(MRSA) Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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posted on Dec, 9 2011 @ 05:00 AM
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Originally posted by Cosmic911
Yes, antibiotic resistance is a major medical concern but it is manageable. People are greatly misinformed...a patient doesn't die from MRSA. A patient with MRSA dies because they are treated inappropriately and medically mistreated, or not cultured.


Are you sure? I'm fairly certain that reports of patients dying of MRSA abound, but that it's often immunocompromised individuals who develop systemic infections and bacteremia and then die of things like toxic shock and sepsis.




posted on Dec, 10 2011 @ 04:13 AM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 


My terrible medical advice is what is used in hospitals, but i'm sure you knew that....

2nd line



posted on Dec, 10 2011 @ 04:16 AM
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reply to post by lbndhr
 


Are you trying to stir up panic over something that is usually spread and contained in hospitals?

If anything, we all should wash our hands more often to avoid the spread of MOST diseases.



posted on Dec, 10 2011 @ 04:19 AM
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Ive had this TWICE , and I have a very heatlhy immune system and am a very clean person......

I guess it was just luck of the draw.......

Mine was traced back to possible contact at a hospital as well......and the second time because speculation of getting it at the gym

Both times it created a huge sore under the skin that had to be cut out and packed with gauze and medicated...

Not a fun time......

The guidelines of catching this seem to be a bit too simplistic



posted on Dec, 10 2011 @ 04:28 AM
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Swims Uncle is infected too but he fought it with Neem (Azadirachta indica)

I highly recommend a deeper Research about Neem and MRSA,
not only for the Op but for everyone who is fighting against nasty Bacterias and Viruses,
this is also very effective for Pets and other Animals like Cows and Goats!



Ps: but do a Research first before you use it!
edit on 10-12-2011 by Human0815 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 10 2011 @ 04:50 AM
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High doses of antibiotics kill bacteria.But when bacteria are subject to lower level doses,some survive and some die. The ones that survuve have a reproductive advantage. By this process, the bacteria quickly develop immunity.This is why doctors only prescribe antibiotics when necessary and insist that you complete the course. Modern surgery was not possible until 1945 when penicillin could kill the most infectious agent, Staphylococcus Aureus(SA).By 1947 some SA had become resistant to penicillin.In 1957 methicillin was introduced and methicillin-resistant SA bacteria (MRSA) developed within two years, making the wards of some hospitals inusable.Now only Vancomysin controls MRSA's worst excesses, but for how long?



posted on Dec, 10 2011 @ 07:07 AM
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Originally posted by The Sword
reply to post by lbndhr
 


Are you trying to stir up panic over something that is usually spread and contained in hospitals?

If anything, we all should wash our hands more often to avoid the spread of MOST diseases.


MRSA used to be hospital-acquired only, however, it has become community-acquired now, so its no longer isolated to health care facilities. But you're right on two accounts here, there is a little fear-mongoring going on and the BEST, BEST thing you can do is WASH OUR HANDS! Well said!!

We can break the Chain of Infection by Prevention!



posted on Dec, 10 2011 @ 09:44 AM
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Originally posted by The Sword
reply to post by lbndhr
 


Are you trying to stir up panic over something that is usually spread and contained in hospitals?

If anything, we all should wash our hands more often to avoid the spread of MOST diseases.


How is my daughter going on vacation in another state contracting MRSA then me researching this new potential fast spreadable staff infection which has highly evolved and know has become a social spreadable infection making me a fear monger? What I posted and said can be verified anywhere from local to state to government health sites with the warnings and alerts attached so you I view as a debunking troll. Peace



posted on Dec, 10 2011 @ 11:21 AM
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Originally posted by Quickfix
reply to post by Cosmic911
 


My terrible medical advice is what is used in hospitals, but i'm sure you knew that....

2nd line


Couldn't think of anything more intelligent than 2nd line, eh?

"Do not let her leave her room!" "Put a sign on her door!" Are you serious? This is great advice for a parent of a young child. Please! If you had any credible clinical practice you would know that we treat patients with MRSA different in the hospital than we do at home. You don't even know if she is just colonized or has an active wound or infection. If she has colonized MRSA than normal handwashing and good hygene should be good enough. If she has an open wound or pneumonia or draining pus than more measures are indicated. You have no information to draw a conclusion. You don't even know how she was diagnosed with MRSA! You never even asked her how she came to be MRSA positive. Do you even know how to be cultured for MRSA? Don't you find it odd that a young child out of state on vacation ended up with a MRSA diagnosis? Patients admitted to the hospital get nasally, orally, and anally swabbed. Wouldn't you need some background information on her hospitalization before jumping to fear-mongering and misinformed medical advice? I guess critical thinking never entered your equation.

