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Tasmanian Globster - Footage from August 1960

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posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 03:57 AM
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Cryptozoologist Markus Hemmler recently "unearthed" previously unknown footage of the so-called Tasmanian Globster as blogged by Craig Woolheater from Cryptomundo.



According to Loren Coleman:

The term “Globster” was coined in 1962 by zoologist Ivan T. Sanderson to describe the 1960 carcass (shown above in the news clipping), which today is known as the “Tasmanian Globster.” It was a large unidentified carcass that washed ashore in western Tasmania, in August 1960. It measured 20 by 18 feet (6 m by 5.5 m) and was estimated to weigh between 5 and 10 tons. The mass lacked eyes and in place of a mouth, had “soft, tusk-like protuberances,” with a spine and six soft, fleshy “arms.” The remarkable stiff, white bristles covering its body were always mentioned as adding to the mystery of what this could be.


Sadly the video doesn't show much - so it's really not possible to give an intelligent opinion based on the footage. Wikipedia has an image of a newspaper showing the globster - perhaps only to give the video som perspective.

The description of this Globster did however remind me of the description of "Trunko" a South African Globster.


While it was beached, the animal was measured by beach-goers and turned out to be 47 ft (14 m) in length, 10 ft (3 m) wide, and 5 ft (1.5 m) high, with the trunk's length being 5 ft (1.5 m), the trunk's diameter 14 in (36 cm), the tail 10 ft (3 m), and the fur being 8 in (20 cm) long. The trunk was said to be attached directly to the animal's torso, as no head was visible on the carcass


There is however one detail that caught my eye: "The remarkable stiff, white bristles covering its body ..." This resembles the description of "Trunko":
"witnesses reported witnessing an extraordinary battle between two whales and a yet unknown marine animal covered in snowy white fur"
Source

After the discovery of lost photos of "Trunko" it was suggested that it was nothing more than " a massive, tough skin-sac of blubber containing collagen that is sometimes left behind when a whale dies and its skull and skeleton have separated from the skin and sunk to the sea bottom"...


On 6 September 2010, however, the long-awaited identity of Trunko was finally revealed. Karl Shuker announced that a hitherto-unknown photograph of Trunko had been discovered by German cryptozoologist Markus Hemmler on the website of the Margate Business Association, and Shuker recognised from this photo that Trunko had been nothing more than a globster, i.e. a massive, tough skin-sac of blubber containing collagen that is sometimes left behind when a whale dies and its skull and skeleton have separated from the skin and sunk to the sea bottom. The photo had been snapped by Johannesburg photographer A. C. Jones, who had visited Trunko's remains while they were beached. Three days later, Shuker revealed that he and Hemmler had independently discovered two more photos of Trunko by Jones that had been published in the August 1925 issue of Wide World Magazine. These close-up photos showed a classic globster, confirming Shuker's identification of Trunko, and clearly revealed its white 'fur' to be exposed connective tissue fibres.
Source


Additional Info on Trunko
More photographs of Trunko

Thus I think the Tasmanian Globster is yet another case of Occam's razor. Usually the case when it comes to decaying carcasses, i.e. mistaken identity.




 
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