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confused about the moons behaviour

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posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 02:33 PM
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hello ats, gonna make this short and quick.
On the 19th march me and my family was looking forward to watching the supermoon rise. Well it did and we all thought it was amazing and took some fabulous photos. It rose from the horizon from my point of veiw at about 7.30pm. But I really wanted to see it set because it always seems bigger when its going down near the horizon. Unfortunately I fell asleep and missed it, So on sunday I was eagerly waiting for the moon to pop up on the horizon again. From exacly the same point of standing and view point from the night before I waited... The moon did not rise above the same horizon until after 10.30pm. Im sure this is not normal, can someone enlighten me. And yes ill be watching again tonight. Thanks




posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 02:35 PM
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reply to post by Dinoman
 


I think people have been acting weird lately saying crazy stuff and doing crazy stuff too theres been a couple murders in my city over the last 2 days and even more crime and incidents of such nature the moon affects all people in a different way


yea last night the moon was doing weird stuff and then it started talking to me weird huh and I took all my lithium but i still think its acting funny lately....lol
edit on 21-3-2011 by Mandelbrot2012 because: (no reason given)

edit on 21-3-2011 by Mandelbrot2012 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 02:36 PM
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The moon does not rise or set at the exact same time very night.

www.timeanddate.com...



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 02:39 PM
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oh wow that's mean



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 03:12 PM
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reply to post by gimme_some_truth
 
Thanks for the link, and just as i thought. Adifference of about twenty minutes. It appeared three hours different on the 20th march than it did on the 19th. This i am sure of because I was waiting, and checking every 15 minutes. Also when it rose it was further to the south, and I remember last summer it would be a little further north each night when the moon appeared.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by Dinoman
 


Current moon view of earth

this link will give you a cool perspective from the moon looking at earth they also have links to see the suns view of earth.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 04:10 PM
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So? After watching the links provided, was it still normal to see the Moon rise at the time it did, OP?



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 07:23 PM
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I was just about to make a post about the Moon in the 2012 forum and saw this post. Is the supermoon fact or theory?

It seems to be getting awful close, you not think?

Absolutely any chance this could be Nibiru and not another Planet like everyone thinks?



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 07:38 PM
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Originally posted by scottlpool2003
I was just about to make a post about the Moon in the 2012 forum and saw this post. Is the supermoon fact or theory?

It seems to be getting awful close, you not think?

Absolutely any chance this could be Nibiru and not another Planet like everyone thinks?


No, it's a natural cycle. It has happened before and will repeat in 2026 (I think). This is a normal.

However, there IS an anomaly in the orbit of the Moon. The way I see it is that the eccentricity of the Moon isn't as it is supposed, here's the paper in question.

There's also an ATS thread about this, it has been featured on the front page a couple of days ago.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 09:28 AM
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Originally posted by Dinoman
reply to post by gimme_some_truth
 
Thanks for the link, and just as i thought. Adifference of about twenty minutes. It appeared three hours different on the 20th march than it did on the 19th. This i am sure of because I was waiting, and checking every 15 minutes. Also when it rose it was further to the south, and I remember last summer it would be a little further north each night when the moon appeared.



Sorry to say but you are wrong.

A difference of three hours would be noticed not just by professional astronomers but also by armature astronomers and mariners. Remember the tides are determined by the Moon. Ships leave port based on the tides. If they were late the ships would have to leave late. Seamen would be raising alarm. On shore most sea based business have ‘tide’ clocks on their walls. They would have raised alarms.

This is not something that would be overlooked by the media or could possibly be covered up. So the error is on your part.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 12:19 PM
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reply to post by samkent
 


I can assure you there was a difference of three hours, I was up and down every fifteen minutes from 7.30pm. Thats the time we watched it rise on the 19th. I was alredy discussing the whereabouts of the moon by 8.30pm. It was a clear night, Then low and behold there it appeared at about 10.30pm. But, I believed it could possibly be normal so here I am asking ats for any ideas or explanations. I was not asking ats if this happened. I know this happened, I watched it happen.



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 02:01 PM
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reply to post by Dinoman
 


The first thing we know is that the Moon did nothing unusual. The question is really a matter of why you perceived this to happen. The motion of the Moon is tracked down to millimeters. Had anything happened to affect the motion of the Moon down to movements so small that its measurement would seem almost impossible to measure, everyone would be talking about it.

Did you consider that you got the first time wrong or consider a change in daylight savings time? As has been pointed out, there are charts of the Moon phases and tide charts and lunar calendars that would have caused people to notice. Remember that Easter is a religious holiday tied into the Moon. A change as large as what you claim would have been noticed by fishermen, astronomers, and religious groups worldwide.







 
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