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SCI/TECH: 10Gbps Ethernet In The Works

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posted on Jul, 25 2004 @ 11:15 AM
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With 1Gpbs ethernet just now becoming standardized, developers are already looking to the future. In the past whenever more bandwith is made avaliable, applications are quickly found that use up that extra speed. Already the IEEE (the group that determines the standards for networking mediums) is amending standards to start paving the way for 10Gbps communication.
 



www.reed-electronics.com
For years, people have cited users' insatiable appetite for more and more data as the primary driving factor for our ever-expanding networks. Each time Ethernet rates have been increased by an order of magnitude, users have quickly consumed the newly available bandwidth.

With 1-Gbps Ethernet NICs (network-interface cards) becoming standard on desktop and workstation computers, silicon vendors are poised to once again bring Ethernet to a new level by reaching for 10 Gbps.




Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


For people that don't exactly know that much about networking technology, if you are reading this article you are using a network. Networks communicate over different methods known as a medium, which could be anything as simple as telephone wires or as complex as microwave transmissions.

The standard for a while now has been 100Mbps (pronounced mips) transmission, which means 100000000 bits per second. Currently the world is transitioning to 1Gbps (I guess its pronounced gips) which means 1000Mbits or 100000000000 bits per second (by the way a byte is 8 bits of data) and this new technology would mean 10Gbps or 1000000000000 bits per second.

Whenever 10Gpbs becomes standard, current data could be transferred instantly and network slowdowns would quickly become a thing of the past, leading to more efficient uses of technology by everyone.

EDIT: Correction - Article stated bits instead of byte.

[edit on 7-25-2004 by Valhall]




posted on Jul, 25 2004 @ 11:51 AM
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I really wonder what will be the maximum speed that can be made, (or bandwidth)
I mean It had to stop somewhere

[edit on 25-7-2004 by DJFiyaaBl8]



posted on Jul, 25 2004 @ 12:51 PM
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10GPS, whoa doggy. That would be cool.


There really is no end in sight. With every advancement in technology, that enables companies and scientists to discover or even create new technology. As an example look at the pc. The pc's processor speed started at about 16MHZ, now we up around 4GHZ. In only 25 years. Pretty fast. Give it another 3 years, I'll bet instead of 10GPS, it will be around 100GPS or higher.

Can't wait. Now if I could just get rid of dial-up.




posted on Jul, 25 2004 @ 01:51 PM
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what is ether?? is it thinner than say fiber optics or will the cables just be the size of banananas??

also wait for nanotechnology internet, heck just wait for nanotechnology, lol.



posted on Jul, 25 2004 @ 02:03 PM
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The internet and network speeds are only kept down due to hardware avaliabliliy and the grade of the phone networks. As for processors, in terms of MHZ not "bits" is pretty much maxed out due to heat limitations. However I belive they are working on changing from silicon chips to a new material, I read somewhere man made diamonds may be used.



posted on Jul, 25 2004 @ 02:25 PM
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The 10 gig card is already out. Intel has put it out.

www.intel.com...

It was used recently for an internet speed test in which the world record was established. It would seem the uses for something like this would be greatly limited.



posted on Jul, 25 2004 @ 02:28 PM
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Wow! Its only $4,770 for the adapter!



posted on Jul, 25 2004 @ 02:32 PM
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Wow.. apparently I didn't scroll down far enough. lol. I'll be happy with my 1 gig network. The average person won't have a need for a 10 gig card. Heck most people don't really have a need for a 100 base card either. Small businesses may use a 100 base for accessing the office database. For the most part 1 gig is overkill to them even. For quite a while the demand for the 10 gig will be extremely limited and may never reach a point where the desktop user will be using it. Also I believe that is a 64bit card and most desktop systems don't have 64bit pci slots.



posted on Jul, 25 2004 @ 03:35 PM
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I could see how this would be useful though, maybe if you were some huge corporation that transferred loads of data at a time. For the average joe like myself I might just have to wait until it gets a bit cheaper.



posted on Jul, 25 2004 @ 05:17 PM
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WOW! that is fast!

