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True fact: A common ingredient in commercial breads is derived from human hair harvested in China

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posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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True fact: A common ingredient in commercial breads is derived from human hair harvested in China


www.naturalnews.com

If you read the ingredients label on a loaf of bread, you will usually find an ingredient listed there as L-cysteine. This is a non-essential amino acid added to many baked goods as a dough conditioner in order to speed industrial processing. It's usually not added directly to flour intended for home use, but you'll find it throughout commercial breads such as pizza dough, bread rolls and pastries. While some L-cysteine is directly synthesized in laboratories, most of it is extracted from a cheap
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posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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and abundant natural protein source: human hair. The hair is dissolved in acid and L-cysteine is isolated through a chemical process, then packaged and shipped off to commercial bread producers. Besides human hair, other sources of L-cysteine include chicken feathers, duck feathers, cow horns and petroleum byproducts. Most of the hair used to make L-cysteine is gathered from the floors of barbershops and hair salons in China, by the way.


I guess I'm not to concerned about consuming L-Cysteine from human hair, since we get L-Cysteine from consuming pork, sausage meat, chicken, turkey, duck, luncheon meat, eggs, milk, whey protein, ricotta, cottage cheese, yogurt, red peppers, garlic, onions, broccoli, brussels sprouts, oats, granola, wheat germ, and lentil.

What does concern me though is L-Cysteine's function as a Mechanisms of neurotoxicity to cause neurological degeneration by causing the brain cells to overwork themselves until they die like N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and monosodium glutamate (MSG).



www.naturalnews.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:18 PM
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I think I just got sick to my stomach! I love bread and this just turned me off. IS anything safe to eat now??



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:21 PM
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I'm glad I wasn't eating a sandwich as I read that!

That is truly disturbing...



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:22 PM
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Originally posted by chrismicha77
I think I just got sick to my stomach! I love bread and this just turned me off. IS anything safe to eat now??


I would stick with the wife.....lol.....



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by MIDNIGHTSUN
 


OK. This is just my two cents but if L-Cystein is prevelent in all those foods you listed why are we cannibalizing human hair. Why not extract it from one of those products. Very odd choice with so many options.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:25 PM
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Yum.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by MIDNIGHTSUN
 


Damn! And all this time I have been blaming my wife for all those stray hairs I find in my sandwiches!



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:35 PM
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Yes and most people don't also know that foods from meat to cookies have this coloring bade from bugs..
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:35 PM
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wait does this count as canibalism
I'm a vegiterian I don't wanna be a cannibal not evan accidently!!!



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by MIDNIGHTSUN
 


well i certainly hope they're not smoking meth or crack cuz I hear that stays in your hair follicles for years



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:37 PM
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cough cough excuse me i just coughed up a hairball



thanks i will never look at a pizza with those mouthwatering eyes agian.

so mean.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:40 PM
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Human hair is sustainable. Why not? No harm done.

You go around reading all this nonsense and take it all to heart and the worry will kill you long before a food product does. Worry can knock five years off your life you know?

When natural stuff becomes a worry, you know this has crossed the line to paranoia.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:43 PM
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Ok did anyone grab a loaf off their shelf and check it? I am from the US and there is no such ingredient in any of my bread products. 3 different brands.
edit on 16-6-2011 by elouina because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:46 PM
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Once upon a time, not so long ago...ok about 10 years ago in the UK, Tesco's put a recommened daily allowance note on the wrappers of their own brand bread...which said 4 slices of bread per day per person.They soon realised that they had shot themselves in the foot, and retracted the note. This is backed up with any study...not because of the chemicals, but because of the carbohydrate amount...obesity, diabetes, digestive problems. Kudos to Tesco for being honest...even if it didn't last.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 04:56 PM
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I'm not sure if human hair is still used as an industrial source of L-cysteine. I'm pretty sure that was phased out some time ago in place of duck feathers. In any case, I hardly think it's an issue, considering the ungodly places the water you drink once existed. They are chemically extracting the cysteine from the feathers/hair, they aren't just putting mulled up feathers in there. But, if you are that concerned, you could always buy halal bread, since they use synthetic cysteine.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 05:01 PM
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Originally posted by elouina
Ok did anyone grab a loaf off their shelf and check it? I am from the US and there is no such ingredient in any of my bread products. 3 different brands.
edit on 16-6-2011 by elouina because: (no reason given)


They use cysteine in bread as it operates as a reducing agent. Essentially, it breaks apart the gluten that naturally occurs in the bread so as to soften it. You achieve the same thing mechanically by kneading it, however the reaction is reversible and will reverse upon proofing/baking. It is of course, not the only thing available, so cysteine is not always used. Have a read of this.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 05:06 PM
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Originally posted by hypervalentiodine

Originally posted by elouina
It is of course, not the only thing available, so cysteine is not always used. Have a read of this.


That is what I was getting at. Before going bleh, check the bread on your shelf. There are enough brands out there.
edit on 16-6-2011 by elouina because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by MIDNIGHTSUN
 


Well I have no a worry in the world since I gave up commercial crappy bread a long time ago for live bread (sprouted seeds bread, beside most bread are full of nothing but corn syrup and preservatives, rarely breads at all this days.




posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 05:23 PM
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Originally posted by elouina
Ok did anyone grab a loaf off their shelf and check it? I am from the US and there is no such ingredient in any of my bread products. 3 different brands.


This is in the OP........


It's usually not added directly to flour intended for home use, but you'll find it throughout commercial breads such as pizza dough, bread rolls and pastries.


I think I might ask for a discount on hair cuts from now on,if the off cuts are sold.

Makes me think of that poop burger thread,heck I`d want money for my poop.



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