And BTW...MRSA screening is not mandatory in U.S. hospitals....but I'm sure you already knew that...



posted on Dec, 10 2011 @ 12:25 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 


she contacted mrsa from a friend of the family, she had a papercut on her arm. A culture swab was done, its hospital-jail mrsa, the friend of the family had recently been in jail. She doesn't have pneumonia but 2 the scabby thinks are leaking, she has her own bathroom she stays in her room



posted on Dec, 10 2011 @ 12:39 PM
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Originally posted by lbndhr
reply to post by Cosmic911
 


she contacted mrsa from a friend of the family, she had a papercut on her arm. A culture swab was done, its hospital-jail mrsa, the friend of the family had recently been in jail. She doesn't have pneumonia but 2 the scabby thinks are leaking, she has her own bathroom she stays in her room


Gotcha. As long as she has an open wound and draining, you should continue to utilize some "reasonable" isolation precautions. There can be significant emotional distress in people who are isolated and it can be very depressing. People who are depressed can have weakened immune systems, making them more susceptible to opportunistic infections and actually worsen their disease. So, make sure her attitude is good, morale is up, and that she is well-rested and that her diet/nutrition is adequate.

I'm sure you know all of the following for the meantime, I'd wash linen/towels daily and separate from the rest of the family. Make sure you wash in Hot water and dry in High heat. Always use gloves when handling linen or her dressings/bandages. When handling her linen make sure you hold them away from your body to prevent cross-contamination. When cleaning the bathroom you can use a simple solution of 1 tablespoon bleach to 1 quart water. For cloth you can use a phenol-containing solution. Make sure you don't miss common items like the phone, door handles, and other surfaces like that.

Once the infection clears up, life will return to normal. But by all means, continue to practice all the good hygene like handwashing and things like that. I'm sure she will be fine. Please keep us updated.



posted on Dec, 12 2011 @ 05:41 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 



Do you see why i said what i did now? Now that there is more info on what she has it should be easy to say, she should be isolated.

I said in a previous post that we had NO DETAILS of how bad the infection was, so better safe then sorry, to say washing your hands is good enough, when you clearly had no details, would of made things worse for them.

Some professional opinion you had...



posted on Dec, 12 2011 @ 07:48 PM
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Originally posted by Quickfix
reply to post by Cosmic911
 



Do you see why i said what i did now? Now that there is more info on what she has it should be easy to say, she should be isolated.

I said in a previous post that we had NO DETAILS of how bad the infection was, so better safe then sorry, to say washing your hands is good enough, when you clearly had no details, would of made things worse for them.

Some professional opinion you had...



You're an idiot...and not a doctor...you should stop posting on medical forums...



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 03:27 AM
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reply to post by lbndhr
 


I'm not a troll. I work in a hospital and wanted to know the true purpose of this thread. You made your point, albeit crudely.

I hear about stuff like this all the time but I did not know that it could be contracted/spread outside of a hospital environment.



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 05:28 AM
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reply to post by The Sword
 


well i guess you learned something...i hope. MRSA can be contracted anyhere.

10 years ago a budy got it on a constuction job site when he cut his leg. The establishment wanted to cut off his leg...he said hell no and threw everything at it.

He still chugging along on the job sight with both legs.



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 03:28 PM
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reply to post by Cosmic911
 


Nice retort.

So is that all you have to say?

You know, being malicious like you were, just proves how ignorant you really are.

I am done responding to you, you aren't worth the time.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 09:18 PM
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If we have a MRSA patient in the hospital they are in isolation. (just like every hospital in the US.) We take the necessary precautions when treating them by wearing gowns, gloves, masks and we rarely allow them visitors (if they have a visitor, they wear protective wear, also.) So don't take this lightly ESPECIALLY if your body doesn't fight infection well.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 09:59 PM
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Why do people keep taking antibiotics for this stuff?

oregano oil

Coriander seed oil

Manuka Honey

Tumeric



Out of 300 people surveyed, all infected with MRSA, over 262 said that they had completely recovered using a simple spice from the supermarket - Turmeric. .


Out of 300 people surveyed, all infected with MRSA, over 262 said that they had completely recovered using a simple spice from the supermarket - Turmeric. .

Take charge of your own health, going to a doctor for this is just nuts.

LOTS of people writing in what they used when nothing a doctor gave them worked. Read, research, and don't be afraid to do it yourself. One woman literally saved her son's hand as he ran from the hospital chased by guards when the doctors wanted to take it off.

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