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Anonymity ban being explored for blogs

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posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 09:48 AM
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Anonymity ban being explored for blogs


www.ekathimerini.com

Greece - A new bill being prepared by the Justice Ministry could spell an end to Internet anonymity for the country’s approximately 55,000 bloggers.
(visit the link for the full news article)


edit on 11-8-2011 by Konstantinos because: spelling

edit on 11-8-2011 by Konstantinos because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 09:48 AM
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So it begins in this small country, the move to ban anonymity on the internet.
First it will be in the name of stoping cyber-crime.
The "Cyber-crime" will include remarks to uprise and demonstrate (especially in Greece).
If it goes through, then other countries with the same aspiration will use it as an example to try and push it through to their own people.

www.ekathimerini.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 09:51 AM
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The pen is mightier than the sword...

seems to be that way doesn't it


Anonimity has a place, that is not everywhere but it has a place.

However, if you truely believe what you say, you should stand behind what you say.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 09:54 AM
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Originally posted by JennaDarling


The pen is mightier than the sword...

seems to be that way doesn't it


Anonimity has a place, that is not everywhere but it has a place.

However, if you truely believe what you say, you should stand behind what you say.


try telling that to someone in Syria or Saudia Arabia



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 09:56 AM
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Originally posted by JohnySeagull

Originally posted by JennaDarling


The pen is mightier than the sword...

seems to be that way doesn't it


Anonimity has a place, that is not everywhere but it has a place.

However, if you truely believe what you say, you should stand behind what you say.


try telling that to someone in Syria or Saudia Arabia


Yes and I said Anonimity HAS ITS PLACE but it is not everywhere, but it has a place.

And in opressive places, yes that is one such place.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 09:57 AM
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its coming everywhere to an internet near you !!!!!


www.forbes.com...



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 09:58 AM
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Originally posted by JohnySeagull
its coming everywhere to an internet near you !!!!!


www.forbes.com...




The great firewall of London? *g*



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:04 AM
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It's a slippery slope that's for sure.
It would be years and years before it would be openly implemented in North America, but it's worth keeping an eye on...



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:05 AM
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Originally posted by Konstantinos

Anonymity ban being explored for blogs




Unfortunatly it already happened in a partial way in South Australia last year.
...legislation which will force internet bloggers and anyone publishing a comment on next month's state election to supply their real name and postcode.
AdelaideNow
So, there would be NO anonymous comment on that state election.

After massive criticism, the man who introduced the law, Michael Atkinson, said he would repeal it as soon as possible after that election.
Didnt happen.
But more recently, he said that demanding bloggers identify themselves during an election period was "a good requirement for civilising political discourse"

Good requirement for keeping your citizens quiet, more likely.

P.S. He's also the man who got a law passed that making it a criminal offence punishable by up to five years' imprisonment for those named in such orders to associate more than six times a year with fellow club members or others nominated by the Police Commissioner.
Which clubs? Well, anyone the government names, actually.
They promised they'd only use the law against evildoers though.

edit on 11-8-2011 by alfa1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:06 AM
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Originally posted by Konstantinos
It's a slippery slope that's for sure.
It would be years and years before it would be openly implemented in North America, but it's worth keeping an eye on...



Britian has been an opressive government for decades.... Northern Ireland for a start.

All phone calls from NI to the mainland and back where monitored and where routed via the main DMSU's to mainland entry points for monitoring. Probably still are today. All travel was monitored heavily for boats, planes etc.

Let's not also forget them putting bans on people talking with their own voices in the media, they had ACTORS voices do the oversampling when on the MEDIA for Sinn Fein / PIRA etc.


Lets not forget the Empire age (one can argue it still is an empire in different guises today).

You may think oh but the internet today... wrong again, there is probably only a handful of entry and exit points for routing in and out of the UK for the internet. Same for MOST countries,

Ever hear of those countries being cut off from the internet world when a cable is cut? Yeah.


edit on 11-8-2011 by JennaDarling because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:17 AM
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I think I speak for everyone when I say "BOOOOOOOOOOOOO!
" - On a serious note, this really does suck.

How long is it going to take before it's implemented in other places, I won't stand for this!

Jamie.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:20 AM
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Meet the new Bill C-51


The substance of the proposals that have the potential to fundamentally reshape the Internet in Canada. The bills contain a three-pronged approach focused on information disclosure, mandated surveillance technologies, and new police powers.

The first prong mandates the disclosure of Internet provider customer information without court oversight. Under current privacy laws, providers may voluntarily disclose customer information but are not required to do so. The new system would require the disclosure of customer name, address, phone number, email address, Internet protocol address, and a series of device identification numbers.

