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SCI/TECH: Painless injections coming soon

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posted on Aug, 21 2004 @ 05:11 AM
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The device called SonoPrep uses sound waves to create reversible microchannels to extract or insert fluids without any pain at all. All it takes is a 15 second treatment and a short 5 minute wait for the anesthetic to take affect. The device also has great potential to be useful to Diabetics to take the pain away from daily injections. The device, which is going for a hefty $US2,000 will begin marketing efforts this September.
 



www.betterhumans.com
A device has been approved that quickly numbs the skin for painless injections, paving the way for such things as pain-free blood tests, glucose sensing and insulin delivery for diabetics.

Developed by Robert Langer and colleagues at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, the device, called SonoPrep, speeds up the pain-relieving action of topical anesthetics, allowing for rapid, pain-free needle insertions.

SonoPrep was approved for use Tuesday by the US Food and Drug Administration.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Well this is great news for Diabetics,people with Aichmophobia(Fear of needles or pointed objects) and people with Agliophobia(Fear of Pain). How long it will be before we have Star Trek like Hypo-Sprays? Not long I'd say.

[edit on 21-8-2004 by John bull 1]




posted on Aug, 21 2004 @ 12:08 PM
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Ummmmm, they already have "hypo-sprays" and have been actively using them in the U.S. military for at least 8 years now. They do sting just a bit, but like the old fashioned syringes... the pain is minimal. Just so ya know.



posted on Aug, 21 2004 @ 12:18 PM
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Good post Sardion2000

This really sounds great news/breakthrough in the medical field. For me seeing needles getting inserted makes me gringe (if thats how its spelt lol) i think its a comman fear needles so this may help, especiailly for those who dont like pain

didnt know about the hypo sprays, sounds really sci fi.

rynaldo



posted on Aug, 21 2004 @ 12:26 PM
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Originally posted by rynaldo82
Good post Sardion2000

This really sounds great news/breakthrough in the medical field. For me seeing needles getting inserted makes me gringe (if thats how its spelt lol) i think its a comman fear needles so this may help, especiailly for those who dont like pain

didnt know about the hypo sprays, sounds really sci fi.

rynaldo


Not very sci-fi at all. It uses compressed air which is focused in very tight and narrow streams. The "injection" is forced through the pores of the skin at very high speeds. Not really that complicated. The only real difference between this method and the old fashioned syringes, is that there is no need to replace needles after each patient. That way they can have all the troops line up and then tag each with the good old goverment issue experimental vaccination boosters.



posted on Aug, 21 2004 @ 12:45 PM
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Aw, I dunno. I always looked forward to getting shots because i liked to psych the doctor out. I used to stare at them while they put the needle in my skin. Disconcerting. But this is definitley a great idea as my friend is diabetic and I feel bad for all the needles he has to see in his life.



posted on Aug, 21 2004 @ 01:31 PM
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There was an ad in my city of Edinburgh looking for volunteers for testing needleless injections for 200 bucks. I would have gone for it if I didnt have lupus but I wonder if its the same thing? Either way its a goodthing as it take away the phychological fear which is really why ppl hate injections as they arn't that sore.



posted on Aug, 21 2004 @ 01:37 PM
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Originally posted by fortunate1

Not very sci-fi at all. It uses compressed air which is focused in very tight and narrow streams. The "injection" is forced through the pores of the skin at very high speeds.


you dont bother reading do you?

"uses sound waves to create reversible microchannels" it doesnt force anything through pores, the device works very differently that what you describe.


Urn

posted on Aug, 21 2004 @ 02:18 PM
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namehere... fortunate1 was refering to the "hypo-spray" comment (like from star trek) that sardion2000 made at the end of his post, not the SonoPrep device.



posted on Aug, 21 2004 @ 03:52 PM
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i don't know what this thing looks like, but it sounds like it might be more intimidating than needles. also, of course it's gonna be painless if the use an anesthetic.


Odd

posted on Aug, 21 2004 @ 08:09 PM
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Sounds pretty neat to me. I hate needles.

