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The World We Live In

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posted on Dec, 26 2011 @ 07:06 PM
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These past two days have been quite out of the ordinary, to put it mildly. Yesterday, the power went out. It affected most of the western side of my country, including the farmers, whom supports us with all our needs during the season. Around a hundred thousand people went without power. We had to rely on candles for lighting, and the entertainment for ourselves.

At first, it was boring. Really boring. The loss of the internet and television left us mute. We didn’t have anything to talk about. I, myself, found this incredibly sad, because I was aware of this fact. But eventually we adapted, and we found a game that got us talking and socializing. It was rewarding, because I learned things about my progenitors that no written history could tell me. And we found a side of ourselves that was never shown when all the other distractions were around, e.g. the television, radio and the internet.

The next morning the power was still off, but it eventually came back.. a few hours later. After about 16 hours without power.

That same day, I saw a programme on the television, it featured a family that had become self-reliant farmers. The parents were well educated people, the father had a degree in philosophy and the mother was an immigrant with a degree in linguistics. They had realized we lived in a society that worshipped capitalism and consumerism. They wanted to live a lifestyle that made them feel well about themselves, and a lifestyle that didn’t require them to be reliant on anything else than their crops and animals. The presenter asked ”why?”, ”don’t you want a big comfy sofa and a big television?”, they told him that the sofa could not ever get too big and the television not too huge. It was a matter of always being discontent and unhappy. That was what our society revolved around.

I admire this family, because they realise what’s wrong with our society. We have the ability to feed over the billion people that walk around hungry all the time, but we don’t have the will to converge around this idea. Some of us can either live in overabundance and unhappiness, or we can all live in content with what we have, and appreciate each other for who we are. The fact that we can all live in content, but don’t have the will to live within our means, is very tragic. It’s a fine line between the two, but we, as a society, should be able to consolidate our powers to feed the whole world, because we can. We can all live a happy and content way of life, but we don't. Why is that..




posted on Dec, 26 2011 @ 07:28 PM
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You're lucky.

Cell phones prevent most people from having to acknowledge each other during a power outtage. What with all the games and apps on the unit itself. It would probably take 16 hours of power outtage for the cells to run down enough that people might actually start being human again. Unfortunately resentments would already have broken out over who was the last one to have power on their device, so that any ensuing discussions will already have been soured.

Luck, I say, because the old timers know how to light a candle and break out the cards, or a board game. Or just talk to each other like fully realized human beings.


David Grouchy



posted on Dec, 26 2011 @ 07:42 PM
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reply to post by davidgrouchy
 




the old timers know how to light a candle and break out the cards, or a board game. Or just talk to each other like fully realized human beings.
As the youngest, ironically, I got the idea to play a game, and I watched the programme that featured this particular family on the television. The old timers told the stories of my ancestors, though. No one else could've done that.

It was interesting to watch a family that actually did something because of their beliefs, instead of doing nothing but talk about it. It was just as interesting to see that their children were materialistic and focused on consumerism, showing no interest in their parents' way of life.

I don't know, but I think there's a valuable message in this.



posted on Dec, 26 2011 @ 07:47 PM
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Yes, I do too.

I remember in the 70's a lot of discussion asking "Is television usurping parental authority." A huge propaganda campaign was released and we were given the rating system. There hasn't been a parent in a household in America since. As far as knowing about our ancestors this new generation may as well have been hatch from eggs.


David Grouchy



posted on Dec, 26 2011 @ 07:48 PM
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Originally posted by Droogie

We have the ability to feed over the billion people that walk around hungry all the time, but we don’t have the [color=gold] will to converge around this idea.

. . .

Why is that..



Hmmm.

"The will to converge around this idea."

I think it may be that everyone secretly wants to become famous, and then use the TV to show everyone else what Idea to converge around. The will is tied up in trying to study fame, and how to project an image. Sarcastically put "If it was an idea worth converging on, the TV would have told me". So we can see that the "why" is because the will itself is blocking the move. The will knows that TV can eat any one of your ideas. So watching TV is important stuff.

I'm trying to say that conversation is a skill, and I'm finding fewer and fewer people who can do it well.


David Grouchy



posted on Dec, 26 2011 @ 07:55 PM
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reply to post by Droogie
 


The reason we don't do that is very spiritual. I'll leave it at that.



At least from how I see the world.

SnF fo anr outstanding thread.
edit on 26-12-2011 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



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