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Creation And The Mind

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posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 05:11 PM
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Hi everyone. I'm a music composer, and I find that when I listen to music that I've composed, I often get extremely relaxed to the point of falling asleep. Even if I was wide awake a few minutes earlier. I've written hours of music from different genres, and if I want to take a nap, I just sit back and listen to my playlist. Within 2 or 3 songs, I'll be dozing off. The sound of my own music flows into my brain like a friend, recognizing its home of origin and putting me into an extremely pleasant state of mind.

So I was wondering, has anyone else experienced phenomena similar to this? Any other artists find that your own creations have a profound effect on you after you've completed them? This goes for musicians, singers, writers, painters, etc. What are some of the effects you've noticed by listening to/reading/viewing something wonderful that you've created?

This only applies to work that you are satisfied with. If you look at your work and cringe, or can't stop thinking about how you could change it, then it isn't a satisfying work of art. I'm talking about the effects of what you consider a completed work of art, or even a masterpiece.




posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 05:19 PM
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I wouldn't classify what you describe as phenomena. I'd classify it as pretty normal. Im certain that a huge mass of people fall asleep easier with certain music playing whether they've made the music or just put in a cd.
edit on 15-1-2012 by FloatingGhost because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 05:25 PM
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reply to post by FloatingGhost
 


Maybe I didn't explain it properly. It's already a documented science that listening to music does affect the brain in positive ways. What I'm trying to identify is a unique effect. It's a notably different experience when I listen to Vivaldi, or Killswitch Engage, than when I listen to something I've created. Also, no matter what genre I'm listening to of my own work, whether it's cinematic/classical or heavy metal or chiptunes, I always become more relaxed than I ever can with any other method of relaxation.



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 05:31 PM
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Sounds a bit narcissistic.



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 05:33 PM
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reply to post by FloatingGhost
 


Narcissistic? Really? You must not be an artist to make a comment like that.



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 05:56 PM
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reply to post by OrphenFire
 


what you are misconceiving from my perspective is the value of sleeping, which is zero so not positive value, no superiority sense

so i guess you are right in those terms i said, as i cant read what i wrote i also struggle to stay awake, it is impossible to b against urself but that what u mean when u see urself

while for instance whatever i see right in objective realities of else or others but more in objective general terms it makes me b able to stay conscious freely in effective constant terms that surprise me always about truth, how it is always what exist in absolute terms



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 05:59 PM
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reply to post by OrphenFire
 


I totally see where you are coming from here.

I am a guitarist and play lead. When I am really "in the zone" playing, it is like an altered state of consciousness.

I can't even seem to converse or deal with what is happening around me (except for the music) when I am playing lead. It's like all my mental effort and energy is channeled into the one thing.

I think the sound encodes the mathematics of pattern that is unique to each listener/creator. In the case of the creator, it is perfectly "in tune" with the mind that created it.

I think that is also why it is so hard to be critical of your own works. You have to try very hard to listen to a piece "cold" like someone else would, otherwise you may well be producing stuff that is inconsequential and empty to other people.
edit on 15/1/2012 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 06:13 PM
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reply to post by OrphenFire
 


I am an artist. I'm not poking fun at you. Speaking from a psychological point of view, the feeling that u described being caused specifically by YOUR music and not others seems narciccistic in nature. My own music doesn't give me a peace...it gives me a headache. I never see my stuff as done. Someone once told me that an artist never finishes a piece. He merely stops working on it. I know everyone is different but that struck home for me.



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 06:13 PM
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reply to post by OrphenFire
 
I'm a visual artist, self-taught, realism-- portraits of children mostly. They don't make me sleepy to look at, lol, but I do pause at the few I own and wonder at the mystery of their creation. I remember sitting for hours that seemed like minutes, I know I painted or drew them, but I just don't know exactly remember the entire process, because I go into a sort of meditative state and 'wake up' with a piece of artwork. So in a very real sense, I don't know how I accomplished it, due to the 'zone out' state, so I stop and wonder at them sometimes, and wonder when it will happen again.

Do you remember every detail of the process of your musical creations? Just curious if you 'zone out' when you get in the groove.



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 06:17 PM
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First narcissism, like selfishness, is not always a bad thing. Both can be of value,individually and collectively.
Some of the finest works of art and scientific theories come from a narcissist place, in terms of solitary individuals, caring about their work(includes themselves) first first and foremost, especially over any social status quo.

Now the creative thing, yes, I have experienced what you are speaking of, both with songs and paintings. I think our creative projects are like giving birth to our children, in a sense. We keep the projects with us, adore and support them, and sometimes spur their growth into something greater.

My painting experience was one that continues to offer a calm effect, both in the finished works and the process. I got into abstract painting and began utilizing some zen approaches. The results were, well, zennish, and as they hang in my house, they contribute to a vibe that is calming. I have had comments from friends regarding this. The newfound(to me) process was one that continues to affect my approach and process with creativity. I first empty myself of intention and expectation, letting the process take over, and fully cultivating the moment, as many zen artists do. This not the only way to be creative, but for me it has had lasting results. I had a successful solo art gallery show last year, and some of the comments were "feeling the artist's state of mind" when viewing the works, which was calming and relaxing.

Peace,
spec



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 06:22 PM
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reply to post by OrphenFire
 


I've been producing music for quite awhile now. I do sometimes get the "phenomenon" that you are describing. As we know, music, and more importantly rhythm, provides a relaxing and positive effect to the brain and mind. However, each individual has their on internal rhythm, so, when you are creating your own music you are creating music that matches that. As opposed to listening to a band's rhythm.



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by ErroneousDylan
 


I think that's the closest thing to what happens. The rhythm (not necessarily the actual rhythm of the music) of the creation fits like a puzzle piece into the creator's mind.



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by FloatingGhost
 


It's not that I only enjoy my own music or experience beneficial psychological effects from my own. I enjoy many different musicians and styles for different reasons. I think it's just that my brain doesn't have the creator's connection to something that Beethoven wrote. And while I can listen to his music for hours in awe, admiring the creative genius and vast superiority over my own work, it doesn't have the psychological connection in my mind that says, "I made that."



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 06:48 PM
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reply to post by new_here
 


When writing music, I don't go into a meditative state. When playing music, yes. When I'm writing, it's more like I'm working. I'm creating something, but my brain goes through the same process as it does when I'm putting a puzzle together. It's as if the music already exists in a broken form. The pieces are hidden, and I have to find them and put them together properly. That's sort of how composing works for me. Although I do focus 100% of my mind on what I'm doing and I can barely notice any outside distractions. Sometimes my wife gets angry and has to yell to get my attention



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