While some of that information may seem relatively harmless, the ability to link it with other data will often open the door to a detailed profile about an identifiable person. Given its potential sensitivity, the decision to require disclosure without any oversight should raise concerns within the Canadian privacy community.

The second prong requires Internet providers to dramatically re-work their networks to allow for real-time surveillance. The bill sets out detailed capability requirements that will eventually apply to all Canadian Internet providers. These include the power to intercept communications, to isolate the communications to a particular individual, and to engage in multiple simultaneous interceptions.

Moreover, the bill establishes a comprehensive regulatory structure for Internet providers that would mandate their assistance with testing their surveillance capabilities and disclosing the names of all employees who may be involved in interceptions (and who may then be subject to RCMP background checks).

The bill also establishes numerous reporting requirements including mandating that all Internet providers disclose their technical surveillance capabilities within six months of the law taking effect. Follow-up reports are also required when providers acquire new technical capabilities.

The requirements could have a significant impact on many smaller and independent Internet providers. Although the bill grants them a three-year implementation delay, the technical capabilities extend far beyond most of their commercial needs. Indeed, after years of concern over the privacy impact associated with deep-packet inspection of Internet traffic (costly technologies that examine Internet communications in real time), these bills appear to require all Internet providers to install such capabilities.

Having obtained customer information without court oversight and mandated Internet surveillance capabilities, the third prong creates a several new police powers designed to obtain access to the surveillance data. These include new transmission data warrants that would grant real-time access to all the information generated during the creation, transmission or reception of a communication including the type, direction, time, duration, origin, destination or termination of the communication.


Its happening in canada too, this bill will be passed in the next two months so i hear, since harper 'said' that it would be passed within his first 100 days in office.

Learn how to use TOR, i2p, proxies, and vpns. Or the government will no every last thing you do.
edit on 11/8/11 by AzureSky because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:23 AM
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Wow, seems like the governments are trying to prevent ideas from spreading. Reminds me of the ideas spread about the earth being round and such. Leads me to also think, the church still has the ultimate say in what ideas are good/bad. It would be easier to attack an idea if there was a person(s) behind it. You know like claiming they sleep with hookers, do drugs, fund terrorists, and sleep with little boys to dissuade that person's credibility. I'm sure we can all think of examples of this that has happened or is currently happening.

Thinking on your own is bad, conformity is good. Yea, right...



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:25 AM
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reply to post by JennaDarling
 




.....Anonimity has a place, that is not everywhere but it has a place.

However, if you truely believe what you say, you should stand behind what you say.


And if you do expect to never ever be able to get a job again. Corporations want "team Players" not mavericks. Human Resource departments routinely google peoples names and if you are not a good little Sheeple for get about getting a job.
edit on 11-8-2011 by crimvelvet because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:27 AM
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Originally posted by crimvelvet
reply to post by JennaDarling
 




.....Anonimity has a place, that is not everywhere but it has a place.

However, if you truely believe what you say, you should stand behind what you say.


And if you do expect to never ever be able to get a job again. Corporations want "team Players" not mavericks. Human Resource departments routinely google peoples names and if you are not a good little Sheeple for get about getting a job.
edit on 11-8-2011 by crimvelvet because: (no reason given)


HR may do that in America, but there is laws here that prevent them, hell I can get 120 day sick leave and the company is NOT ALLOWED to call me (that is harassment
).

They are not allowed to invade your privacy or spie on you at work or what all America seems to take for granted and normal.

Work over 40 hours a week? Unheard off lol, A Company here is NOT ALLOWED to PLAN overtime intentionally.


edit on 11-8-2011 by JennaDarling because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:30 AM
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Originally posted by JennaDarling

Originally posted by crimvelvet
reply to post by JennaDarling
 




.....Anonimity has a place, that is not everywhere but it has a place.

However, if you truely believe what you say, you should stand behind what you say.


And if you do expect to never ever be able to get a job again. Corporations want "team Players" not mavericks. Human Resource departments routinely google peoples names and if you are not a good little Sheeple for get about getting a job.
edit on 11-8-2011 by crimvelvet because: (no reason given)


HR may do that in America, but there is laws here that prevent them, hell I can get 120 day sick leave and the company is NOT ALLOWED to call me (that is harassment
).

They are not allowed to invade your privacy or spie on you at work or what all America seems to take for granted and normal.

