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Automobile / Gasoline usage discrepancies

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posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by Ajax
 



I'm perplexed because it always falls in line with how the economy tends to be doing.


You might want to consider getting yourself a locking gascap.




posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by Ajax

Same gas station each time. And I've tried to isolate virtually every factor that could be causing these drastic swings. It definitely lines up better to oil prices and the economy than it does the seasons.

A lot of gas stations, especially locally-owned ones, buy their gas from a small distributor, which in turn buys from the lowest priced suppliers. So the same station may have completely different blends/octane ratings from one week to the next.

Check the octane rating labels sometime on the pump (not the signs, but the inspection stickers). They specify a minimum octane rating as opposed to an exact one.

TheRedneck


Using higher octane gas then whats required by the manufacturer does not improve performance.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 04:04 PM
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Good journalling and research. I believe they use some kind of computerized control of this too. It makes perfect sense.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 04:06 PM
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SirMike, that sounds like it'd certainly be far more accurate than my 'semi-controlled' testing. I thought these ballpark range tests were telling just by the wild swings though, and very strange/coincidental. If it stays consistently this weird for much longer...I plan to do just that.

TheRedneck, thanks. I plan to check on that and to try out some other stations.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 04:08 PM
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reply to post by Ajax
 


Simpler solution, buy an aftermarket tunable ECS. I believe you have been experiencing what you say, I just don’t think it’s a plot by big oil who has tampered with your ECS.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 08:36 PM
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reply to post by SirMike

Actually, efficiency vs. octane is a curve. Efficiency (not performance) will typically improve substantially until it peaks at slightly above the manufacturer's recommended minimum octane, then will declines slowly as octane rating increases. Above a point, higher octane impedes efficiency. Manufacturer's ratings take into account minor potential fluctuations in octane rating, as it is almost impossible to blend gasoline to a constant octane rating in a retail environment.

But there is also more to gasoline than octane rating. Volatility, viscosity, hydrocarbon composition ratios, and several other differences can also make substantial differences in efficiency, even if the octane rating stays constant..

TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 09:09 PM
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I am not saying your theory isn't possible.
It is.
My Ford F150 'talks' to Ford. I can run a dianogstic and the truck will send it to a server that sends me an email with the results. Programing that system to do other things would not be that difficult.
Not since the system can go on line by itself already.

But!
I think your gas mileage variances have more to do with evaporation.
Gasoline evaporates very quickly and easily.
Just pumping gas in the heat of the day vs cooler times will make a difference.
Once your tank is less full the faster the gas will evaporate in the hot sun just while parked at work. Which is why letting your gas tank run empty will actually make it more empty... if that makes sense.
How fast you pump will change the evaporation rate also.
What I am saying if you let your tank run empty. Pump your gas in a hurry during the hot summer lunch break. Then the next time you take your time, early on a cool morning, while drinking your coffee on the way to work. That will make a difference.
I don't believe it would make enough of a difference that you are seeing.
However if you add the other thoughts from previous posters to this, it may add up to the differences you are seeing.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 10:03 PM
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Originally posted by MissPoovey
I am not saying your theory isn't possible.
It is.
My Ford F150 'talks' to Ford. I can run a dianogstic and the truck will send it to a server that sends me an email with the results. Programing that system to do other things would not be that difficult.
Not since the system can go on line by itself already.

But!
I think your gas mileage variances have more to do with evaporation.
Gasoline evaporates very quickly and easily.
Just pumping gas in the heat of the day vs cooler times will make a difference.
Once your tank is less full the faster the gas will evaporate in the hot sun just while parked at work. Which is why letting your gas tank run empty will actually make it more empty... if that makes sense.
How fast you pump will change the evaporation rate also.
What I am saying if you let your tank run empty. Pump your gas in a hurry during the hot summer lunch break. Then the next time you take your time, early on a cool morning, while drinking your coffee on the way to work. That will make a difference.
I don't believe it would make enough of a difference that you are seeing.
However if you add the other thoughts from previous posters to this, it may add up to the differences you are seeing.



Hey MissPoovey, well my car is black, so that would certainly add to the 'heat' element of it if the evaporation idea is true. I also of course do run it down very low - or close to empty each time before I fill up given my long commute each day. That idea makes some sense, as the lower it gets in theory the more surface area it would have, and the more it would slosh around and such. I also pump it quickly as opposed to slowly, and it tends to be during the afternoon not in the morning when it's warmer out. So everything you are suggesting does add up and I will definitely think more about those factors.

But you have to admit it seriously wouldn't be hard at all for any major manufacturer to program a computer in this way, especially nowadays. Computers do everything on cars now. Heck, even if they program the computer to burn it or 'run hotter' just intermittently so that it truly does use more would be more money for them and big oil - provided them have agreements together (which I'm sure they would). I'm telling you something really doesn't add up with it and the fluctuations are so noticeably huge that it's unnerving. The fluctuations go both ways - and not always better during winter, so an older, dirtier worn down car should be ruled out as well.

I understand that your factors along with all the other factors play major contributors. But the idea that they can control this is not far fetched whatsoever. The biggest problem with my theory is probably the fact that if the manufacturer were to get caught doing something so unscrupulous like this - they would lose a billion dollar industry... However a single sleazy car salesman with the knowledge of these computers and a business of his own, and ties to big oil, this would not be out of the realm of possibility. It's just harder to believe on a larger scale. But I really think something shady is going on.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 10:40 PM
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I will be watching this thread to see if you have changes in mileage after these tips/ideas are implemented.
Also that TPTB can manipulate your/our vehicle(s) is not out of the realm of possiblilty.

Checking the engines' circut board and maybe hacking into the in sync system for history of online access could tell you something. Or tell someone, not me. I wouldn't have the foggiest idea how to do anything like that.


Good luck.




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