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Chess Strategy Question

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posted on Dec, 11 2011 @ 03:48 AM
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Not sure if this is the right place to ask it, but I'll ask it anyway: do you have any effective chess strategies? I'm not really good at chess and will be facing a crafty enemy plus the stakes are high. Any advce you may give me is welcome!




posted on Dec, 11 2011 @ 04:14 AM
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reply to post by survivaloftheslickest
 

I'm not really good at chess and will be facing a crafty enemy plus the stakes are high.

Here is some advice:

[color=75FFAC]If you're not very good at chess, don't get yourself involved in a high-stake game vs. a crafty opponent.




edit on 12/11/11 by BrokenCircles because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2011 @ 04:16 AM
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Originally posted by BrokenCircles
reply to post by survivaloftheslickest
 

I'm not really good at chess and will be facing a crafty enemy plus the stakes are high.

Here is some advice:

[color=75FFAC]If you're not very good at chess, don't get yourself involved in a high-stake game vs. a crafty opponent.




edit on 12/11/11 by BrokenCircles because: (no reason given)


Fair enough, but the circumstances are what they are. Isn't that simple



posted on Dec, 11 2011 @ 04:22 AM
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reply to post by survivaloftheslickest
 


Ok then, maybe better advice would be→ [color=BDFFF4]Practice

If you haven't played in awhile, or haven't played much, join a chess site and get practicing.

This might be helpful too: Chess.com Learn



posted on Dec, 11 2011 @ 04:27 AM
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There is no single "chess" strategy you can be given, it's not that kind of game. You're either good or you aren't, and if you aren't, you're most likely going to lose. The only way forward is to learn how to play well.

However.

What I can recommend for the very short term is:

1) learn some basic openings for white and black, and make them opening like King's Indian that can be played against a wide range of openings your opponent might play, as it's less to learn then
2) in the middle game, keep things simple and try to control the center rather than launching into attacks and throwing pawns forward. try to focus on your stronger opponent more so even than your own progress, and look carefully for any mistakes (tactical/positional) he might make. Just try to play solid and principled
3) If he is "crafty" as you say, he's probably pretty tactical and might be less comfortable in boring positional games, so be happy to exchange pieces and make him try to get too fancy and make an error or overextend himself

If the majority of the above has gone over your head, as it likely would for a real beginner, then your only hope of to get a beginner's chess book and learn the basics. No shortcuts in chess mate, it's a very hard game!



posted on Dec, 11 2011 @ 04:33 AM
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Oh, and if you like, sign up www.chesscube.com (it's free), and I'd be more than happy to play some games against you and give you some tips!

My account name is "humphreys" and I usually play a little over 1800 rating. Not a pro or anything but more than enough to beat the vast majority of casual players.



posted on Dec, 11 2011 @ 04:45 AM
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Originally posted by humphreysjim
Oh, and if you like, sign up www.chesscube.com (it's free), and I'd be more than happy to play some games against you and give you some tips!

My account name is "humphreys" and I usually play a little over 1800 rating. Not a pro or anything but more than enough to beat the vast majority of casual players.


Thanks



posted on Dec, 11 2011 @ 04:56 AM
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Originally posted by humphreysjim
There is no single "chess" strategy you can be given, it's not that kind of game. You're either good or you aren't, and if you aren't, you're most likely going to lose. The only way forward is to learn how to play well.

However.

What I can recommend for the very short term is:

1) learn some basic openings for white and black, and make them opening like King's Indian that can be played against a wide range of openings your opponent might play, as it's less to learn then
2) in the middle game, keep things simple and try to control the center rather than launching into attacks and throwing pawns forward. try to focus on your stronger opponent more so even than your own progress, and look carefully for any mistakes (tactical/positional) he might make. Just try to play solid and principled
3) If he is "crafty" as you say, he's probably pretty tactical and might be less comfortable in boring positional games, so be happy to exchange pieces and make him try to get too fancy and make an error or overextend himself

If the majority of the above has gone over your head, as it likely would for a real beginner, then your only hope of to get a beginner's chess book and learn the basics. No shortcuts in chess mate, it's a very hard game!


Check, mate!


He pretty much said everything I was going to say, so I'll just redirect you upwards. Read it again. You got yourself into that position, and only you can get yourself out of it. Practice, practice, practice. And when you think you've got it mastered, practice some more. Best of luck to ya, my friend.