Work over 40 hours a week? Unheard off lol, A Company here is NOT ALLOWED to PLAN overtime intentionally.


edit on 11-8-2011 by JennaDarling because: (no reason given)


Just because its illegal to do so,
Does not stop them at all. There are a few stories here in canada, where it is also illegal to obtain information from online sources. People not getting jobs due to things on their facebook?

(I've had employers tell me that when i look for another job, to fix up facebook..)

Number one, invasion of privacy, and basing wether i get a job or not on my personal life?



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:31 AM
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Originally posted by JennaDarling

Originally posted by crimvelvet
reply to post by JennaDarling
 




.....Anonimity has a place, that is not everywhere but it has a place.

However, if you truely believe what you say, you should stand behind what you say.


And if you do expect to never ever be able to get a job again. Corporations want "team Players" not mavericks. Human Resource departments routinely google peoples names and if you are not a good little Sheeple for get about getting a job.
edit on 11-8-2011 by crimvelvet because: (no reason given)


HR may do that in America, but there is laws here that prevent them, hell I can get 120 day sick leave and the company is NOT ALLOWED to call me (that is harassment
).

They are not allowed to invade your privacy or spie on you at work or what all America seems to take for granted and normal.

Work over 40 hours a week? Unheard off lol, A Company here is NOT ALLOWED to PLAN overtime intentionally.


edit on 11-8-2011 by JennaDarling because: (no reason given)


I hear what you say Jenna Darling BUT if you are going to an interview then HR can 'research' you prior to a job offer without recourse to the law and make an ''informed choice'' on what they see.......

Similar to dodgy 'stalkers' who research ex partners et al to find out more about them....... I say .limit what you put up because once it's up on the Internet then it's up there FOREVER !!

Regards

PDUK



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:32 AM
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How about this one.

Tory crim bill attack on our liberty


The Conservatives plan on introducing an omnibus crime bill when the House resumes that wraps all of their previous legislation into one.

The bill is promoted as allowing police to track and prosecute the perverts passing around child pornography and allows them to update their monitoring techniques to deal with the ever-changing computerized world we live in.

Sounds fine. What could be wrong with that?

In fact, there’s nothing wrong with that part, but there is plenty to worry about in what they propose to do regarding hate crimes.

The bill plans to make it a crime to link to any website that promotes hatred.

Here’s what the Library of Parliament says about the bill on its website: “Clause 5 of the bill provides that the offences of public incitement of hatred and wilful promotion of hatred may be committed by any means of communication and include making hate material available, by creating a hyperlink that directs web surfers to a website where hate material is posted, for example.”

For simply posting a link to a website that has material someone else deems hateful, you could go to jail for two years and be branded a criminal.

The Internet police. Only in Canada.

This isn’t about protecting people from genocide or even threats of death, the way the law is written now is much broader.

“Everyone who, by communicating statements, other than in private conversation, wilfully promotes hatred against an identifiable group is guilty.”


Jail for two years for posing i hate message? I dont like the government, everyone knows it, and ats has a lot of things about not liking said government which can be regarded by the government as hate material.

If i post an ATS link, i could be arrested and jailed for two years.



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:34 AM
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Originally posted by JennaDarling


The pen is mightier than the sword...

seems to be that way doesn't it


Anonimity has a place, that is not everywhere but it has a place.

However, if you truely believe what you say, you should stand behind what you say.


snipers should never give away their positions



posted on Aug, 11 2011 @ 10:40 AM
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Originally posted by JennaDarling

Originally posted by Konstantinos
It's a slippery slope that's for sure.
It would be years and years before it would be openly implemented in North America, but it's worth keeping an eye on...



Britian has been an opressive government for decades.... Northern Ireland for a start.

All phone calls from NI to the mainland and back where monitored and where routed via the main DMSU's to mainland entry points for monitoring. Probably still are today. All travel was monitored heavily for boats, planes etc.



edit on 11-8-2011 by JennaDarling because: (no reason given)



Those monitoring measures were put in place because during that period the UK mainland was regularly suffering bombing campaigns by Irish terrorists. Explosive devices were being planted in bars, shops and public parks. Within that context, call me crazy, but I'd argue the situation presents a clear justification for extreme surveillance of communication and transport routes into the targeted country.

The "big brother" scenario we saw with Northern Ireland in the 1970's and 1980's is completely different to one of a government wanting to silence or monitor bloggers purely through fear that what is posted on those blogs may damage someone's chances during an election.

In a democracy the former is a required (and logical) action. The latter is immoral.


edit on 11-8-2011 by Motorhead because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-8-2011 by Motorhead because: (no reason given)



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