Technology grows so fast! it's hard to keep up to date!

you buy a computer that is top of the line, and next month, something new and much better comes out!



posted on Jul, 25 2004 @ 05:51 PM
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Currently, 10 gig Ethernet is being used by large companies for backbone uses (servers talking to other server). Now like all other ethernet, the actual increse in bandwidth from plain gigabitis about 40%, yes 40%. The rest is used up in "overhead". Like all things as time goes on, it will come down in price and become more common. Not that many years ago, a 3mbps net work was considered screaming fast, now I have gigabit lan built into my m/b.



posted on Jul, 26 2004 @ 02:04 AM
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Yeah that just crazy fast, I like it. I have a Cable modem and its considered to be 100mbps. But I can only download things at around 130kbps, I was curious does anyone hear know why this is?



posted on Jul, 26 2004 @ 05:49 AM
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To be honest, a T1 cannot fully take advantage of a 100baseT Ethernet connection. A T3 might though. Cable is usually a tad slower then a T1 downloading wise. Uploads,.. let not go there. If you were connected to another computer by way of Lan through that same card, you could try to send it a 600 Megabyte file, then compare that to downloading one. There will be quite a difference, the LAN should be way faster than downloading off of the net. As I said earlier.. a T3 Internet connection might well be an exception though.



posted on Jul, 26 2004 @ 11:09 AM
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Originally posted by DJFiyaaBl8
I really wonder what will be the maximum speed that can be made, (or bandwidth)
I mean It had to stop somewhere

[edit on 25-7-2004 by DJFiyaaBl8]


I wonder that too....

Is there a limit on how fast we can go??



posted on Jul, 26 2004 @ 12:02 PM
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Murcielago
The reason is that is the connection speed from the modem to your network. Usually the modem has a 1.5mbps out to the net. The reason you download at "only" about 150k is overhead and the rest of the internet. Traffic and other systems that are not as fast as yours. There are many more reasons, but it gets to technicial for this forum. Even in a 100mbps network, actual transfer speeds are usually around 40mbps.



posted on Jul, 28 2004 @ 04:32 AM
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Originally posted by mrmonsoon
Murcielago
The reason is that is the connection speed from the modem to your network. Usually the modem has a 1.5mbps out to the net. The reason you download at "only" about 150k is overhead and the rest of the internet. Traffic and other systems that are not as fast as yours. There are many more reasons, but it gets to technicial for this forum. Even in a 100mbps network, actual transfer speeds are usually around 40mbps.


This is an incorrect statement.
The reason reason you download at 150KB but your connection is rated at 1.5Mb is because your looking at two different transfer ratings. All internet connections are rated in BITS (ex: 1.5Megabits or Mbps ) while file transfers are rated in KiloBytes(ex: 150KiloBytes or KBps).



For example. There are 8 BITS in a BYTE. At home, we have a 1.5Mbps (Megabit) connection to the internet via ADSL. Take that 1.5 Mbps and translate it into real number form, which is 1500. Now divide that 1500 Bits by 8 to get a byte translation. You end up with a theoretical throughput of 187.5 KBps or KiloBytes per second. This is what file transfers are rated in. This is often how broadband companies snag customers who dont know their technology well. They think they are buying 1.5 MegaByte Per second service, but its really only Megabits!

While you are correct about inernet traffic (and other forms such as noisey line, packet loss, bad routers btween client and server, etc etc) It is not why a 1.5 Megabit connection transfers at 150KiloBytes. Thats actualy a good file transfer speed for a broadband connection as your only hitting around 25-30 below a PERFECT connection (Which is rare or unseen in any broadband situation since most 1.5Megabit connections actualy run around 1100-1400).

Remember not to confuse Mbps with MBps or Kbps with KBps. They are two different worlds.



The standard for a while now has been 100Mbps (pronounced mips) transmission, which means 100000000 bits per second.


Also in the article i noticed he said the connection term (mbps) translated to "mips". This is not correct. Mbps is an abbreviation, its pronounced "Megabits per second" while Gbps is the same and pronounced "Gigabits per second" Mips is a term used to calculate the speed in which a CPU can execute commands.

mip

n : (computer science) a unit for measuring the execution speed of a computer's CPU (but not the whole system); "4 MIPS is 4,000,000 instructions per second" [syn: MIPS, million instructions per second]




[edit on 28-7-2004 by ThermoNuke]



posted on Jul, 28 2004 @ 05:17 AM
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I think that that is pretty cool about standard ethernet connections going to 10 GBS. I work in the military doing wide ban communications and the world fiber back bone is about to be installed for long haul communications.

10 GBS is very high for LAN connections but with the new Dense Wave Divison Multiplexing technology there will eventually be OC (Optical Carriers) 768 or 96 GBS on the WAN. These systems are just coming on line now and are going to rapidly increase the amount of bandwidth that will be used on a world wide basis.



posted on Jul, 28 2004 @ 09:56 AM
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I was reading an article this morning about wireless running at 100mbps

Thats pretty impressive too!



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