I just wonder how sound waves are used to produce an anaesthetic effect...

...unless, of course, they're playing Yanni.



posted on Aug, 22 2004 @ 12:04 AM
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Originally posted by Odd
Sounds pretty neat to me. I hate needles.

I just wonder how sound waves are used to produce an anaesthetic effect...

...unless, of course, they're playing Yanni.


Sound Waves just open up the microchannels. After they are open then they inject the anaesthetic(lidocaine for example) wait 5 minutes then inject the medicine or take the blood/tissue sample. Whatever there are lots of applications for this technology IMHO.

"Hypo Sprays" as they exist in Star Trek do not exist yet. Those "Hypos" you thinking of are probably just regular Hypodermic Needles housed in a plastic casing for fast innoculation, like a Stim Pack. They are alot of limitations with hypodermic needles, one of them being the Needle size compared to individual cell is just fricken huge. If we can find a way to work around the cell walls we wound't even need to anaesthetisize the patient(and the patient wouldn't have any unsightly needle holes after innoculation.


[edit on 22-8-2004 by sardion2000]



posted on Aug, 22 2004 @ 12:54 AM
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Urn is right namehere. "You don't bother reading do you?"
If you had read the other posts, then you'd know that I was speaking of the "hypo-spray" comment and not the sonic pain reducer. Only people who feel... lacking in one department or another go through the trouble of being overly critical for the sake of being rude. Try being nice once and a while and you might make a friend or two
. Tsk tsk.



posted on Aug, 22 2004 @ 01:12 AM
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Lol. I'm pretty sure that I'm actually talking about a delivery system that uses compressed air or maybe just a compressed solution in order to make injections. I've seen one of the units and know for a fact that no needle is involved. The military gives out vaccinations in an assembly line fashion. The units in use now are not as small as the "Star Trek" fantasy versions, as they are connected by hoses to what appear to be compressors. The whole point that I was trying to make was not that we have the same freakin' hypo-sprays that were used in a sci-fi series, but that we already have needleless delivery systems for vaccinations and other intra-muscular and intra-veinous medications
Combined with this SonoPrep technology I imagine you'd have a painless, uninvasive, simpler and less wasteful method of administering medications. The medical procedures we've been using for the past century are going to seem barbaric to us ten or fifteen years from now lol.



posted on Aug, 22 2004 @ 01:27 AM
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Hmm I did not know that, and forgive me if im still skeptical cuz I've never heard of it before, but could you provide some links and pictures? I would really like to learn more about this compressed air technique, it sounds interesting. One other question, How much space does it take up?



posted on Aug, 22 2004 @ 10:30 AM
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I myself am a sceptical mind, so I'm not offended in the least
Actually, they have managed to reduce the size of these things to an almost "Star Trek" scale lol. I couldn't find a link for the exact unit that I was talking about but these are the same thing. The units shown on the Russian site (first one I've listed) are much smaller than the one that I saw first hand, so I assume that they've already gotten the tech pretty well compacted.
www.syrijetinc.com...
www.antarespharma.com...
www.jtip.com
I've only listed a few, but there are many many out there. Just do a search for "needleless injections" and you'll see what I mean
They all seem to use CO2 or something similar as a power source for the injection. They focus the solution into beams so tight and narrow that they actually act as a needle themselves, however most of these websites boast that this method is already almost painless. A few of the units appear to need to be connected to larger compressors, but some are actually self contained and about the size of an airbrush.
I'm having trouble with the links so if you can't pull up the sites then just do a search for Jtip, syrijetinc, etc.

[edit on 22-8-2004 by fortunate1]

[edit on 22-8-2004 by fortunate1]



posted on Aug, 22 2004 @ 09:49 PM
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When I had my military shots they didn't use a air gun powered needle but I heard of it. They just put you all in a big line and you go through a line with 2 people on each side of you sticking you for 3 sets of people. So about 6 shots. I had both sleeves up. I remember looking ahead and seeing some guy walking away with blood running down his arm and thinking ohhh great. Then the a$$ shot. That is another thing entirely.....



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