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Air Traffic Control to consider nap time for workers

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posted on Apr, 15 2011 @ 07:12 PM
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www.msnbc.msn.com...


The FAA and the controllers union — with assistance from NASA and the Mitre Corp., among others — has come up with 12 recommendations for tackling sleep-inducing fatigue among controllers. Among those recommendations is that the FAA change its policies to give controllers on midnight shifts as much as two hours to sleep plus a half-hour to wake up.


This is insane, why not just change the way the controlles are scheduled. With an 8 hour work day split into three shifts, the workers will have 16 hours off to get enough rest to able to stay awake and do thier job. What is wrong with people that they need to be coddled so much. We may as well have puppet shows and story time up in the towers too then they can have their nappy nap and then have snack. This is rediculous.




posted on Apr, 15 2011 @ 07:18 PM
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"Okay everyone, eat your milk and cookies...

All done? Now get your blankies, it's time for a nap!"

I've worked plenty of 12 hour shifts (even at night), and didn't need a nap. Ridiculous.



posted on Apr, 15 2011 @ 07:21 PM
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lol crazy

I have worked 3rd shift most of my life and never had any issues.

Then again, there are those of us unnatural folks that have reversed circadian rhythms. Guess they should test for that before hiring?



posted on Apr, 15 2011 @ 07:25 PM
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I agree I am a paramedic and i work plenty of 12 hour overnight shifts, and we are not allowed to sleep and none of us have ever had any problems.



posted on Apr, 15 2011 @ 07:31 PM
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This study that involves NASA and MITRE has been going on for some time. The issue isn't so much working the night shift, its more because of the constant rotating shifts. They start their work week with two swing shifts 3pm-11pm, then two day shift 7am-3pm and then they go in for the midnight shift after their second day shift.

The ongoing changes from day-day, week to week cause fatigue because the body cannot set itself in a pattern. Its more than just working a night shift. I'm not saying sleeping on duty is the right thing, I just think you need to know the entire issue.



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