Cheers,
Strype



posted on Dec, 11 2011 @ 05:27 AM
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Strategy in chess is a very delicate matter. It is something you have to practice to get good at, not really something you "do." Being rated over 2000 qualifies me to give advice, at least to anyone rated under that, lol, in case you were wondering what my skill level was.

With that said, it is all about the situation, the opening and defense used, and finding and EXPLOITING imbalances. Everything comes into play. Pawn structure, B vs N, good vs. bad bishops, open or closed game, knowing which side of the board is best to play on during a particular game, etc, etc.

There are just too many nuances to give you "strategy" advice. The best advice I could give you is NOT to play passively and without a plan. Having any plan is better than none at all. Choose an opening, depending on what color you are, that will give you the type of open/closed game you are comfortable with. That is another aspect, which is knowing what types of openings lead to what types of positions.

I could give you some general strategic guidelines, which may or may not apply to your game, but they are better than nothing. If your opponent is initiating a flank attack, counter-attack in the center. Never initiate a flank attack if the center is open.

Play in the center, and play FOR the center. CONTROL the CENTER, lol, I cannot stress that enough. Doing that lets you control the pace of the game. Don't make any sacrifices, as with your experience they probably are not justified.

I am assuming that you DO know how to actually play the game, and somewhat know a little bit already btw...If not, then like the first poster said, you shouldn't be playing high stakes games. If you are straight up a beginner, you should at least attempt to calculate 3 half-moves in your head, which is your move, your opponent's response, and your reply after that.

Do that every move, and once you find a move you like, look for a better one. If you do that every turn, and your opponent is evenly matched with you as far as level goes, you may just win

Also, everyone always tells beginners the basic opening principals, which mainly consist of concentrating on developing ALL your minor pieces and CASTLING early, before launching any offensive attacks. This is probably the most important thing to remember in the opening. Concentrate all your pieces on one objective, which is your plan. Also, don't bring your queen out before your minor pieces, so don't play something like the center-counter if black...Also avoid defenses like the Alekhine if black, as they are probably too nuanced for your skill level.

ETA: Minor pieces are bishops and knights. Also, after developing your minor pieces, and castling, develop your queen to connect your rooks. This is if you are following a strict basic opening principles repertoire.
edit on 12/11/11 by JiggyPotamus because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2011 @ 05:30 AM
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Try to learn some opening tricks. You might get him with your surprise opening. That is your only chance.



posted on Dec, 11 2011 @ 06:45 AM
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reply to post by wavemaker
 


i agree with havemaker..

go hail mary and learn some trick openings...in a longer game you will most likely always loose

google is your friend

..



posted on Dec, 11 2011 @ 06:58 AM
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Originally posted by Acetradamus
reply to post by wavemaker
 


i agree with havemaker..

go hail mary and learn some trick openings...in a longer game you will most likely always loose

google is your friend

..


Haily Mary it is.



posted on Dec, 11 2011 @ 09:04 AM
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reply to posts by Acetradamus & wavemaker
 

Terrible advice. I disagree with both of you.

Originally posted by wavemaker

Try to learn some opening tricks. You might get him with your surprise opening. That is your only chance.


Originally posted by Acetradamus

i agree with havemaker..

go hail mary and learn some trick openings...in a longer game you will most likely always loose

google is your friend


@survivaloftheslickest
If you're gonna take that advice, you might as well not even bother.
Lay your King down now, and walk away.



 
P.S. Never, and I repeat- NEVER take Chess advice from somebody who doesn't know the difference between 'loose' & 'lose'.



posted on Dec, 11 2011 @ 09:29 PM
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I was 21 when I beat my first grandmaster, with a Fide rating of 2595. I started playing when I was about 15. But I have long since given up chess to do other things… Although I still have skills

I know from experience that it takes a long time to master chess and you have to improve step by step, slowly over time. You can learn the basic theory and principles to improve, but it’s takes a long time to put it effectively into practice.

You really need to study the elements of the opening and opening principles, like development and piece coordination. Then you need to learn middle game themes and tactical/combinational ideas, which can be applied at different phases of the game. You also need some theoretical end game knowledge and finally you need to build up your overall ability to calculate variations accurately, which is closely interconnected to understanding middle game positions and knowing how to assess them.

Of course, all this type of knowledge is something, which has to be built up slowly over time.

I would recommend you practice first by playing people who are stronger than yourself, but you should occasionally play someone who is roughly at your own level, so that it doesn’t become too demoralizing.

Not really sure what other advice to give you, because a lot depends on what level your at right now, and to some degree, the strength and style of your opponent, is also an important factor.



- JC




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