neith etc etc


she was buried as hathor...to fulfill her role in the afterlife....
What are you basing your statement on? The coffin doesn't have any of the emblems of Hathor on it. Can you show archaeological evidence about that grave (the inscriptions, perhaps) so that we can look at it and determine this? Standard titles for singers don't include Hathor (at least, not in the examples that I see).


bastet...is....hathor
and im basing my statement on the fact that its a "coffin"....

here look... coffin texts:

spell 334......BECOMING THE SISTRUM-PLAYER O You [...]...I am that first seed of Ra; he begot me in the womb of my mother Isis [...]powerful in the sky, mighty (on) earth. Such is my condition before my father Ra and my mother [...], I will be in this land in company of the living, I desire my [name]to be on their lips as the Sistrum-player, son of Hathor.

spell 483 (full)
i am one who followed the sole musician of hathor, i have come to the place where my mistress is so that i may see her beauty and give her the dress.


see!
.

she would of been a mother of someone important........
Most women's names were not mentioned in lineages (the exception being wives and queens.) If she was the mother of someone important, her titles would have included "beloved mother of (yaddayadda)" -- it's part of the standard funerary inscriptions. So I don't see why you'd say this, either, unless you had copies of the inscriptions on the coffin and with the mummy (if any) and on the tomb. If so, I'd love to see pictures of them (I adore this kind of stuff!)


egypt was a maitrachy.
she was buried as 'the' sistirium player.....1+1 = 2

she wasnt a slave girl, or a virgin priestess, preistess`s 'belong' to the temple...they do not get buried like this.



If I am understanding this correctly, you're basing your idea that she was a mother simply on looking at the picture and not on any inscriptions or artifacts found with her? Because, frankly, looking at the coffin and the fact that it was reused indicates that whoever was responsible for burying her did not have a lot of money and power (otherwise it would have been a coffin for her and not a hand-me-down) and would have been engraved and decorated better -- and the names of her children would have been clearly stated.


not anyone can be the sistirum player for that particular dead king unless they are related....

ok...anything classed as "re-used" needs further investigation.....as its known that TPTB make finds...take what the like...then re-bury lame artifacts...sometimes off site.

that seems to be closer to the truth here than thinking someone stole, not only her tomb, but her coffin...

i`ll sum it up

1) member of royal family
2) site 'already excavated'...... probably 20 yrs ago

edit on 27-1-2012 by thePharaoh because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-1-2012 by thePharaoh because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-1-2012 by thePharaoh because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2012 @ 03:50 AM
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reply to post by thePharaoh
 



The 22nd Dynasty was most certainly NOT associated or in any way related to a "ramesside period".
The Ramesside Dynasty was the 19th Dynasty, (1298 BC - 1187 BC) .
The 22nd Dynasty, (943 BC - 720 BC), was a dynasty of Libyan rulers and the time period is now commonly referred, in Egyptology, as the Third Intermediate Period.
So, the timeline is pretty much off, in aspect of dynasties and also in reference to the female mummy in question.

Also, when you attempt to translate religious AE texts you MUST keep in mind the period they are from, as the mythology and lore was subject to change with time and different rulers.
Names and meanings of gods were changed and a deity once known for one thing was simply moved to another alleged location or paired up with other deities and merged as one or a trinity, etc.

For example, "SA- RE" in the Old Kingdom was a prefix to a pharaonic name and meant "Son of RA", (sat-RE for females).
In the Middle Kingdom, however, SA RE was a deity. The name of the sun god.

Personally, I am pretty much convinced the woman in question here was indeed a "singer" and most likely no blood relation to any royalty, much less deity.

Sometimes, people would die unexpectedly or there might have been some other reason why they would have to be buried hastily, without enough time left to produce a personalized tomb or coffin or other required personalized objects.
For instance, some of Tutankhamen's canopic artifacts and a couple of other objects in his tomb were originally made for a royal wife named Kia, (who was also alleged to be his mother).
edit on 29-1-2012 by VivaLaEvolution because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2012 @ 05:29 PM
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Originally posted by VivaLaEvolution
reply to post by thePharaoh
 



The 22nd Dynasty was most certainly NOT associated or in any way related to a "ramesside period".
The Ramesside Dynasty was the 19th Dynasty, (1298 BC - 1187 BC) .
The 22nd Dynasty, (943 BC - 720 BC), was a dynasty of Libyan rulers and the time period is now commonly referred, in Egyptology, as the Third Intermediate Period.
So, the timeline is pretty much off, in aspect of dynasties and also in reference to the female mummy in question.


hahah....who this...!!...you wanna rep...lets role!

firstly...the rammeside period TILL the third intermediate period........

when amun and ra became very strongly linked.


get it!





Personally, I am pretty much convinced the woman in question here was indeed a "singer" and most likely no blood relation to any royalty, much less deity.


really.... a singer!
well....i think its her role in the afterlife....rejuvinating the dead kings ba.....7th hour of the amduat.




Sometimes, people would die unexpectedly or there might have been some other reason why they would have to be buried hastily, without enough time left to produce a personalized tomb or coffin or other required personalized objects.


but they had time to mummyfy her?....




For instance, some of Tutankhamen's canopic artifacts and a couple of other objects in his tomb were originally made for a royal wife named Kia, (who was also alleged to be his mother).


tut again....well he was 14 when he unexpectedly died...



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 05:29 PM
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reply to post by thePharaoh
 


They had time to embalm Tut also, 14 years old or not. Didn't they?
The 70 days the embalming took were mandatory and required the body. Reusing tombs and objects for the ceremony or afterlife is something that has been done, more than once.

I apparently misunderstood your first post, (22nd dynasty), so to avoid further misunderstandings - you say her "role in the afterlife was rejuvenating the king's Ba". Are you saying she's been sacrificed to accompany a deceased pharaoh?



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